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Is there Really More Autism Now, or is it just 'Better Diagnosis'??

Anonymous
Posted by Anonymous
  • 27 Replies

Are there really more cases of autism now, than 20yrs ago, -   OR, are kids just being diagnosed willy nilly, which would/could explain the increase.

What do you think?

Posted by Anonymous on Feb. 15, 2017 at 10:45 AM
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Replies (1-10):
Becsmom217
by Silver Member on Feb. 15, 2017 at 10:47 AM

I think it is multiple things.  Better diagnosis and just because the child is different

OwlNuggets
by HAIL NUGGY! on Feb. 15, 2017 at 10:49 AM

My grandmother told me a story once about a boy who lived in her community and how his parents kept him in the house as much as possible and nobody really knew what was wrong with him...She realized decades later he probably had severe autism.

Tinse
by Crazy Bird Lady on Feb. 15, 2017 at 10:49 AM

Over-diagnosis.

Not_A_Native
by Ruby Member on Feb. 15, 2017 at 10:51 AM

I think it's many things.

In the past, many of these kids were institutionalized, so you didn't "see" them.

There are better diagnostic tools, not to mention over diagnoses, since, hey, all those diagnosed get therapy which someone is making money from.  And you get minor "quirks" that are now labeled and treated.

And I think there are also actually more cases - could be anything.  Processed food (maybe even what the mother or father ate as a child).  Routine sonograms.  Lack of natural immunities.  Anti-bacterial everything.

Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on Feb. 15, 2017 at 10:53 AM

institutions were few and far between and families sometimes had to send their child hundreds of miles away -  we didn't have institutions ALL over the usa for autistic kids.  

Quoting Not_A_Native:

I think it's many things.

In the past, many of these kids were institutionalized, so you didn't "see" them.

There are better diagnostic tools, not to mention over diagnoses, since, hey, all those diagnosed get therapy which someone is making money from.  And you get minor "quirks" that are now labeled and treated.

And I think there are also actually more cases - could be anything.  Processed food (maybe even what the mother or father ate as a child).  Routine sonograms.  Lack of natural immunities.  Anti-bacterial everything.


Not_A_Native
by Ruby Member on Feb. 15, 2017 at 10:56 AM

20 years ago, you're probably right.  40 years ago, yes, they would send those kids to institutions - yes, 100's of miles away - and many times the parents never visited, just turned their care over to the state.

Quoting Anonymous 1:

institutions were few and far between and families sometimes had to send their child hundreds of miles away -  we didn't have institutions ALL over the usa for autistic kids.  

Quoting Not_A_Native:

I think it's many things.

In the past, many of these kids were institutionalized, so you didn't "see" them.

There are better diagnostic tools, not to mention over diagnoses, since, hey, all those diagnosed get therapy which someone is making money from.  And you get minor "quirks" that are now labeled and treated.

And I think there are also actually more cases - could be anything.  Processed food (maybe even what the mother or father ate as a child).  Routine sonograms.  Lack of natural immunities.  Anti-bacterial everything.



Anonymous
by Anonymous 2 on Feb. 15, 2017 at 10:57 AM
Both
Anonymous
by Anonymous 3 on Feb. 15, 2017 at 10:58 AM

Def both

Anonymous
by Anonymous 4 on Feb. 15, 2017 at 11:03 AM
I do think over diagnosis is an issue. I have two neurotypical but somewhat quirky teens. When both were three, two separate peds tried to pressure me to get them diagnosed with autism. I refused. Now that they are 17 and 14, it is clear that neither of them are on the spectrum. They are just a bit unique.
Anonymous
by Anonymous 5 on Feb. 15, 2017 at 11:04 AM
As a professional in this area, I feel it is both. I see kids diagnosed by under qualified clinicians who clearly don't have autism. I also see kids who clearly are on the spectrum who certainly wouldn't have gotten the services they need 20 years ago. Diagnostic criteria have certainly changed, most recently with the DSM-V.
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