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At what age do kids get a say in their medications?

Anonymous
Posted by Anonymous
  • 81 Replies

I have an 11 year old son who is on Concerta for ADHD. He is bright and isn't hyperactive, but without medication school is a lot more of a struggle. He can't focus. Homework was always a fight. He definitely wasn't performing at his potential because of his distractability and disorganization.

We tried non-medication methods first as we all agreed that medication wasn't the first step. Modified diet, made sure he was active, eating healthy, and getting plenty of sleep. We limit screen time, he's in karate, we eat very little processed sugar, especially for breakfast. No real change, so we tried medications. We have tried a couple at varying doses to find one that worked for him, and from what I see it's great. He has gotten straight As, comes home and gets homework done quickly, even wrote and 'published' a novel for NaNoWriMo. He isn't crabby in the evenings, eats dinner every night, and sleeps well.

The trouble is that he wants to stop taking it. He says he hates the way it makes him feel, he doesn't like that it takes away his appetite during the day (he isn't underweight, he is at a good BMI after being slightly overweight), and it makes him "uncomfortable."

I know he's a kid who isn't looking at the big picture, but I hate making him take a medicine that he hates. He will struggle a lot more in school without it, but he won't fail. 

WWYD in this situation?

Posted by Anonymous on Feb. 6, 2016 at 5:43 PM
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Replies (1-10):
Bieg9093
by on Feb. 6, 2016 at 5:48 PM
I would work with him to adjust dosage and timing. I wouldn't hand over full control over the meds to my kid until the puberty upheavals are fully over...14 or 15.

 


Don't text and drive. 


That doesn't mean you can look at your phone at red lights or stop signs or if you think you can do it quickly or if traffic's slow.  Just don't.  You're an adult.  Exercise some impulse control.  Quit driving like a 4 year old. 

bigmouthbabe
by on Feb. 6, 2016 at 5:49 PM
1 mom liked this
Depends on their ability to understand the long term affects of their decision. I recently allowed dd15 to have a say in medication she took.
mem82
by Platinum Member on Feb. 6, 2016 at 5:52 PM
Maybe he can take medicine breaks on the weekends?
curvygurl1912
by on Feb. 6, 2016 at 5:56 PM
I have allowed my dd to make informed decisions regarding medication for almost 2 years. Informed being the key word. She asks for my input and I give it, as well as her medical professional, but it is ultimately up to her.
Eta- my dd is 15
Anonymous
by Anonymous 2 on Feb. 6, 2016 at 6:00 PM
3 moms liked this
I'm wondering if part of his weird feelings are puberty and not the meds at all.
Anonymous
by Anonymous 3 on Feb. 6, 2016 at 6:06 PM
1 mom liked this
18. I am ultimately responsible for his health until then. That being said, I do listen to his input. If the negative effects outweigh the benefits I'd agree to look into other options.

My son is 16 and has bipolar depression. His medications have negative side effects that he doesn't like (constipation, sleepiness), but he's no longer suicidal. It's to his benefit to stick with what's working.
Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on Feb. 6, 2016 at 6:12 PM

He does. He only takes it on school days, so over breaks, weekends, and random days off he doesn't take it (though I think that causes him to feel worse when he does take it)

Quoting mem82: Maybe he can take medicine breaks on the weekends?


Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on Feb. 6, 2016 at 6:13 PM

Unfortunately there aren't really better options that we haven't explored. Stimulants are best for ADHD by far.

Quoting Anonymous 3: 18. I am ultimately responsible for his health until then. That being said, I do listen to his input. If the negative effects outweigh the benefits I'd agree to look into other options. My son is 16 and has bipolar depression. His medications have negative side effects that he doesn't like (constipation, sleepiness), but he's no longer suicidal. It's to his benefit to stick with what's working.


Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on Feb. 6, 2016 at 6:14 PM

It is definitely compounding things. But he describes feeling "zoned" and irritable that he definitely associates with taking his medicine. 

Quoting Anonymous 2: I'm wondering if part of his weird feelings are puberty and not the meds at all.


Aquarius_RN
by Bronze Member on Feb. 6, 2016 at 6:16 PM
depends on the child, the maturity, and what the illness is that is being treated.
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