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Why I No Longer Tolerate Anti-Vaxxers

Posted by Anonymous   + Show Post

September 29th, 2016

Why I No Longer Tolerate Anti-Vaxxers

Emily F. Moore, RN, MSN, CPNP-PC, CCRN




Emily F. Moore, RN, MSN, CPNP-PC, CCRN practices pediatric cardiovascular care across the Pacific Northwest.


One may ask why I am all of a sudden fixated on vaccines. I have always been a pro-vaxxer. In graduate school, I once prided myself for talking a whole family into getting vaccines. And I certainly have always promoted vaccines when practicing.

But I used to think that the decision to vaccinate, although important, was not mine to make. Parents have their own reasoning, and my job as the clinician was to provide proper education but then support the decision made. Of course, vaccinating my own children was a no-brainer. (Why wouldn’t I choose to protect them from terrible diseases?)

Then my two-year-old was diagnosed with pertussis. The days following were a blur. I was 38 weeks pregnant and desperately trying to get my daughter the help she needed while also praying that my unborn baby didn’t make an early debut. I had always thought that my own children would be protected because they were vaccinated, and if for whatever reason something happened, the high percentage of vaccinated children would provide extra security.
sick_kid-154048047
Here is what happened. My daughter was coughed on while playing at the park. I shrugged it off; kids get sick, and we can’t protect them from everything. About a week later, she developed a terrible cough followed by a high fever. As the days progressed, she developed posttussive emesis and a cough that would stop anyone in their tracks. In the back of my mind, I thought, oh my gosh, she has whooping cough. How crazy would that be though? She’s fully vaccinated. So I chalked it up to a cold and ignored it.

Because I was busy getting my hours in before maternity leave, I had my husband take her to our pediatrician. Our pediatrician called me at work and more or less reassured me that pertussis was not within the differential. She said that our daughter had a bad cough and needed time to recover. I reminded her that I was 12 days away from having a baby and wanted to make sure all was well. So, we made a plan; if the cough wasn’t better in the next 5 days, we would test her.

Well, we didn’t make it 5 days. One day later in the middle of the night, the most heart-stopping cough woke me up. I ran to my daughter’s room and found her gasping (whooping) for air with intermittent bouts of apnea. I yelled to my husband to call 911. By the time he deciphered what I was yelling, my daughter had recovered. She slept with us that night and had two more episodes. The next day we went to urgent care. There, I was belittled and told that there was no way my vaccinated child had pertussis. I mean, after all, she looked perfect in the exam room (doesn’t this always happen?). I must not recognize what croup looks like in a “non-cardiac” baby (cardiology being my practice specialty). To say that this infuriated me is an understatement. Regardless, I was determined to get a diagnosis.

What finally convinced the urgent care providers to send a culture was my advanced pregnancy. However, this, too, was followed with patronizing comments. They wouldn’t even discuss treatment options, stating that they were 99.9% certain that she had croup. I left the appointment thinking I must be crazy.

Later that day I got the phone call — my daughter had pertussis.

A positive culture turned our worlds upside down. We were reported to public health, I couldn’t return to work, my daughter couldn’t leave the house, and everyone in our family needed to be treated. On top of that, the cough continued for weeks. They say pertussis is the 100-day cough, and I can see why.

My daughter catching pertussis, a preventable disease, has been one of the scariest experiences I have had as a parent. Watching her suffer from an absolutely paralyzing cough with apnea was indescribably horrible. This experience taught me two things: First, always listen to parents. They truly know their children best. Second, the decision to vaccinate should not be taken lightly. I will no longer sit quietly when caring for unvaccinated children. I will voice my bias. I once thought I didn’t support anti-vaxxers. Now I can state from experience: I do not tolerate them. If given the choice, I will not treat patients whose parents choose not to vaccinate them.

pertussis_infant

Source

http://blogs.jwatch.org/frontlines-clinical-medicine/2016/09/29/no-longer-tolerate-anti-vaxxers/




 

Posted by Anonymous on Jun. 18, 2017 at 9:32 PM
Replies (221-228):
Anonymous
by Anonymous 4 on Jun. 20, 2017 at 3:41 PM
So keeping unvaccinated children out of public school will protect all the other children? Is that what you're saying? Because of course kids can only get sick at school.
Quoting susannah2000:

Quoting Anonymous 4: I'm still not vaccinating my kids. I don't trust the government, Tuskegee experiment. If vaccinations were so safe the government would have not paid out over 3 billion dollars to families that can prove their children were adversely affected by vaccinations.

yYeah, just disregard all the billions of children who no longer get polio, diptheria, tetanus, hepatitis. or die from measles and other childhood diseases, etc etc and haven't for decades. Of course there are children who may be adversely affected. The best medicine in the world won't be perfect for everyone. But there are far more people who have lad healthier lives, or lives, period, because of vaccines. Children whose parents won't vaccinate them should not be allowed to go to school.

hart57
by Ruby Member on Jun. 20, 2017 at 4:12 PM
Apparently you are confused and perhaps a little stupid (I can be rude back), I never made an assumption, I said that MAYBE where the cough came from.

I also find it ironic the whooping cough has been confirmed after I pointed out you said nothing about it. I do wish your baby a speedy recovery if their is any truth to this.

Quoting Anonymous 7:
Quoting hart57: Of course they are two different coughs. That was not stated in your comment at all. Horrible cough doesn't equal whooping cough.

I was simply stating your child could of picked up something at the doctor office or it could be that big bad life saving vaccine. You pick.

Quoting Anonymous 7:
Quoting hart57: My son gets sick EVERYTIME we enter that doctor office, a cold (includes cough) or the flu (includes a cough sometimes). Your Pediatricians office is a big germ factory. So that could be a factor. I hate well check up because he always gets sick afterwards.

Quoting Anonymous 7:
Quoting Anonymous 5: My bil got whopping cough a month after being vaccinated. It was horrible getting it diagnosed because they insisted that couldn't be it since he was vaccinated.
Funny dh and I are not up to date and didn't get it despite him living with us.
Also how does she know it was given to her daughter by someone who doesn't vaccinate and not another child who had been vaccinated and got it anyways like hers did?
Her daughter would have received treatment sooner if she wasn't vaccinated.


My dd was vaccinated against it last week. She's had a horrible cough since. Of course I'm crazy for thinking they are related. 🙄


A regular cough and a cough from whooping cough are totally different.


My dd has whooping cough. It's been confirmed. The rest of your stupid assumptions I'm choosing to ignore.
Anonymous
by Anonymous 51 on Jun. 20, 2017 at 4:15 PM
I'm not anti-vax but I understand where "pro safe vaxxers" are coming from. This is the second such post I've seen on this site where the doctors have dismissed a blatant diagnosis because the patient can't possibly have it, they're vaccinated. Which puts off correct treatment for the illness potentially risking the person's life. Vaccines are failing more and more. These doctors need to get their stuff together and learn how to treat these diseases. We have the knowledge and medications to treat these diseases when they arise unlike before vaccines but doctors need to recognize the symptoms and not put off care because they've never experienced it and since we have a vaccine that can't be the issue.
Anonymous
by Anonymous 16 on Jun. 20, 2017 at 4:20 PM

then keep your damn spawn OUT OF PUBLIC!!!!  

Disease can spread ANYWHERE

Quoting Anonymous 53: I don't know where everyone else's kids go to school but I know it's the law where I live. If you don't have up to date shot records, your kids don't attend public school here in Upstate NY. I wouldn't want my kids exposed to potentially deadly contagious diseases anyway.


susannah2000
by Ruby Member on Jun. 20, 2017 at 4:26 PM


Quoting Anonymous 4: So keeping unvaccinated children out of public school will protect all the other children? Is that what you're saying? Because of course kids can only get sick at school.
Quoting susannah2000:


Quoting Anonymous 4: I'm still not vaccinating my kids. I don't trust the government, Tuskegee experiment. If vaccinations were so safe the government would have not paid out over 3 billion dollars to families that can prove their children were adversely affected by vaccinations.

yYeah, just disregard all the billions of children who no longer get polio, diptheria, tetanus, hepatitis. or die from measles and other childhood diseases, etc etc and haven't for decades. Of course there are children who may be adversely affected. The best medicine in the world won't be perfect for everyone. But there are far more people who have lad healthier lives, or lives, period, because of vaccines. Children whose parents won't vaccinate them should not be allowed to go to school.

Right, because all children are in close and often enclosed environments with hundreds of other kids for hours every day in other situations.

momto2boys973
by Emerald Member on Jun. 20, 2017 at 6:07 PM

Gee... the snarky attitude just disappeared from you, huh? Ignoring my reply? Let me copy/paste it for you:

"Says a person who doesn't even know that in order to grow viruses in a Petri dish you first need to grow cells in it to act as hosts, lol. Guess you missed that one in your "actual science" readings. 

And I didn't say that unvaccinated people are "special hosts". But since they're not vaccinated, they're more likely to get infected with the disease. Regardless of how much you want to say that vaccinated people are to blame for epidemics, that's not true. Fact is, the unvaccinated are the high risk group."

Any answer to that, or did you just conveniently ignored it?

Quoting booklover74: Actually, no. That's not how it works. Yes viruses need hosts to spread. However viruses can and do mutate in a petri dish. Unvaccinated people are not some special or unique host that are what allow a virus to mutate, as you imply. Vurusus mutate in Vaccinated people as well. Vaccinated people actually contract pertussis at a higher rate than unvaccinated. Entire schools, with 90% or more vaccination rates, have had near 100% outbreaks with patient zero being an up to date vaccinated person, even in mutated versions. Unvaccinated people are generally not patient zero in outbreaks. For your thought to be anywhere close to factual, patient zero, in every outbreak or strain would need to be unvaccinated. Either that or unvaccinated people have amazing immune systems that allow for them to be carrier's, without actually getting sick, of all sorts of illnesses, mutating or not. You're going to need to go back to the drawing board on your thoughts because they are bunk. Try reading some actual science as well, maybe peruse the CDC, cause they disagree with you as well.
Quoting momto2boys973:

Because viruses need hosts to mutate. They don't just mutate on the kitchen counter, viruses need a host to reproduce. Unvaccinated people are those hosts, that's where the mutations that can cause a virus to increase its virulent abilities happen. So if more people are unprotected and the virus has more hosts to infect, the chances of mutations increase.

Quoting Anonymous 27: You missed my point. You blame people that don't vaccinate for the mutation of viruses. How is it not feasible that germs are doing what they need to, naturally, to survive?
Quoting B1Bomber:

Exactly. And our immune systems can handle some of them, but not all of them. We treat infections with antibiotics and viruses with preventative care. I've always been in favor of vaccinations, but when my friend's whole family got whooping cough, I got a lot more opinionated. They were seriously sick for months.

Quoting Anonymous 27: Germs mutate to survive, just like the flu virus does.
Quoting B1Bomber:

The biggest problem with the decreasing vaccination rates is that diseases that were once essentially eradicated are coming back and, as they pass from person to person, are mutating slightly. They are still the same diseases, but they are molecularly different enough that the vaccines most of us DID have are losing efficacy. We are starting to face versions of diseases for which we have no vaccines yet. Think of the flu vaccine, how they have to guess which strains will be most virulent and even when they guess right, only cover about 2/3 of people who bother with the shot. Imagine if measles, pertussis, or polio became like that.




conweis
by Ruby Member on Jun. 20, 2017 at 6:16 PM
Her vax child got a disease she was vaxxed from.
Anonymous
by Anonymous 54 on Jun. 20, 2017 at 6:30 PM
Guess her daughter got a bad vaccine huh....otherwise it would have protected her. Idiots
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