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Most Harebrained Question EVER

Posted by on Nov. 11, 2016 at 8:19 PM
  • 10 Replies

We have a giant tree stump in the back yard.  Hurricane Sandy took down our giant swamp maple.  The root ball stood as tall as the garage.  We were able to get the tree cut up and removed immediately after, but the stump and roots were flipped back down and it's been a trial trying to get it removed...narrow access to the yard, a deal fell through...all besides the point.

The point is that bunnies have been recently spotted in the neighborhood and I suspect they live in the gaps under the stump.  We finally have a guy coming next week to grind down the stump.  Now, if the bunnies gotta die, then they gotta die.  I'm a realist.  BUT, I have a neighbor girl in my class...3 years old...and I've recently learned that she is in the habit of feeding the bunnies and looking for them at dusk and all that.

Sigh.

How do I get the bunnies to leave their home and not come back?  I'm thinking to throw a bunch of moth balls into whatever gaps I can.

Any better ideas? 

Don't text and drive.  

by on Nov. 11, 2016 at 8:19 PM
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Replies (1-10):
MrsBieg
by Platinum Member on Nov. 11, 2016 at 8:36 PM

Angel89411
by on Nov. 11, 2016 at 8:39 PM
Go to a hunting store and see if you can find Fox urine. Poor it in the area. The smell should drive them away and keep them out.
Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 on Nov. 11, 2016 at 8:41 PM
When the person comes next week just ask them to run what ever machine for a minute before actually going to town at the stump. When he touches the stump with the machine they will all run out anyways.
white_wolf454
by Ruby Member on Nov. 11, 2016 at 8:45 PM
2 moms liked this

Reduce the areas where rabbits like to hide. Because rabbits will hide in accumulations of vegetation, a great way to deter rabbits is to keep your grass mowed short, remove any unnecessary vegetation such as tall grasses, and clean up plant debris regularly. Also, be sure to trim off and discard low-hanging bottom branches on bushes and shrubs, which rabbits may use for cover. Finally, fill in any existing burrows you may find on your property.[1]

  • Tour your property regularly to find potential sites of infestation as well as burrows that need covering.
  • Check sites where you have taken measures to deter rabbits on a regular basis to maintain control over these areas.

Plant as many rabbit-deterring plants as possible. Few plants will be off-limits to rabbits as food, but some are certainly on the lower end of desirability, and planting these might encourage rabbits to go elsewhere in search of food. These undesirables include annuals such as goatweed, impatiens, and verbena, perennials like echinacea and honeysuckle, and groundcover such as big periwinkle and bougainvillea. Combined with perennials and annuals, shrubs like rhododendrons and camellias can offer an extra deterrent.

Install automatic, motion-activated sprinklers. Automatic, motion-activated sprinklers condition rabbits to stay out of the area by spraying them with water every time they move into the sensor's range. Some of these sprinklers not only spray a burst of water to deter rabbits, but also emit a sound that is annoying to rabbits. This option is also environmentally friendly and humane because it does not use any chemicals—only water and sound. These sprinkler systems are available in hardware stores and online and they are fairly easy to set up, generally staking into the ground much like a standard sprinkler used for watering your lawn

Use commercially available repellents. Many different repellents may be available, but no repellent will work on all rabbits, so you may have to try several before finding one that works for you. Remember that some repellents may have to be applied more than once per season.[10] Some repellents include:

  • Blood or bone meal fertilizer. Blood or bone meal fertilizer repels rabbits because they are natural herbivores, and, as an added bonus, these fertilizers are great for your garden.[11]
  • Chemical repellents. Some chemical repellents like ammonium soaps can help deter rabbits, but they may not be safe for the more delicate plants in the garden, so be sure to read the label. A solution containing the bitter Bitrex can also be sprayed to deter rabbits, but generally only if the garden is made up of flowers because Bitrex will alter the taste of vegetables.

Use household repellents. Cayenne pepper, human hair, dog hair, or manure on the ground near the garden or mixed with fertilizer can help deter rabbits. You can also spray vegetables with a mixture of vinegar and water with a small amount of hot sauce mixed in as well. [12]This mixture sprayed on vegetables make the are unattractive to rabbits and may make the vegetables distasteful as well.

  • Dried sulfur and onions can also be effective repellents against rabbits
beeky
by Platinum Member on Nov. 11, 2016 at 8:47 PM
Get a fox.
MrsBieg
by Platinum Member on Nov. 11, 2016 at 8:53 PM


Quoting Angel89411: Go to a hunting store and see if you can find Fox urine. Poor it in the area. The smell should drive them away and keep them out.

This is such a great idea.  

Don't text and drive.  

MrsBieg
by Platinum Member on Nov. 11, 2016 at 8:55 PM


Quoting Anonymous 1: When the person comes next week just ask them to run what ever machine for a minute before actually going to town at the stump. When he touches the stump with the machine they will all run out anyways.

That's what my husband said.  I was worried they might try to squish down deeper.  

Don't text and drive.  

Crazy-Steph
by Emerald Member on Nov. 11, 2016 at 8:57 PM
Lol

Quoting beeky: Get a fox.
Anonymous
by Anonymous 2 on Nov. 11, 2016 at 8:59 PM
I see what you did there...
Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 on Nov. 11, 2016 at 9:07 PM
1 mom liked this
No they should run out, as they get keep cutting they will feel the shaking and run. If they run in farther they will learn and run out. They can only cut so much off at a time so most if not all should have a chance to run. If the little girl loves them so much maybe talk to her mom and let her know you think they hide under the stump and you are getting it removed and wanted to let her know so if they wanted to maybe build a hiding spot for them in their yard so they stick around. We have 3 that live under our cars and and I always smack the hood a few times so they run before I start my car.

Quoting MrsBieg:

Quoting Anonymous 1: When the person comes next week just ask them to run what ever machine for a minute before actually going to town at the stump. When he touches the stump with the machine they will all run out anyways.

That's what my husband said.  I was worried they might try to squish down deeper.  

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