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I probably have the ugliest bedroom on cafemom

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And I'm fine with it!

I don't think most of you would last 2 minutes in my house based off of how spoiled you all seem lol
Posted by Anonymous on May. 19, 2017 at 6:04 PM
Replies (241-245):
Anonymous
by Anonymous 20 on May. 21, 2017 at 3:47 AM


Quoting Boobear110:

Where you live you have the illusion of safety . No one is completely safe anywhere . That is just the reality of the world we live in

Quoting Anonymous 20:


Quoting Boobear110:

My parents own a condo in the Dominican Republic. Very poor country . One of the most beautiful places I have seen. There are armed guards at the front and at the beachside of the complex. I have never felt unsafe there. The people in town are lovely . Yes they are poor but you won't catch most people here in the US saying hello and smiling to the stranger walking down the street . Or waving to you as they dart by on their scooter. 

My mother spends one day every week while she is there in a place called Redemption Village. She teaches the kids English . She brings them Floride treatments that she gets her dentist to donate . She brings them happiness when they see her. She brings them clothes that she collects when she's home.  This year my SD made rubber band bracelets for every kid in that village . It was a good lesson for her. 

Dont knock what you don't know. Most of them are just people trying to get by like everyone else . 

Quoting Anonymous 20:

While I have no doubt your country is beautiful (and your kids are undeniably cute ) I have no  desire to live anywhere that requires barbed wire and window bars.  IME needing those kinds of things means there is extreme poverty nearby (as in Brazil and parts of the Carribean) Those tire shredders at the hotels are there for a reason! Cheaper than having TWO guardhouses!

I have been to the Carribean-and Brazil...you might not feel unsafe in places with armed guards-but the reality of it is-the guards are necessary.  Where I live..no armed guards, no bars on the windows-my child can walk wherever he wants...no big deal if your house is left unlocked....

I wouldn't want to raise my child in an area where armed guards were necesary.  You might be fine with that.

Hell where my Dad lives (also on the water) everyone also says hello and will wave as you go bye...and no one there ever locks their doors, cars or even boats.  He has been there since 1986 and never had a single issue ever.



If they get past the barking dogs at either of our houses, they would need to be bullet proof from head to toe...not many people are bullet proof....So I am not too concerned.

Haps1
by Member on May. 21, 2017 at 3:53 AM
1 mom liked this
I thought i did something really cute when drinking one nt. I hung up mine and dds baptism dresses along with ds baptism blanket on the wall above the dresser which has their sonogram pictures on it. My mom said it looked like a shrine
Anonymous
by Anonymous 13 on May. 22, 2017 at 1:55 PM
It's heartbreaking, isn't it? And then they usually have to kick them back out early in the morning.
I'll never forget one night when my Dad came to have dinner with me at Gabriel's gate (mmmm...best BBQ chicken fingers ever!). Anyway, I lived a block away from the restraint, so we just walked over. It was probably February, cold af, and we walked by the homeless guy that lived on the corner of my street. Obviously mentally ill, never even asked for money, just mumbled to himself.
After we passed him, my father said "that guy needs to get a job".
I couldn't believe it. My father is a chemical engineer, not particularly empathetic but usually able to connect the fucking dots. I said to my father "why don't you hire him at YOUR company? You gave the power to do that."
Of course after that, crickets. The homeless are always someone else's problem.

Quoting mary716: I remember reading about that, I was born in 84 though. My husband works for an organization that has a homeless shelter in place and there are times in the winter that it's filled to capacity and they sadly have to turn people away.

Quoting Anonymous 13: No, I didn't ever participate in that. I lived on Irvington in Allentown and our power went out enough that I got the idea;)
I'm sure you know this, but when the psych hospitals did massive discharges in the 1970's, and they have people bus tickets, Buffalo was the end of the line. So, the people too mentally ill to get off the bus earlier were forced out in Buffalo. Nice, eh?

Quoting mary716: Did you do the sleep in the park for homeless awareness here in buffalo? I did that once in high school and it was in October and I fully agree, here in buff there is no fucking way in Jan/Feb people would choose to literally freeze to death. It's why we have code blue shelters everywhere.

Quoting Anonymous 13: Honestly, I'm not sure what you're missing here. I lived on Buffalo, N.Y. and worked at a shelter called "Friends of the Night People". People with sound minds do not choose to be homeless in Buffalo, N.Y. in the winter.
Drug addiction and alcoholism and mental illness makes these choices FOR people.

The one exception I can think of is when I lived in Portland, Oregon and there were basically transient teenagers and early twenty somethings who lived between Portland and Seattle pretty much by choice. They were young and free and the climate was fairly temperate.
Enjoy your weekend!

Quoting Anonymous 28: So first you said he was choosing to live that way. Now you say he isn't. Look, there are people anxious to have a lower standard of living than they are able to have. Your original statement said you had never met anyone like that. You may not have met them, but they are out there.

Quoting Anonymous 13: As you said, that man was mentally ill ( PTSD or whatever). The homeless who cannot and will not find shelter are almost universally drug addicts, alcoholics and/or mentally ill.
These people aren't "choosing " anything. Their addictions and illnesses make their choices for them.

Quoting Anonymous 28: Yes, you said you never met a person anxious to have a lower standard of living than he was able to. I'm saying this is a man who could be given a place to live and would probably be very anxious to return to the swamp.

There are some areas which have a housing first initiative for dealing with the homeless. One hurdle they always have to get past is that there are some homeless people who do not want housing and cannot be convinced to stop sleeping on the street.

Just because there are many people who would choose to have as high of a standard of living as they are able to does not mean that everyone feels that way.

Quoting Anonymous 13: The point is, he lives like that by choice. Most homeless and people in the projects would trade up, if they could.

Quoting Anonymous 28: Really? I used to live near this swamp. We had a guy who was a Vietnam vet who lived in the swamp. He ate gator, fished, and foraged. He was very happy, and never wanted to live in a home. I figured he probably had some kind of PTSD that made it so he lived better out of society than in it. But he'd talk to you if you rowed out a canoe to him, but you'd have to trade him something. He said conversation was his currency, and he wouldn't tell you any of his stories unless you had something to give him. He's in his late 60s and has been living out there since he was pretty young, in his 20s.

Quoting Anonymous 13: Hmmm. Okay. I've yet to meet many people anxious to have a lower standard of living than they are able to.

Quoting Trouser.Mouse: Some people choose to live the way they do.

Quoting Anonymous 13: Does anyone want to live in poverty unless it's out of absolute necessity?

Quoting Trouser.Mouse: I've been homeless and have lived in poverty. I feel like I could survive many things, but wouldn't want to unless necessary.
mary716
by Bonbon Eater on May. 22, 2017 at 2:11 PM
It is sad!!! Last winter was absolutely brutal here. I can't even imagine those that were turned away. Several churches opened their doors and allowed them to sleep in the pews. People were driving around handing out blankets and hot cocoa. It really does bring you down a notch to see that everything you have now can be taken in a heartbeat.

Quoting Anonymous 13: It's heartbreaking, isn't it? And then they usually have to kick them back out early in the morning.
I'll never forget one night when my Dad came to have dinner with me at Gabriel's gate (mmmm...best BBQ chicken fingers ever!). Anyway, I lived a block away from the restraint, so we just walked over. It was probably February, cold af, and we walked by the homeless guy that lived on the corner of my street. Obviously mentally ill, never even asked for money, just mumbled to himself.
After we passed him, my father said "that guy needs to get a job".
I couldn't believe it. My father is a chemical engineer, not particularly empathetic but usually able to connect the fucking dots. I said to my father "why don't you hire him at YOUR company? You gave the power to do that."
Of course after that, crickets. The homeless are always someone else's problem.

Quoting mary716: I remember reading about that, I was born in 84 though. My husband works for an organization that has a homeless shelter in place and there are times in the winter that it's filled to capacity and they sadly have to turn people away.

Quoting Anonymous 13: No, I didn't ever participate in that. I lived on Irvington in Allentown and our power went out enough that I got the idea;)
I'm sure you know this, but when the psych hospitals did massive discharges in the 1970's, and they have people bus tickets, Buffalo was the end of the line. So, the people too mentally ill to get off the bus earlier were forced out in Buffalo. Nice, eh?

Quoting mary716: Did you do the sleep in the park for homeless awareness here in buffalo? I did that once in high school and it was in October and I fully agree, here in buff there is no fucking way in Jan/Feb people would choose to literally freeze to death. It's why we have code blue shelters everywhere.

Quoting Anonymous 13: Honestly, I'm not sure what you're missing here. I lived on Buffalo, N.Y. and worked at a shelter called "Friends of the Night People". People with sound minds do not choose to be homeless in Buffalo, N.Y. in the winter.
Drug addiction and alcoholism and mental illness makes these choices FOR people.

The one exception I can think of is when I lived in Portland, Oregon and there were basically transient teenagers and early twenty somethings who lived between Portland and Seattle pretty much by choice. They were young and free and the climate was fairly temperate.
Enjoy your weekend!

Quoting Anonymous 28: So first you said he was choosing to live that way. Now you say he isn't. Look, there are people anxious to have a lower standard of living than they are able to have. Your original statement said you had never met anyone like that. You may not have met them, but they are out there.

Quoting Anonymous 13: As you said, that man was mentally ill ( PTSD or whatever). The homeless who cannot and will not find shelter are almost universally drug addicts, alcoholics and/or mentally ill.
These people aren't "choosing " anything. Their addictions and illnesses make their choices for them.

Quoting Anonymous 28: Yes, you said you never met a person anxious to have a lower standard of living than he was able to. I'm saying this is a man who could be given a place to live and would probably be very anxious to return to the swamp.

There are some areas which have a housing first initiative for dealing with the homeless. One hurdle they always have to get past is that there are some homeless people who do not want housing and cannot be convinced to stop sleeping on the street.

Just because there are many people who would choose to have as high of a standard of living as they are able to does not mean that everyone feels that way.

Quoting Anonymous 13: The point is, he lives like that by choice. Most homeless and people in the projects would trade up, if they could.

Quoting Anonymous 28: Really? I used to live near this swamp. We had a guy who was a Vietnam vet who lived in the swamp. He ate gator, fished, and foraged. He was very happy, and never wanted to live in a home. I figured he probably had some kind of PTSD that made it so he lived better out of society than in it. But he'd talk to you if you rowed out a canoe to him, but you'd have to trade him something. He said conversation was his currency, and he wouldn't tell you any of his stories unless you had something to give him. He's in his late 60s and has been living out there since he was pretty young, in his 20s.

Quoting Anonymous 13: Hmmm. Okay. I've yet to meet many people anxious to have a lower standard of living than they are able to.

Quoting Trouser.Mouse: Some people choose to live the way they do.

Quoting Anonymous 13: Does anyone want to live in poverty unless it's out of absolute necessity?

Quoting Trouser.Mouse: I've been homeless and have lived in poverty. I feel like I could survive many things, but wouldn't want to unless necessary.
Anonymous
by Anonymous 13 on May. 22, 2017 at 2:19 PM
Absolutely, girl. I've lived all over the United States, but hands down, I learned the most about life (good and bad) in Buffalo. I think it is a wonderful place to be raised, to be honest. Sailing, skiing, wonderful suburbs, creepy "fruit street" areas, etc.
it's also very diverse, financially as well as ethnically. I still believe that there is tremendous compassion and a sense of community in Buffalo.
And we're no shrinking violets, lol!

Quoting mary716: It is sad!!! Last winter was absolutely brutal here. I can't even imagine those that were turned away. Several churches opened their doors and allowed them to sleep in the pews. People were driving around handing out blankets and hot cocoa. It really does bring you down a notch to see that everything you have now can be taken in a heartbeat.

Quoting Anonymous 13: It's heartbreaking, isn't it? And then they usually have to kick them back out early in the morning.
I'll never forget one night when my Dad came to have dinner with me at Gabriel's gate (mmmm...best BBQ chicken fingers ever!). Anyway, I lived a block away from the restraint, so we just walked over. It was probably February, cold af, and we walked by the homeless guy that lived on the corner of my street. Obviously mentally ill, never even asked for money, just mumbled to himself.
After we passed him, my father said "that guy needs to get a job".
I couldn't believe it. My father is a chemical engineer, not particularly empathetic but usually able to connect the fucking dots. I said to my father "why don't you hire him at YOUR company? You gave the power to do that."
Of course after that, crickets. The homeless are always someone else's problem.

Quoting mary716: I remember reading about that, I was born in 84 though. My husband works for an organization that has a homeless shelter in place and there are times in the winter that it's filled to capacity and they sadly have to turn people away.

Quoting Anonymous 13: No, I didn't ever participate in that. I lived on Irvington in Allentown and our power went out enough that I got the idea;)
I'm sure you know this, but when the psych hospitals did massive discharges in the 1970's, and they have people bus tickets, Buffalo was the end of the line. So, the people too mentally ill to get off the bus earlier were forced out in Buffalo. Nice, eh?

Quoting mary716: Did you do the sleep in the park for homeless awareness here in buffalo? I did that once in high school and it was in October and I fully agree, here in buff there is no fucking way in Jan/Feb people would choose to literally freeze to death. It's why we have code blue shelters everywhere.

Quoting Anonymous 13: Honestly, I'm not sure what you're missing here. I lived on Buffalo, N.Y. and worked at a shelter called "Friends of the Night People". People with sound minds do not choose to be homeless in Buffalo, N.Y. in the winter.
Drug addiction and alcoholism and mental illness makes these choices FOR people.

The one exception I can think of is when I lived in Portland, Oregon and there were basically transient teenagers and early twenty somethings who lived between Portland and Seattle pretty much by choice. They were young and free and the climate was fairly temperate.
Enjoy your weekend!

Quoting Anonymous 28: So first you said he was choosing to live that way. Now you say he isn't. Look, there are people anxious to have a lower standard of living than they are able to have. Your original statement said you had never met anyone like that. You may not have met them, but they are out there.

Quoting Anonymous 13: As you said, that man was mentally ill ( PTSD or whatever). The homeless who cannot and will not find shelter are almost universally drug addicts, alcoholics and/or mentally ill.
These people aren't "choosing " anything. Their addictions and illnesses make their choices for them.

Quoting Anonymous 28: Yes, you said you never met a person anxious to have a lower standard of living than he was able to. I'm saying this is a man who could be given a place to live and would probably be very anxious to return to the swamp.

There are some areas which have a housing first initiative for dealing with the homeless. One hurdle they always have to get past is that there are some homeless people who do not want housing and cannot be convinced to stop sleeping on the street.

Just because there are many people who would choose to have as high of a standard of living as they are able to does not mean that everyone feels that way.

Quoting Anonymous 13: The point is, he lives like that by choice. Most homeless and people in the projects would trade up, if they could.

Quoting Anonymous 28: Really? I used to live near this swamp. We had a guy who was a Vietnam vet who lived in the swamp. He ate gator, fished, and foraged. He was very happy, and never wanted to live in a home. I figured he probably had some kind of PTSD that made it so he lived better out of society than in it. But he'd talk to you if you rowed out a canoe to him, but you'd have to trade him something. He said conversation was his currency, and he wouldn't tell you any of his stories unless you had something to give him. He's in his late 60s and has been living out there since he was pretty young, in his 20s.

Quoting Anonymous 13: Hmmm. Okay. I've yet to meet many people anxious to have a lower standard of living than they are able to.

Quoting Trouser.Mouse: Some people choose to live the way they do.

Quoting Anonymous 13: Does anyone want to live in poverty unless it's out of absolute necessity?

Quoting Trouser.Mouse: I've been homeless and have lived in poverty. I feel like I could survive many things, but wouldn't want to unless necessary.
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