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Hollywood has long shown discomfort with interracial couples, but change is happening

Posted by on Nov. 11, 2016 at 2:42 PM
  • 6 Replies
http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/envelope/la-en-mn-1110-race-relations-films-20161109-snap-20161110-story.html

Interesting article (sent to me by my SIL, sharing...because anything that isn't the election is good)

One way the industry dealt with the issue was in a series of so-called “tragic mulatto” storylines in films such as “Show Boat” (1936), “Pinky” (1949) and “Imitation of Life” (1959), in which light-skinned blacks – always played by white actresses – cross the color line and pass as white until their “true” race is discovered and tragedy ensues. “The mulatto can pass, and infiltrate into the culture, and prove the lie in white culture because she can pass and be successful,” says Bogle. “But the mulatto is tormented and is a warning that the races shouldn’t mix.”

But if the races did mix – as in the 1957 “Band of Angels,” in which a white slave owner (Clark Gable) puts the moves on a mulatto woman (played, of course, by a white actress, Yvonne De Carlo) – it is almost always white man, black woman. Black man, white woman is the ultimate taboo.
White men who run Hollywood make these films,” says Pollard, “and these white male, black woman relationships are easier for them to digest.”

“This goes to gender politics,” adds Bogle. “The black penis is so threatening, it calls into question white manhood and white power. And the idea that the white woman is on a pedestal and the black man will defile her, this becomes threatening.
Yet Bogle feels that filmmakers are still trying to come to grips with black-white romance. “Societal attitudes and opposition to interracial marriages, that’s one thing,” he says. But films still “don’t indicate that in interracial marriages there are cultural bridges people have to cross in order for the relationship to work. That’s something that can be enlightening; what we learn about one another in this kind of relationship.”



by on Nov. 11, 2016 at 2:42 PM
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Replies (1-6):
bubbs0809
by Emerald Member on Nov. 11, 2016 at 2:44 PM
I just posted pieces, I don't know if I agree.
It's seems normal for my life (not just my current relationship, I never considered it had any implications from the first celebrity crush)

MixedCooke
by Ruby Member on Nov. 11, 2016 at 4:01 PM
1 mom liked this
There's that new movie Loving that looks good.
bubbs0809
by Emerald Member on Nov. 12, 2016 at 11:57 AM
I do want to see that

Quoting MixedCooke: There's that new movie Loving that looks good.
PinkButterfly66
by Sapphire Member on Nov. 12, 2016 at 1:15 PM
1 mom liked this

And all the Indians in those western were white guys in really bad wigs and a lot of them were jewish.  It was a different time, before the civil rights and interracial marriages were actually illegal in some states. 

Sidney Portier starred in two such movies in the 60's-- "Guess Who's Coming to Dinner" about an interracial relationship and "A Patch of Blue" about a black man befriending and protecting a young blind woman.   Anyone see those movies?  

Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 on Nov. 12, 2016 at 1:20 PM
Those are two of my favorite movies.

Quoting PinkButterfly66:

And all the Indians in those western were white guys in really bad wigs and a lot of them were jewish.  It was a different time, before the civil rights and interracial marriages were actually illegal in some states. 

Sidney Portier starred in two such movies in the 60's-- "Guess Who's Coming to Dinner" about an interracial relationship and "A Patch of Blue" about a black man befriending and protecting a young blind woman.   Anyone see those movies?  

bubbs0809
by Emerald Member on Nov. 12, 2016 at 1:34 PM
I like Guess who's coming to dinner? a lot
I need to look up the other one


Quoting PinkButterfly66:

And all the Indians in those western were white guys in really bad wigs and a lot of them were jewish.  It was a different time, before the civil rights and interracial marriages were actually illegal in some states. 

Sidney Portier starred in two such movies in the 60's-- "Guess Who's Coming to Dinner" about an interracial relationship and "A Patch of Blue" about a black man befriending and protecting a young blind woman.   Anyone see those movies?  

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