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Autism diagnosis at almost 11

Anonymous
Posted by Anonymous
  • 43 Replies
My daughter will be 11 next month and was diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder , or what the psychiatrist said would have previously been called aspergers. I'm having a hard time with it, not necessarily the diagnosis after researching it actually makes a lot of sense, but the way I perceive her behaviors and react to them.
She has started taking an anti anxiety medication to help with that aspect of things. My main concern is once school starts again making sure her teacher is aware that sometimes she's not ignoring your directions she's just having a hard time with something going on around her. I also don't want her to use it as an excuse to just not do something she doesn't want to do.
So I guess my question is, how do you determine if something is because of autism or if your kid is just being difficult. Here's an example: before the diagnosis and any talk of a diagnosis she got in trouble at school and wasn't allowed to go to garden club anymore. Garden club was every Monday at 10, one Monday they were doing the physical fitness test in the morning. When it was time for garden club my daughter left the mile run she was supposed to be doing and went to the garden like she does every Monday. Obviously she shouldn't have left, her teacher didn't know where she went and she didn't finish the running portion of the test, but no one told her she was not going to garden that day because it's not really something you think you have to tell a 5th grader. When I talked with her about it she said "well it was time to go to garden so I went like I always do, PE is supposed to be on Wednesday not Monday" to her it was perfectly logical. But how do I tell if she was just trying to get out of running or actually just doing what she thought she should be doing. For the record she is the only one in her class that goes to garden club so it's not like others were supposed to go and didn't, not that she would notice either way she's mostly in her own little world most of the time.
Posted by Anonymous on Jun. 19, 2017 at 3:07 PM
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Replies (1-10):
Anonymous
by Anonymous 2 on Jun. 19, 2017 at 3:09 PM

Her explanation of leaving for the garden club sounds just like my neighbor who has Aspergers.    He is very logical...to a fault.  

raseco
by Member on Jun. 19, 2017 at 3:10 PM

that is a typical autistic thing.  my dd has a set schedule and she hates to deviate from it.  if she has a thing she does at a certain time, especially something she LIKES to do, she will do it at that time. now a chore, those she ignores no matter what time it is even though they are to be done at the same time every day.  but we have to spell everything out for her every single day and usually have to remind her if something is going to be different that day because she will forget if we don't tell her. and we've had her diagnosis since age 5.

Anonymous
by Anonymous 3 on Jun. 19, 2017 at 3:12 PM

Routine is very important for most people on the spectrum. Any change in routine is difficult for them. I think that you should take some time to talk with her doctor & read things so you can learn more about her condition, what aspects of her behavior are likely due to her condition, and then you'll need to set up a meeting with the school to implement a formal plan. An IEP  (Individualized Education Program) is a written document that's developed for each public school child who is eligible for special education. The IEP is created through a team effort and reviewed at least once a year.

Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on Jun. 19, 2017 at 3:23 PM
She does have an IEP in place but it's main focus is academic. All the accommodations in place are the same as my older daughter that has dyslexia, more time on tests, testing in a different room, more time
For work to be completed. Now that we have the autism diagnosis I feel like there will need to be things added.

Because at the time of the IEP meeting there wasn't a medical diagnosis the IEP was put into place for "non specific learning disabilities" to get her help with reading and writing.

Quoting Anonymous 3:

Routine is very important for most people on the spectrum. Any change in routine is difficult for them. I think that you should take some time to talk with her doctor & read things so you can learn more about her condition, what aspects of her behavior are likely due to her condition, and then you'll need to set up a meeting with the school to implement a formal plan. An IEP  (Individualized Education Program) is a written document that's developed for each public school child who is eligible for special education. The IEP is created through a team effort and reviewed at least once a year.

Robin-Christine
by Platinum Member on Jun. 19, 2017 at 3:26 PM
This does not mean she will be pulled from a regular classroom.This allows for more verbal prompts,extra time for work if she needs it...

Quoting Anonymous 3:

Routine is very important for most people on the spectrum. Any change in routine is difficult for them. I think that you should take some time to talk with her doctor & read things so you can learn more about her condition, what aspects of her behavior are likely due to her condition, and then you'll need to set up a meeting with the school to implement a formal plan. An IEP  (Individualized Education Program) is a written document that's developed for each public school child who is eligible for special education. The IEP is created through a team effort and reviewed at least once a year.

Anonymous
by Anonymous 4 on Jun. 19, 2017 at 3:27 PM

As a teacher, I will tell you that, one, her teacher will be familiar with working with children with autism, and will have knowledge and training to help her be successful.  

And two, ultimately deciding if a particular behavior or incident is "due to the autism or not", is basically a pointless pursuit.  You can't separate the Autism" from the "not Autism", because it all flows together to form one child.  And ultimately, it doesn't change the goal, which is to help her be as successful as she can be.  Worrying about the "why" is a futile waste of energy . . . enery that you desperately need to put into the moving forward . . . the "what are we going to do about it?" part of this.  Because, autism or not, you still have to address asocial behaviors, or issues that inhibit her success.  And, autism or not, there is no one-size-fits all answer to that, because every child is unique.   And autism or not, you just have to implement strategies until you find what works for her, and move her as far forward as she can go with a given goal.  Just like you would do for any child, in any situation . . . autism or not. 🙂


Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on Jun. 19, 2017 at 3:30 PM
She already has an IEP but it was based off the schools testing and their results showing her IQ is much higher than her achievement in school. They did say their tests show she had "autistic like behaviors" but they are not qualified to diagnose her so the IEP is based on her learning problems and not autism. She will be pulled out of class for an hour a day to work on reading and writing in a small group.

Quoting Robin-Christine: This does not mean she will be pulled from a regular classroom.This allows for more verbal prompts,extra time for work if she needs it...

Quoting Anonymous 3:

Routine is very important for most people on the spectrum. Any change in routine is difficult for them. I think that you should take some time to talk with her doctor & read things so you can learn more about her condition, what aspects of her behavior are likely due to her condition, and then you'll need to set up a meeting with the school to implement a formal plan. An IEP  (Individualized Education Program) is a written document that's developed for each public school child who is eligible for special education. The IEP is created through a team effort and reviewed at least once a year.

Anonymous
by Anonymous 3 on Jun. 19, 2017 at 3:33 PM

That's why an IEP is reviewed annually. Now that she does have a medical diagnosis, the IEP can be revised in whatever way it needs to be in light of her recent diagnosis.

Quoting Anonymous 1: She does have an IEP in place but it's main focus is academic. All the accommodations in place are the same as my older daughter that has dyslexia, more time on tests, testing in a different room, more time For work to be completed. Now that we have the autism diagnosis I feel like there will need to be things added. Because at the time of the IEP meeting there wasn't a medical diagnosis the IEP was put into place for "non specific learning disabilities" to get her help with reading and writing.
Quoting Anonymous 3:

Routine is very important for most people on the spectrum. Any change in routine is difficult for them. I think that you should take some time to talk with her doctor & read things so you can learn more about her condition, what aspects of her behavior are likely due to her condition, and then you'll need to set up a meeting with the school to implement a formal plan. An IEP  (Individualized Education Program) is a written document that's developed for each public school child who is eligible for special education. The IEP is created through a team effort and reviewed at least once a year.


Famousglm714
by Gina on Jun. 19, 2017 at 3:33 PM

I'm still figuring that out myself. At least when new issues come up with DS (6). I don't know her so it's hard to say. I would definitely speak to the school about an IEP and get everyone on the same page. My DS's team is wonderful and have helped me so much. 

Anonymous
by Anonymous 4 on Jun. 19, 2017 at 3:36 PM

Even with an ASD diagnosis, you're still talking about a mental health/educational diagnosis more than a medical diagnosis, in the traditional sense of the word.  (In other words, it is far more similar to NSLD than to, say, kidney or liver disease).  While some things may be added to or changed on her IEP, likely much of it will remain the same.  Because regardless of the diagnosis or reason behind it, ultimately, she still struggles in the same areas that she did a month ago, and will still need goals to address those areas.  Academically, she didn't become a different kid, just because she got a different diagnosis.  

Quoting Anonymous 1: She does have an IEP in place but it's main focus is academic. All the accommodations in place are the same as my older daughter that has dyslexia, more time on tests, testing in a different room, more time For work to be completed. Now that we have the autism diagnosis I feel like there will need to be things added. Because at the time of the IEP meeting there wasn't a medical diagnosis the IEP was put into place for "non specific learning disabilities" to get her help with reading and writing.
Quoting Anonymous 3:

Routine is very important for most people on the spectrum. Any change in routine is difficult for them. I think that you should take some time to talk with her doctor & read things so you can learn more about her condition, what aspects of her behavior are likely due to her condition, and then you'll need to set up a meeting with the school to implement a formal plan. An IEP  (Individualized Education Program) is a written document that's developed for each public school child who is eligible for special education. The IEP is created through a team effort and reviewed at least once a year.


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