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The problem with mainstreaming

Anonymous
Posted by Anonymous
  • 65 Replies
I understand the point of mainstreaming special needs children. However I also see one of the biggest problems is that having them in the class room can be a huge distraction for the average kid. In my 3rd graders class there is a boy that has autistic. My son is friends with the boy and has been since K. However my son asked me to have his teacher move his desk away from the boy because he is distracting because he sits and plays with his toys all day. According to his IEP the boy is allowed to play with small toys at his desk. I understand that this helps him but it's distracting to other students and that's my problem.
Posted by Anonymous on Apr. 10, 2017 at 11:14 AM
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Replies (1-10):
AmaliaD
by Ruby Member on Apr. 10, 2017 at 11:17 AM
Oh wait until you're compassionate and kind child is assigned group work with the mainstream students which means that your child has to complete the work without peer help and supervise the behavior. 🙄 I can't wait until middle school when they get leveled classes.
Anonymous
by Anonymous 2 on Apr. 10, 2017 at 11:18 AM
1 mom liked this
In 3rd grade, your son should be able to deal with this himself. If he can't speak to the teacher about it, he should write her a note.
luckysevenwow
by Emerald Member on Apr. 10, 2017 at 11:18 AM
2 moms liked this
The world will always be full of distractions.

I get it though, as the parent of a SN's kid (who wasn't a distraction) and just a parent who's kids did have the distractions. We worked on solutions, instead of pointing fingers.
Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on Apr. 10, 2017 at 11:22 AM
maybe he should be able to deal with this on his own but since he is only in 3rd grade and it's having an impact on his education you better believe I'm going to be involved. It's part of being a parent.

Quoting Anonymous 2: In 3rd grade, your son should be able to deal with this himself. If he can't speak to the teacher about it, he should write her a note.
Anonymous
by Anonymous 3 on Apr. 10, 2017 at 11:22 AM

I live in Ontario, Canada and its very different here, they have classrooms designed for kids with Special Needs, if the child is only a bit behind with zero behavioral issues or its a rare thing, they are mainstreamed for the most part. Kids who are very behind and or lack social and have behavior issues are in Basic Life Skills programs. It also has it cons as does mainstreaming SN children.

As a parent with kids with SN and one who is mainstreamed and one who is not, plus a  typical child, I understand the ins and outs from all sides, its not so black and white and the process to get one out of mainstream or vice versa isn't easy, us parents stress about these issues all the time, sometimes the school board forces the mainstream while the parents are fighting for a SN classroom.

Why-meee
by Silver Member on Apr. 10, 2017 at 11:24 AM
My first grader has a huge kid next to him with problems. He hits my son and gets away with iT. I hate him
Anonymous
by Anonymous 2 on Apr. 10, 2017 at 11:24 AM
Another part of being a parent is teaching your kid to solve problems on his own. He's in 3rd grade. He can easily handle this one.

Quoting Anonymous 1: maybe he should be able to deal with this on his own but since he is only in 3rd grade and it's having an impact on his education you better believe I'm going to be involved. It's part of being a parent.

Quoting Anonymous 2: In 3rd grade, your son should be able to deal with this himself. If he can't speak to the teacher about it, he should write her a note.
Littlebunnyfufu
by Platinum Member on Apr. 10, 2017 at 11:26 AM
Yeah, I had that problem with typical kids all through school… I can't tell you how often teachers told me that I needed to figure out how to get my group to work with me after placing me with all the kids in class who made it clear they didn't care.

Idk maybe teachers shouldn't purposefully group children so that one is going to shoulder 100% of the project? But sure put in on the SN kids, they MUST be the issue.

Quoting AmaliaD: Oh wait until you're compassionate and kind child is assigned group work with the mainstream students which means that your child has to complete the work without peer help and supervise the behavior. 🙄 I can't wait until middle school when they get leveled classes.
Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on Apr. 10, 2017 at 11:29 AM
I see how it benefits the students on all sides, I really do. However my biggest concern is my child's education. I have a special needs child that will be mainstreamed. However if her behavior becomes a problem I'll pull her and place her into a different school with programs to help her. The school my son goes to doesn't have any special needs programs because it's a small private school.

Quoting Anonymous 3:

I live in Ontario, Canada and its very different here, they have classrooms designed for kids with Special Needs, if the child is only a bit behind with zero behavioral issues or its a rare thing, they are mainstreamed for the most part. Kids who are very behind and or lack social and have behavior issues are in Basic Life Skills programs. It also has it cons as does mainstreaming SN children.

As a parent with kids with SN and one who is mainstreamed and one who is not, plus a  typical child, I understand the ins and outs from all sides, its not so black and white and the process to get one out of mainstream or vice versa isn't easy, us parents stress about these issues all the time, sometimes the school board forces the mainstream while the parents are fighting for a SN classroom.

Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on Apr. 10, 2017 at 11:32 AM
It is part of it but when my child tells me of a problem and wants help with it I will help.

Quoting Anonymous 2: Another part of being a parent is teaching your kid to solve problems on his own. He's in 3rd grade. He can easily handle this one.

Quoting Anonymous 1: maybe he should be able to deal with this on his own but since he is only in 3rd grade and it's having an impact on his education you better believe I'm going to be involved. It's part of being a parent.

Quoting Anonymous 2: In 3rd grade, your son should be able to deal with this himself. If he can't speak to the teacher about it, he should write her a note.
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