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More Money Equals Better Schools

Anonymous
Posted by Anonymous
  • 48 Replies
Do you believe this? My sister, let's call her Lynn, lives in H-ville. She and I grew up in this town, as did her spouse and their children. It's a very affluent town, high property taxes which fund the schools, majority of families are college educated, two parent homes, white, and speak English as their first language. The high school that her children attended is 84 percent white, median income is 160,000 a year (high for our county), student to teacher ratio is 9:1, and they spend a lot per pupil. I live in E-town, which is not exactly the inner city, but close. Our taxes here are low, majority of families are from broken homes, immigrants who English is their second language, work minimum wage jobs with no college education, and we are 70 percent minority population. Median income in E-town is 90,000, student to teacher ratio is 16:1, and 77 percent of our student body receives free or reduced lunch.
H-ville has an abysmal graduation rate of 40 percent, while E-town is 86 percent. Likewise, SAT and ACT scores are above the national average in E-town, while H-ville's scores are far below the national average. We score higher in reading and math proficiency, as well as college preparedness.
Neither my sister or I graduated from H-ville, although we did later earn our GED. Her husband did graduate but did not go to college and works making decent money as a tradesman. Their children have all graduated, 3 of them just barely, and none of them have been to college, although the one does go to trade school. My children, who attended school in E-town, graduated early, with honors, at the top of their class, even my special needs one. Both have received full rides to college, where they've been doing very well. So my question is do you believe that the more money a district has, the more affluent an area is, the better the school system? I do not
Posted by Anonymous on Sep. 7, 2016 at 11:50 PM
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Anonymous
by Anonymous 2 on Sep. 7, 2016 at 11:53 PM
In terms of the programs they can offer. Yes.

However in my own personal experience affluent parents are not generally as involved. Because poor parents WANT their kids to not be poor they push them to do better. Affluent parents and kids havent been poor so they dont go the extra mile.
Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on Sep. 7, 2016 at 11:55 PM
This is an interesting theory and one I could believe. It did seem to me that the parents in our area were much stricter about who their kids friends were and where they were allowed to go, etc.

Quoting Anonymous 2: In terms of the programs they can offer. Yes.

However in my own personal experience affluent parents are not generally as involved. Because poor parents WANT their kids to not be poor they push them to do better. Affluent parents and kids havent been poor so they dont go the extra mile.
Anonymous
by Anonymous 3 on Sep. 7, 2016 at 11:58 PM
2 moms liked this

The more involved parents are in their kids' lives, the more successful the kids will be in school. No amount of money can buy that...

Not a teacher but my mom and sis are - combined they have 50 years of teaching experience. They both say the #1 predictor of school success is parental involvement -- parents who are supportive of their kids, parents who have expectations of their kids and parents who know what their kids are up to and who they're hanging out with.

You can throw money at it, but it'll never fix the problem of kids without supportive parents.

Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on Sep. 8, 2016 at 12:01 AM
I believe this one hundred percent. But I will also admit that the school district my children attended had some truly wonderful teachers, as in I'd be willing to say most of them, while my sister and I and her children had some that were great, some that were bad, but most were just ok.

Quoting Anonymous 3:

The more involved parents are in their kids' lives, the more successful the kids will be in school. No amount of money can buy that...

Not a teacher but my mom and sis are - combined they have 50 years of teaching experience. They both say the #1 predictor of school success is parental involvement -- parents who are supportive of their kids, parents who have expectations of their kids and parents who know what their kids are up to and who they're hanging out with.

You can throw money at it, but it'll never fix the problem of kids without supportive parents.

silvermermaid
by Allison on Sep. 8, 2016 at 12:05 AM
100%- this. Last year my son's second grade teacher told me she can tell right away whose parents are involved in their child's education (as in supplementing at home, talking to them about their day and discussing conflict resolutions or social issues, should there be any) compared to parents who are not. My mom was a K-2 teacher with a Master's in early childhood and she says the same thing.



Quoting Anonymous 3:

The more involved parents are in their kids' lives, the more successful the kids will be in school. No amount of money can buy that...

Not a teacher but my mom and sis are - combined they have 50 years of teaching experience. They both say the #1 predictor of school success is parental involvement -- parents who are supportive of their kids, parents who have expectations of their kids and parents who know what their kids are up to and who they're hanging out with.

You can throw money at it, but it'll never fix the problem of kids without supportive parents.

Anonymous
by Anonymous 4 on Sep. 8, 2016 at 12:06 AM
Where do you live that a median income of 90,000 is practically the inner city?
Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on Sep. 8, 2016 at 12:06 AM
So do you believe as a pp does that parents who come from poverty sometimes push their children much harder and as such may be more involved than parents who are more affluent?

Quoting silvermermaid: 100%- this. Last year my son's second grade teacher told me she can tell right away whose parents are involved in their child's education (as in supplementing at home, talking to them about their day and discussing conflict resolutions or social issues, should there be any) compared to parents who are not. My mom was a K-2 teacher with a Master's in early childhood and she says the same thing.



Quoting Anonymous 3:

The more involved parents are in their kids' lives, the more successful the kids will be in school. No amount of money can buy that...

Not a teacher but my mom and sis are - combined they have 50 years of teaching experience. They both say the #1 predictor of school success is parental involvement -- parents who are supportive of their kids, parents who have expectations of their kids and parents who know what their kids are up to and who they're hanging out with.

You can throw money at it, but it'll never fix the problem of kids without supportive parents.

Anonymous
by Anonymous 3 on Sep. 8, 2016 at 12:07 AM
1 mom liked this


Quoting silvermermaid: 100%- this. Last year my son's second grade teacher told me she can tell right away whose parents are involved in their child's education (as in supplementing at home, talking to them about their day and discussing conflict resolutions or social issues, should there be any) compared to parents who are not. My mom was a K-2 teacher with a Master's in early childhood and she says the same thing.
Quoting Anonymous 3:

The more involved parents are in their kids' lives, the more successful the kids will be in school. No amount of money can buy that...

Not a teacher but my mom and sis are - combined they have 50 years of teaching experience. They both say the #1 predictor of school success is parental involvement -- parents who are supportive of their kids, parents who have expectations of their kids and parents who know what their kids are up to and who they're hanging out with.

You can throw money at it, but it'll never fix the problem of kids without supportive parents.

Absolutely, my mom and sis knew also know within a week of starting school what they were dealing with... for better or for worse.

Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on Sep. 8, 2016 at 12:08 AM
New Jersey. It isn't the inner city, it's a suburb. It's not exactly low income, but there are many communities in our state that are much more affluent, including the town my sister lives in.

Quoting Anonymous 4: Where do you live that a median income of 90,000 is practically the inner city?
Rosehawk
by Platinum Member on Sep. 8, 2016 at 12:08 AM

To an extent, yes. But not always. Just look at Bellevue, WA. A high school there has been fined and sanctioned byWIAA for illegally recruiting football players and cooking books. Bellevue is one of the richer towns in the state.

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