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Why the double standard for grown ups vs kids?

Anonymous
Posted by Anonymous
  • 2 Replies

So, reading the post about the kid who ate the pound of lunch meat got me thinking.  Kinda regularly on here, moms will get bashed to hell for complaining that their kid is eating a lot or sneaking food.  The common rhetoric is that "the kid is hungry" and that they should just "buy more food".  If the mom actually punishes the child for eating to excess, then she's accused of trying to create an eating disorder.

Then, when moms come in here complaining that their child is overweight, a lot of suggestions get thrown around that include limiting foods (hey, wasn't that what some moms do in the first place, but get called bad parents for denying them food?).  I don't often see the mom in those specific posts being bashed for letting their kids get that way in the first place, though you do see such claims in other threads talking about overweight kids in general.  Some other suggestions I see in "my kid is overweight" threads is telling the mom to work with a doctor (physician, nutritionist, etc) as well as putting the child in therapy.

While I think those are wonderful suggestions, why can't they be made for grown women who are overweight?  A post I saw earlier today offered a woman some great suggestions for losing the weight if they were actually applied, however there was a lot of "you're making excuses" comments.  As grown women, we are responsible for our own food intake; we don't have someone in our house to put a lock on the cupboard and say "You're only allowed to eat this much of this type of food at this time" like we can do with our children.  And I don't think I have once seen anyone suggest that someone struggling to lose weight should seek therapy for their poor relationship with food.

From my own struggles, I believe that losing weight is a lot more mental than it is physical.  Finding the motivation to really make the changes necessary, finding support, being able to tell yourself "no", finding the will to go on when you've made changes and you're still not seeing the results in either the measuring tape or the scale, etc.  Why are these women, who clearly outline that they have an unhealthy relationship with food and other mental blocks to losing weight, told that they're simply making excuses instead of being told to seek help?  You suggest women bend over backwards to help their children who are struggling with the same thing that grown women are, but the grown women are expected to just suck it up and knuckle down.

Posted by Anonymous on May. 17, 2015 at 5:50 PM
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Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on May. 17, 2015 at 5:58 PM

BUMP!

Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on May. 17, 2015 at 6:36 PM
Bump
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