Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

Child in my class has an epic food allergy list.

Posted by Anonymous   + Show Post

This boy I have in my class this year is allergic to soy, shellfish, eggs, dairy, gluten, citrus, potato, tree nuts, peanuts, strawberry, and apparently artificial food dye.  

I'm left wondering what the heck this kid can eat.  I sent a list of treats I give out to the parents and they crossed all of it off.

Posted by Anonymous on Aug. 11, 2017 at 10:49 PM
Replies (291-299):
Anonymous
by Anonymous 79 on Aug. 25, 2017 at 10:20 PM
I chose to raise my child to lead a normal life. He does. I'd say my approach worked.

Quoting Anonymous 78: It's all about what's most important to you. Personally, I chose my kids, you, apparently, chose something else.

Quoting Anonymous 79: No, it's not an option for every family.
Did you even read what I wrote? I ensured there was a team in place to protect him, and I took sole responsibility for providing food for him. He is 10 now. He is safe, well adjusted, and independent. He knew at 3 what foods made him sick and he LOVED preschool. I wasn't going to shelter my child from the world over something that could be managed. That NEVER occurred to me. It occurred to me to teach him to live in a world that was not going to cater to him.

Quoting Anonymous 78: It is an option for every family, some just choose the easy way out and have others take responsibility for their kids while they work. A 3 year old should have their mother protecting them, they shouldn't be responsible for protecting themselves.

Quoting Anonymous 79: Homeschooling isn't an option for every family. My son had more than that and I sent him to preschool at 3. You teach them to manage their allergy. Yes, even at 3. At 3, that means, eat only what your teacher doesn't say is ok (I provided daily snacks and she only ever have him what I sent) and never ever share snacks with other kids.
Thankfully my son outgrew it all but, we didn't know if he would and it was better to start teaching him to manage it young than to shelter him. He can't grow up in a bubble nor would I want him to. Trust me, parents with kids like this are on top of their child's diet, and they go out of their way to work with the school and the teachers. I NEVER pushed our burden into anybody else. I took full responsibility for his difficulties and, as a team, we were able to keep him safe.

Quoting Anonymous 78: What kind of parent sends their kid to a public school with that many allergies?! I'd be homeschooling my kid.
Anonymous
by Anonymous 78 on Aug. 25, 2017 at 10:27 PM
Luckily, it did work out and I'm glad it did for you.

Quoting Anonymous 79: I chose to raise my child to lead a normal life. He does. I'd say my approach worked.

Quoting Anonymous 78: It's all about what's most important to you. Personally, I chose my kids, you, apparently, chose something else.

Quoting Anonymous 79: No, it's not an option for every family.
Did you even read what I wrote? I ensured there was a team in place to protect him, and I took sole responsibility for providing food for him. He is 10 now. He is safe, well adjusted, and independent. He knew at 3 what foods made him sick and he LOVED preschool. I wasn't going to shelter my child from the world over something that could be managed. That NEVER occurred to me. It occurred to me to teach him to live in a world that was not going to cater to him.

Quoting Anonymous 78: It is an option for every family, some just choose the easy way out and have others take responsibility for their kids while they work. A 3 year old should have their mother protecting them, they shouldn't be responsible for protecting themselves.

Quoting Anonymous 79: Homeschooling isn't an option for every family. My son had more than that and I sent him to preschool at 3. You teach them to manage their allergy. Yes, even at 3. At 3, that means, eat only what your teacher doesn't say is ok (I provided daily snacks and she only ever have him what I sent) and never ever share snacks with other kids.
Thankfully my son outgrew it all but, we didn't know if he would and it was better to start teaching him to manage it young than to shelter him. He can't grow up in a bubble nor would I want him to. Trust me, parents with kids like this are on top of their child's diet, and they go out of their way to work with the school and the teachers. I NEVER pushed our burden into anybody else. I took full responsibility for his difficulties and, as a team, we were able to keep him safe.

Quoting Anonymous 78: What kind of parent sends their kid to a public school with that many allergies?! I'd be homeschooling my kid.
Anonymous
by Anonymous 79 on Aug. 25, 2017 at 10:32 PM
Not luckily. We worked very hard to make sure he was safe and included. It worked out because we intended it to work out. (Yes, accidents can happen, and we were prepared for those too.)

Quoting Anonymous 78: Luckily, it did work out and I'm glad it did for you.

Quoting Anonymous 79: I chose to raise my child to lead a normal life. He does. I'd say my approach worked.

Quoting Anonymous 78: It's all about what's most important to you. Personally, I chose my kids, you, apparently, chose something else.

Quoting Anonymous 79: No, it's not an option for every family.
Did you even read what I wrote? I ensured there was a team in place to protect him, and I took sole responsibility for providing food for him. He is 10 now. He is safe, well adjusted, and independent. He knew at 3 what foods made him sick and he LOVED preschool. I wasn't going to shelter my child from the world over something that could be managed. That NEVER occurred to me. It occurred to me to teach him to live in a world that was not going to cater to him.

Quoting Anonymous 78: It is an option for every family, some just choose the easy way out and have others take responsibility for their kids while they work. A 3 year old should have their mother protecting them, they shouldn't be responsible for protecting themselves.

Quoting Anonymous 79: Homeschooling isn't an option for every family. My son had more than that and I sent him to preschool at 3. You teach them to manage their allergy. Yes, even at 3. At 3, that means, eat only what your teacher doesn't say is ok (I provided daily snacks and she only ever have him what I sent) and never ever share snacks with other kids.
Thankfully my son outgrew it all but, we didn't know if he would and it was better to start teaching him to manage it young than to shelter him. He can't grow up in a bubble nor would I want him to. Trust me, parents with kids like this are on top of their child's diet, and they go out of their way to work with the school and the teachers. I NEVER pushed our burden into anybody else. I took full responsibility for his difficulties and, as a team, we were able to keep him safe.

Quoting Anonymous 78: What kind of parent sends their kid to a public school with that many allergies?! I'd be homeschooling my kid.
Anonymous
by Anonymous 61 on Aug. 25, 2017 at 11:51 PM
Not everyone is capable of homeschooling and not everybody has the means for that. We pay taxes so we have in this country the right to a free education without discrimination and from your answers, you shouldn't be homeschooling since you are incapable to show your kids what empathy is.



Quoting Anonymous 78: I homeschool my kids but I can't imagine expecting an entire public school to accommodate my child because I couldn't be bothered to keep him/her safe on my own and expected an entire school to accommodate him/her. If your child has that many allergies then keep them at home.


Quoting Anonymous 61: You can whine all you want. It's a dissability covered under the ADA, it's a federal protection.

You have issues with your snowflake not being able to eat what he likes in the classroom? You can homeschool.

Stop being an ignorant bitch.

Quoting Anonymous 52: So a class full of other children should be inconvenienced by one kid? Handicap ramps and elevators don't negatively affect everyone in the class. Wheelchairs don't but this could.


I have a huge problem with food accommodations actually.

Quoting Anonymous 61: I love your ignorance.

If the parents request a 594 under the ADA accommodations must be done or they will be in violation of federal law.

You can make a food free classroom and wipe hands before entering.

It's not that hard.

Quoting Anonymous 52: I would absolutely not make accommodations for him without a note AND besides letting him sit alone I wouldn't limit foods other children eat or bring in.

It's not the classes fault what the fuck are the other kids supposed to do not eat?
thebadkitty
by on Aug. 25, 2017 at 11:54 PM

You think he has it bad I just realized along with my list I am now allergic to peppers all of it. I am allergic to preservatives which is in everything (food, cosmetic, beauty, hair spray, lotions, soaps, laundry soap, you name it. Plus I am allergic to cinnamon, and a bunch of other shit.

Anonymous
by Anonymous 52 on Aug. 27, 2017 at 1:13 AM
Wait so your daughter with an allergy was going to be forced to eat alone but NOT the BUT allergy kid? So bizarre! If a kid has an allergic reaction to anything they should know better not to go near the thing they are allergic to! Ffs!

Quoting Anonymous 77: I fully agree with you here. Our school district requires any lunch brought in by a child to be a balanced meal. It has to contain a fruit, vegetable, dairy, protein, and grain. It can also contain a dessert such as jello or pudding. No cookies, candy, soda, pie, cake, etc. the school will actually confiscate items that are against policy. If the lunch isn't balanced, they will serve the child a hot lunch and bill the parents. Needless to say, most parents just opt for hot lunch because the rules are insane.

Well, I had no choice but to pack my daughters lunch. She has an allergy to animal protein. If she eats a little, she gets cold symptoms but with very thick, copious amounts of mucous. If she eats more than a couple bites, it becomes vomiting, diarrhea, headaches, and a miserable rash. I would usually pack a peanut butter and jelly sandwich on whole grain bread and some fruits, veggies and string cheese. Other days, she would get granola clusters with raisins and soy milk to poor over it, a baggy of cashews and peanuts, carrot sticks with dressing and bottled water. Nuts are her main protein source.

In third grade, I received a letter from the school stating lunch time would be nut free to accommodate a child with allergies. They wanted to ensure he could safely eat with his peers. I went to the school and told them I respect their effort but my daughter doesn't have a choice. The school will either have to bend the lunch rule so she doesn't have to bring a protein for lunch or she'll continue bringing nuts. School principal said they can't bend the rules so my daughter will have to eat alone in a classroom. WTF?! my daughter was going to be punished for her allergy in order to accommodate another child's allergy. I said no, my daughter won't be secluded. The lunch room is huge. She can be sat on the opposite end. She knows she can't have meat and therefore doesn't eat it. If this kid has a nut allergy and is willing to cross the lunchroom and ask my daughter for her food, that child needs to be watched during lunch. Not my daughter. I even asked if my daughter eats in a classroom, are her friends free to join her? He said no.

School wouldn't budge on their lunch requirements and my daughter was not going to be kept prisoner in a classroom and away from her friends so now we homeschool. Accommodations are becoming ridiculous. Accommodating one child to the point that every other child pays for it. Life doesn't work that way.

Quoting Anonymous 52: So a class full of other children should be inconvenienced by one kid? Handicap ramps and elevators don't negatively affect everyone in the class. Wheelchairs don't but this could.


I have a huge problem with food accommodations actually.

Quoting Anonymous 61: I love your ignorance.

If the parents request a 594 under the ADA accommodations must be done or they will be in violation of federal law.

You can make a food free classroom and wipe hands before entering.

It's not that hard.

Quoting Anonymous 52: I would absolutely not make accommodations for him without a note AND besides letting him sit alone I wouldn't limit foods other children eat or bring in.

It's not the classes fault what the fuck are the other kids supposed to do not eat?
lilmacmama20
by Silver Member on Aug. 27, 2017 at 1:21 AM

BUMP!

Anonymous
by Anonymous 77 on Aug. 27, 2017 at 1:08 PM
Exactly. I was SO confused. About 100 kids are in the lunch hour with my daughter. ONE child comes in with a nut allergy and they adjust the ENTIRE lunch protocol to suit his allergy but were prepared to exclude my child because she literally couldn't conform to the protocol. I would have happily obliged the new rules if the school was willing to allow me to send her without a protein in her lunch but they wouldn't bend. There are TONS of tables in the lunch room. It's huge. They could easily have designated a table or even a few tables as nut free. My daughter would have been instructed to avoid sitting at those tables and wash her hands promptly after eating.

The whole "accomodation" thing has gotten so out of hand though that the only way to appease the rules, and probably to appease this child's mother, was to build the entire lunch room protocol around this child's needs. Nut allergies are common. Meat allergies are pretty rare, so they sided with what was familiar.

It's okay though. My daughter LOVES homeschooling and now has the freedom to excel. She knows not to eat what she's allergic to and will do great in life. I'm not sure how the peanut allergy child is going to fare, or his mother for that matter, when they realize the world isn't going to conform to his needs forever. Good luck heading into your first day in the office and informing everyone they now need to follow your diet restrictions. 😂

Quoting Anonymous 52: Wait so your daughter with an allergy was going to be forced to eat alone but NOT the BUT allergy kid? So bizarre! If a kid has an allergic reaction to anything they should know better not to go near the thing they are allergic to! Ffs!

Quoting Anonymous 77: I fully agree with you here. Our school district requires any lunch brought in by a child to be a balanced meal. It has to contain a fruit, vegetable, dairy, protein, and grain. It can also contain a dessert such as jello or pudding. No cookies, candy, soda, pie, cake, etc. the school will actually confiscate items that are against policy. If the lunch isn't balanced, they will serve the child a hot lunch and bill the parents. Needless to say, most parents just opt for hot lunch because the rules are insane.

Well, I had no choice but to pack my daughters lunch. She has an allergy to animal protein. If she eats a little, she gets cold symptoms but with very thick, copious amounts of mucous. If she eats more than a couple bites, it becomes vomiting, diarrhea, headaches, and a miserable rash. I would usually pack a peanut butter and jelly sandwich on whole grain bread and some fruits, veggies and string cheese. Other days, she would get granola clusters with raisins and soy milk to poor over it, a baggy of cashews and peanuts, carrot sticks with dressing and bottled water. Nuts are her main protein source.

In third grade, I received a letter from the school stating lunch time would be nut free to accommodate a child with allergies. They wanted to ensure he could safely eat with his peers. I went to the school and told them I respect their effort but my daughter doesn't have a choice. The school will either have to bend the lunch rule so she doesn't have to bring a protein for lunch or she'll continue bringing nuts. School principal said they can't bend the rules so my daughter will have to eat alone in a classroom. WTF?! my daughter was going to be punished for her allergy in order to accommodate another child's allergy. I said no, my daughter won't be secluded. The lunch room is huge. She can be sat on the opposite end. She knows she can't have meat and therefore doesn't eat it. If this kid has a nut allergy and is willing to cross the lunchroom and ask my daughter for her food, that child needs to be watched during lunch. Not my daughter. I even asked if my daughter eats in a classroom, are her friends free to join her? He said no.

School wouldn't budge on their lunch requirements and my daughter was not going to be kept prisoner in a classroom and away from her friends so now we homeschool. Accommodations are becoming ridiculous. Accommodating one child to the point that every other child pays for it. Life doesn't work that way.

Quoting Anonymous 52: So a class full of other children should be inconvenienced by one kid? Handicap ramps and elevators don't negatively affect everyone in the class. Wheelchairs don't but this could.


I have a huge problem with food accommodations actually.

Quoting Anonymous 61: I love your ignorance.

If the parents request a 594 under the ADA accommodations must be done or they will be in violation of federal law.

You can make a food free classroom and wipe hands before entering.

It's not that hard.

Quoting Anonymous 52: I would absolutely not make accommodations for him without a note AND besides letting him sit alone I wouldn't limit foods other children eat or bring in.

It's not the classes fault what the fuck are the other kids supposed to do not eat?
Anonymous
by Anonymous 52 on Aug. 28, 2017 at 1:11 AM
I agree it's ridiculous. I'm glad your daughter is getting her nutritional and educational needs met!

Quoting Anonymous 77: Exactly. I was SO confused. About 100 kids are in the lunch hour with my daughter. ONE child comes in with a nut allergy and they adjust the ENTIRE lunch protocol to suit his allergy but were prepared to exclude my child because she literally couldn't conform to the protocol. I would have happily obliged the new rules if the school was willing to allow me to send her without a protein in her lunch but they wouldn't bend. There are TONS of tables in the lunch room. It's huge. They could easily have designated a table or even a few tables as nut free. My daughter would have been instructed to avoid sitting at those tables and wash her hands promptly after eating.

The whole "accomodation" thing has gotten so out of hand though that the only way to appease the rules, and probably to appease this child's mother, was to build the entire lunch room protocol around this child's needs. Nut allergies are common. Meat allergies are pretty rare, so they sided with what was familiar.

It's okay though. My daughter LOVES homeschooling and now has the freedom to excel. She knows not to eat what she's allergic to and will do great in life. I'm not sure how the peanut allergy child is going to fare, or his mother for that matter, when they realize the world isn't going to conform to his needs forever. Good luck heading into your first day in the office and informing everyone they now need to follow your diet restrictions. 😂

Quoting Anonymous 52: Wait so your daughter with an allergy was going to be forced to eat alone but NOT the BUT allergy kid? So bizarre! If a kid has an allergic reaction to anything they should know better not to go near the thing they are allergic to! Ffs!

Quoting Anonymous 77: I fully agree with you here. Our school district requires any lunch brought in by a child to be a balanced meal. It has to contain a fruit, vegetable, dairy, protein, and grain. It can also contain a dessert such as jello or pudding. No cookies, candy, soda, pie, cake, etc. the school will actually confiscate items that are against policy. If the lunch isn't balanced, they will serve the child a hot lunch and bill the parents. Needless to say, most parents just opt for hot lunch because the rules are insane.

Well, I had no choice but to pack my daughters lunch. She has an allergy to animal protein. If she eats a little, she gets cold symptoms but with very thick, copious amounts of mucous. If she eats more than a couple bites, it becomes vomiting, diarrhea, headaches, and a miserable rash. I would usually pack a peanut butter and jelly sandwich on whole grain bread and some fruits, veggies and string cheese. Other days, she would get granola clusters with raisins and soy milk to poor over it, a baggy of cashews and peanuts, carrot sticks with dressing and bottled water. Nuts are her main protein source.

In third grade, I received a letter from the school stating lunch time would be nut free to accommodate a child with allergies. They wanted to ensure he could safely eat with his peers. I went to the school and told them I respect their effort but my daughter doesn't have a choice. The school will either have to bend the lunch rule so she doesn't have to bring a protein for lunch or she'll continue bringing nuts. School principal said they can't bend the rules so my daughter will have to eat alone in a classroom. WTF?! my daughter was going to be punished for her allergy in order to accommodate another child's allergy. I said no, my daughter won't be secluded. The lunch room is huge. She can be sat on the opposite end. She knows she can't have meat and therefore doesn't eat it. If this kid has a nut allergy and is willing to cross the lunchroom and ask my daughter for her food, that child needs to be watched during lunch. Not my daughter. I even asked if my daughter eats in a classroom, are her friends free to join her? He said no.

School wouldn't budge on their lunch requirements and my daughter was not going to be kept prisoner in a classroom and away from her friends so now we homeschool. Accommodations are becoming ridiculous. Accommodating one child to the point that every other child pays for it. Life doesn't work that way.

Quoting Anonymous 52: So a class full of other children should be inconvenienced by one kid? Handicap ramps and elevators don't negatively affect everyone in the class. Wheelchairs don't but this could.


I have a huge problem with food accommodations actually.

Quoting Anonymous 61: I love your ignorance.

If the parents request a 594 under the ADA accommodations must be done or they will be in violation of federal law.

You can make a food free classroom and wipe hands before entering.

It's not that hard.

Quoting Anonymous 52: I would absolutely not make accommodations for him without a note AND besides letting him sit alone I wouldn't limit foods other children eat or bring in.

It's not the classes fault what the fuck are the other kids supposed to do not eat?
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)