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What is your success story?

Anonymous
Posted by Anonymous
  • 11 Replies

I recently had a conversation with a friend about the american dream. She says that its impossible for the average person to achieve the american dream these days. I had to disagree with her.

I was born poor to immigrant parents. They both came to this country as children with not much more than the clothing on their backs. Their parens worked extremely hard to provide for them, teaching them incredible work ethic and drive.  My parents also worked hard hard to provide the necessities for us. We were a bit better off than my parents were as kids but still struggled to put food on the table. My siblings and I all learned the importance of hard work from my parents and grandparents. Nothing was ever handed to us. We worked for everything we have. None of us struggle today. We all found our paths and busted our butts to travel down those paths to success. Some of us learned trades and some of us took out student loans and got our degrees. All of us made sacrificies along the way. I can honestly say that we have achieved the american dream. The house, the kids, and yes even the dog lol. It is possible. All one needs is the drive and dedication.

I have 4 cousins (all siblings) who didnt have the parental guidance that my siblings and I had. Dad was a dead beat and mom was a drug addict, yet today 3 of them are doing equally as well as my siblings and I. Our success is determined by the choices we make and the desire we have. 

Sooooo if you have a success story, please share. I know we cant be the only ones. 

Posted by Anonymous on Mar. 30, 2016 at 6:18 PM
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Replies (1-10):
Anonymous
by Anonymous 2 on Mar. 30, 2016 at 6:25 PM
I'd say I'm a success. I dropped out of college opting to work instead. I got married at 20 had ds at 21 and kept working. I realized that I needed a more professional job to teach me skills I'd need to be successful. I've worked hard for the last 7 years and last year I finally bagged a great job. A growing company with a known name, great pay, benefits and a focus on employee happiness.

My dh and I bought our first house last year, we take a vacation every year (small vacations but so much fun), we have a savings and for the first time aren't struggling to just pay the bills.
Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on Mar. 30, 2016 at 7:33 PM
That's awesome!!! I love hearing these stories. Way to go. It's an amazing feeling, isn't it?

Quoting Anonymous 2: I'd say I'm a success. I dropped out of college opting to work instead. I got married at 20 had ds at 21 and kept working. I realized that I needed a more professional job to teach me skills I'd need to be successful. I've worked hard for the last 7 years and last year I finally bagged a great job. A growing company with a known name, great pay, benefits and a focus on employee happiness.

My dh and I bought our first house last year, we take a vacation every year (small vacations but so much fun), we have a savings and for the first time aren't struggling to just pay the bills.
Anonymous
by Anonymous 3 on Mar. 30, 2016 at 7:34 PM
1 mom liked this
Born dirt poor. Dropped out of hs and got a GED.

Then I married a rich man, and here I am now.
SRUsarahSC
by Ruby Member on Mar. 30, 2016 at 7:37 PM

Statistically, there are three indicators that really go a long way towards overall success and they are to at least graduate from high school, work full time, and be married before you have kids.  Read it in a study years ago.  Seems to hold true for people I know, especially the kid one.  

bluebunnybabe
by kid crack dealer on Mar. 30, 2016 at 7:38 PM
You're not the only one. πŸ˜€
I'm also first generation American, my parents came here with pretty much nothing & they (although separately lol) have achieved the dream & are now comfortably retired. I feel like I have made it & my kids are also making their way & doing well for themselves & their families. It's still there, you just have to get out there & get it.
Anonymous
by Anonymous 4 on Mar. 30, 2016 at 7:40 PM
1 mom liked this
My hubby is one-
His mom abandoned him when he was 2. He was left with his alcoholic father and he was working all the time. Hubby was worked to the bone, even as a small child and even got a hernia from chopping wood when he was 6. Anyways he went was only child out of 4 to graduate high school and go into army, then made it into special forces. He busted his ass. Now he is a plumber. He makes 70k a year right now and he wants to open his own plumbing business in a couple years. He has ptsd, traumatic brain injury and abandonment issues big time. He's fought hard to prove to himself he can do it. It's awesome. No one would believe me if I told him where he came from.
Anonymous
by Anonymous 5 on Mar. 30, 2016 at 7:45 PM
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I was the one that everyone thought would get married and have kids right after high school. Life didn't work that way. I went through crappy jobs and got my break into working in my field. They paid for me to get my Bachelor's degree and my Master's. I graduated in the top of my class in both of those degrees. In high school I barely passed and it shocked people.

After a bad divorce and break up I made a decision to move. I started my life over alone in a strange city with very little support. People told me that I should t do it blah blah. I thumbed my nose and did it. It wasn't easy actually had a few speed bumps. Pushing through the bad I now work in a position I love and supporting a great customer. I stay constantly busy actually non-stop. I moved to FL in January because I have wanted to.

A lot of people look at my life now and think she is so lucky but they have no idea how painful it has been. The heartaches and rejection a long the way.

Now I am getting ready to attend a boot camp class for CISSP and will finish it.
Anonymous
by Anonymous 6 on Mar. 30, 2016 at 8:25 PM

 I was born in a two room shack in Appalachia (think Dolly Parton or Loretta Lynn) poor. There were 5 of us kids. We grew our own food and borrowed a mule to pull the plow for our garden. My mother sewed our clothes. My parents took a chance, moved to a large city, and both worked two jobs for years. They taught us the importance of hard work and education. My older sister got pregnant and married at 16. She had 3 kids by the time she was 20. Finished high school, got a job at a large corporation, as a file clerk. Divorced and was a single mom. When she retired, she was one of the top executives in the country. My brother became a mechanic and was named the top truck mechanic in his state, and then worked for a race . Another brother worked for an auto plant, received training as a machinist and later moved to a nuclear power plant, where he became a an international consultant. I worked and went to college, had three years of college completed when my  husband became disabled, and I became the only breadwinner, caregiver and then later a mom.  My husband died when my boys were teenagers.  I worked as a waitress, then opened my own restaurant, which became a success, and later opened a catering and wedding and event planning business, which has provided a very good living for my family. Everyone has been successful. It's hard, and there are many things you have to give up in the beginning, but it is worth it in the end. When we get together, the talk all comes around to how grateful we are for what we have. Our kids are all doing well, and I think they will achieve more in the future that we have.  

Anonymous
by Anonymous 6 on Mar. 30, 2016 at 8:37 PM

 My dh was first generation. His father became a barber and later opened his own small shop. Dh started working at a tv station his last year in college in the billing dept. He later moved to the network headquarters and  became head of the billing dept at age 23, and when he was able to retire at age 50, he was a vice-president in charge of contract negotiations between the local tv stations and the national network. Pretty successful life.

Anonymous
by Anonymous 2 on Mar. 30, 2016 at 8:46 PM
Thanks it does feel good and also being successful without the crippling debt of student loans is better.

Quoting Anonymous 1: That's awesome!!! I love hearing these stories. Way to go. It's an amazing feeling, isn't it?

Quoting Anonymous 2: I'd say I'm a success. I dropped out of college opting to work instead. I got married at 20 had ds at 21 and kept working. I realized that I needed a more professional job to teach me skills I'd need to be successful. I've worked hard for the last 7 years and last year I finally bagged a great job. A growing company with a known name, great pay, benefits and a focus on employee happiness.

My dh and I bought our first house last year, we take a vacation every year (small vacations but so much fun), we have a savings and for the first time aren't struggling to just pay the bills.
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