Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

Ugh..the parents at my kid's school

Anonymous
Posted by Anonymous
  • 14 Replies

My daughter goes to a charter school. We love the school. Our daughter has been here since Kindergarten and my husband worked for the school for several years (prior to our daughter starting).

It's charted through the local university and its a multi-age school that is teacher lead. So different age groups are in the same class.

When DD started at the school the grades were k/1, 2/3, 4/5 and 6-8th grade.

With enrollment being down and several teachings moving on to better opportunities, the school and the board had to make some decisions. What the school decided was that the grade groups would be k-2, 3-5 and then 6-8. It was the original way the school had started before they grew bigger and got a bigger bulding.

We had a meeting to discuss the changes. Only a handful of parents showed up to the meeting.

While I understand some of he concerns (the school is struggling to find a music teacher), other concerns annoyed me.

The school doesn't have a principal. It doesn't need one. One parent (no matter how many times it was brought away from that subject) kept bringing up a principal.

I pointed out that through the years there has always been a principal and that person lasted a year or less . When they finally did away with the principal and had the two co-leaders of the school, things got better. More stable.

Another thing that was brought up (which I understand is a concern, especially with low enrollment) is the possibility of the school closing. The school leaders obviously wouldn't comment on that (and couldn't). I finally got fed up and pointed out that yes, there is a possibility that the school could close. But then I pointed out that our local school district has closed two elementary schools over the summer without any notice and that they had consolidated two school districts while closing all of these schools. That there is never any guarantee that a school will remain open whether it's our school or a public school. We choose to send our kids to this school.

An average fifth grade class is 35 students in the school district. The average class sizes for our school is 20.

Posted by Anonymous on Aug. 18, 2016 at 6:31 PM
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Replies (1-10):
krazymom2boyz
by Platinum Member on Aug. 18, 2016 at 6:39 PM
I've never heard of a school grouping kids like that. I'm not sure I would be ok with it. There's a big maturity gap in those ages and grades. How does it work? How old is your daughter?
peanutsmommy1
by Ruby Member on Aug. 18, 2016 at 6:43 PM
We left a mixed grade school mid year last year. The proportion of kids was tipped towards the younger grade and the older kids, my sons class, were falling behind because the teacher couldn't pay them the attention they needed
kgsharber
by Platinum Member on Aug. 18, 2016 at 6:43 PM
That grouping would never fly for me. I'm a teacher and know that this set up will greatly benefit the younger ones and disservice the older.
Anonymous
by Anonymous 2 on Aug. 18, 2016 at 6:46 PM

Don't give them money!  Also, I would have your child tested for free at the public school. We left public school for three  years and our youngest went from 100% on state tests to being below.

Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on Aug. 18, 2016 at 6:48 PM

My daughter is in the fifth grade.

So what will happen is that they are going to group the kids more by ability then by grade level (while still teaching grade level academics).

So there are 2.5 teachers in each age group. two main teaches and then another teacher that comes in to help.

What's nice about this is that it allows students to work together (older kids help younger kids, which they have already do).

My DD, for example, is at a 7th gradel level for math. So they actually send her to do math in the middle school grade.

Reading however, she's at a 4th grade level. So she's slightly below average for her grade.

Math and reading will be separated by ability, but not by grade level. So there might be a grouping of 3rd graders with 5th graders in math, and the possibility of 5th graders in a level with third graders (not likely though. That child would probably just get extra help.

Quoting krazymom2boyz: I've never heard of a school grouping kids like that. I'm not sure I would be ok with it. There's a big maturity gap in those ages and grades. How does it work? How old is your daughter?


cybcm
by Ruby Member on Aug. 18, 2016 at 6:50 PM
That's extremely common where I live. I'm in a semi-rural area in Australia and I've never known a school that didn't have composite classes, my son's school has Prep (kindergarten) alone then 1/2, 3/4 and 5/6. Their class sizes are 15-20 kids. The Australian government actually has a style for composite curriculum, it's that common here.

Some of the smaller schools in the area group them further though. One school that I onow of has 18 kids between P-6, so they have only three classes, a stand alone Prep, then 1-3 and 4-6.

I've never encountered a school without a principal though.
Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on Aug. 18, 2016 at 6:51 PM

My husband is a teacher as well and he's excited about it. Though I can totally understand that concern. It was one of our concerns when they brought up the three levels instead of two, but after the meeting we were feeling more confidant.

Quoting kgsharber: That grouping would never fly for me. I'm a teacher and know that this set up will greatly benefit the younger ones and disservice the older.


krazymom2boyz
by Platinum Member on Aug. 18, 2016 at 6:51 PM
It seems like a interesting way to go about it. It's not something I think my kids would benefit from bit of it works for you guys, then cool!

Quoting Anonymous 1:

My daughter is in the fifth grade. So what will happen is that they are going to group the kids more by ability then by grade level (while still teaching grade level academics). So there are 2.5 teachers in each age group. two main teaches and then another teacher that comes in to help. What's nice about this is that it allows students to work together (older kids help younger kids, which they have already do). My DD, for example, is at a 7th gradel level for math. So they actually send her to do math in the middle school grade.Reading however, she's at a 4th grade level. So she's slightly below average for her grade. Math and reading will be separated by ability, but not by grade level. So there might be a grouping of 3rd graders with 5th graders in math, and the possibility of 5th graders in a level with third graders (not likely though. That child would probably just get extra help.

Quoting krazymom2boyz: I've never heard of a school grouping kids like that. I'm not sure I would be ok with it. There's a big maturity gap in those ages and grades. How does it work? How old is your daughter?

Anonymous
by Anonymous 3 on Aug. 18, 2016 at 6:52 PM
How is this school rated?

Everything you wrote sounds awful, except charter by university (my dd goes to one of those).
Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on Aug. 18, 2016 at 6:59 PM

Not the highest, about average, but the way the school is run isn't for everyone. We supplement a lot at home and what she gets out of emotionally is so awesome.

Many people want a principal and dislike the concept of a teacher-lead school. The multi-age groups are something else that turns people away.

This is new for us, so we're interested to see how it turns out. After looking at the plan and the research we're pretty excited.

Quoting Anonymous 3: How is this school rated? Everything you wrote sounds awful, except charter by university (my dd goes to one of those).


Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)