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How did you know your child had Dyslexia

Anonymous
Posted by Anonymous
  • 10 Replies

My son has had trouble reading and writing since Kindergarten. He has had help for the past 2 years (he is in 2nd grade now) with reading and it is still not really helping. I've looked up symptoms of it and he seems to have a lot of them but my husband believes that he is just being lazy so I am going this alone for now. I've never known anyone...or at least not that I know of...that has had Dyslexia or a parent of anyone who has so i am a little lost on this. How did you know that your child might be Dyslexic and what did you do from there? I am under the impression that my next step would be to talk to his PM about a referral to a specialist (tricare) but what else should I be doing? 



***before anyone bashes my husband about not being supportive, I've read that this is a common response from people when their child has it undiagnosed and is very intelligent. It is a misconception that dyslexics see things backwards or that they are intellectually stunted. I know that if this diagnosis happens, I will be buying a ton of books to educate both of us on the realities of it.

Posted by Anonymous on Nov. 1, 2016 at 3:22 PM
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Anonymous
by Anonymous 2 on Nov. 1, 2016 at 3:33 PM
My step mom started telling me when dd was 3 that she strongly suspected that she had it then when dd was in 1st grade I had a wonderful teacher that saw the signs in her and brought in another teacher that has taken all the extra classes and training to understand dyslexia to tutor dd. Those 2 teachers helped me get her in the list to get tested. She was on the waiting list with Scottish Rights for over a year. I finally found a place that I paid out of pocket to test her.
Traci_Momof2
by Ruby Member on Nov. 1, 2016 at 3:33 PM

Talk to your doctor but also talk to the school.  The school should (assuming public) do testing on him at your request to test how behind he is on reading, writing, math.  Then if he tests far enough behind he will qualify for services through the school district.

I have the same concerns about my son and I went to my doctor for a referral for private testing.  She said I should go back to the school and keep pushing them to do testing.  It's a requirement of the public school district, you just have to push hard enough sometimes.

Either way, even if you go through private testing, take all of the results back to the school (assuming he tests positive for it or something else) and work on getting an IEP for your son.  Get him the accomodations that he needs so that his learning disability doesn't interfere with his ability to learn.

Raeann11
by Emerald Member on Nov. 1, 2016 at 3:36 PM

I have it and my oldest had lot of the same things I had going on. I mentioned it when she was younger. We had to wait till she was 8/9 to test in school. The school can't give her that label but give it another name. If we want to pay a bunch or money for a specialist we can but won't. She is getting the help she needs in school. Since she has other learning disabilities it wasn't an issue to get her tested. We all saw it and had to wait till certain things could no longer be written off as her age.

Careeka22
by Caitlin on Nov. 1, 2016 at 3:38 PM

My sister was dyslexic. My mom knew because she only struggled to read, she would fight reading and hated every minute of it. My mom got a tutor for her around 1st grade and it helped but she never really did "enjoy" reading like I did. She graduated with a dual criminal justice degree for a top college, became a cop and now is waiting on the birth of her first daughter. Top of her class. She was never lazy, but she did fight doing the work because she had to work harder at it.

Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on Nov. 1, 2016 at 4:05 PM


Quoting Anonymous 2: My step mom started telling me when dd was 3 that she strongly suspected that she had it then when dd was in 1st grade I had a wonderful teacher that saw the signs in her and brought in another teacher that has taken all the extra classes and training to understand dyslexia to tutor dd. Those 2 teachers helped me get her in the list to get tested. She was on the waiting list with Scottish Rights for over a year. I finally found a place that I paid out of pocket to test her.

I have a teacher conference coming up this week and I plan on talking to the teacher about it and bringing the checklist with me. Thank you

Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on Nov. 1, 2016 at 4:09 PM


Quoting Traci_Momof2:

Talk to your doctor but also talk to the school.  The school should (assuming public) do testing on him at your request to test how behind he is on reading, writing, math.  Then if he tests far enough behind he will qualify for services through the school district.

I have the same concerns about my son and I went to my doctor for a referral for private testing.  She said I should go back to the school and keep pushing them to do testing.  It's a requirement of the public school district, you just have to push hard enough sometimes.

Either way, even if you go through private testing, take all of the results back to the school (assuming he tests positive for it or something else) and work on getting an IEP for your son.  Get him the accomodations that he needs so that his learning disability doesn't interfere with his ability to learn.

thanks. He has a special reading class he goes to to help focus on reading but its been 2 years and it isn't helping very much. I read that there is a different reading program that has been used to help people with this problem though and that is why i was thinking that if I got an official diagnosis then they could start implementing that strategy instead. He is in a DoD school so I am not sure how it will all work as far as them testing him but I will be asking about it this week at the parent/teacher conference.

Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on Nov. 1, 2016 at 4:12 PM


Quoting Raeann11:

I have it and my oldest had lot of the same things I had going on. I mentioned it when she was younger. We had to wait till she was 8/9 to test in school. The school can't give her that label but give it another name. If we want to pay a bunch or money for a specialist we can but won't. She is getting the help she needs in school. Since she has other learning disabilities it wasn't an issue to get her tested. We all saw it and had to wait till certain things could no longer be written off as her age.

I hope that I can get a referral so that the insurance will pay for the testing but if not then we will see what we have to do. We move every 3 years or so so I know I need some official paperwork to help push any new school he goes to into helping him the way that he needs it. This school has been very involved in trying to help him up to this point, I am not sure if they have any specific training in Dyslexia though and his last school was a nightmare.

Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on Nov. 1, 2016 at 4:15 PM
1 mom liked this


Quoting Careeka22:

My sister was dyslexic. My mom knew because she only struggled to read, she would fight reading and hated every minute of it. My mom got a tutor for her around 1st grade and it helped but she never really did "enjoy" reading like I did. She graduated with a dual criminal justice degree for a top college, became a cop and now is waiting on the birth of her first daughter. Top of her class. She was never lazy, but she did fight doing the work because she had to work harder at it.

He has problems with reading and writing as well as confusing some of his letters still. He picks up on everything quickly but when it comes to this I feel like he has hit a road block. They do have an extra reading class for him to go to to try to help the problem and I do believe if it weren't for it his problem would be worse but I think at this point that class has done all it can do and he is going to need some specialised instruction. I am glad to hear your sister did so well. I know there are a good deal of successful people with it and I know that if he does have it he can still be successful in his future as well I just feel a lot of pressure to get the help he needs now so that he won't fall to far behind.

ReedusStalker
by 11-15/3-27 on Nov. 1, 2016 at 4:23 PM

When I was in kindergarten, they knew. I couldn't read.  I wrote my letters upside and back wards.  No one would read what I wrote but I could.  

Anonymous
by Anonymous 2 on Nov. 1, 2016 at 4:50 PM
Your welcome. I had a crash course in it once dd got her diagnosis. Her 2nd grade was rough to deal with after the diagnosis. She kept telling me that she doesn't have dyslexia that her problems had to do with attention and impulse issues. I finally got her an Iep and now that 3rd grade has started the teachers are wonderful on understanding and trying to help her. Alabama has just recently started it where the public schools is to have someone to help kids with it and to do the screening that has to be done. Her handwriting suffers from it as well.

Quoting Anonymous 1:

Quoting Anonymous 2: My step mom started telling me when dd was 3 that she strongly suspected that she had it then when dd was in 1st grade I had a wonderful teacher that saw the signs in her and brought in another teacher that has taken all the extra classes and training to understand dyslexia to tutor dd. Those 2 teachers helped me get her in the list to get tested. She was on the waiting list with Scottish Rights for over a year. I finally found a place that I paid out of pocket to test her.

I have a teacher conference coming up this week and I plan on talking to the teacher about it and bringing the checklist with me. Thank you

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