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Every childhood vaccine may go into a single jab

Anonymous
Posted by Anonymous
  • 11 Replies

Every childhood vaccine may go into a single jab

  • 15 September 2017

A technology that could eventually see every childhood vaccine delivered in a single injection has been developed by US researchers.

Their one-shot solution stores the vaccine in microscopic capsules that release the initial dose and then boosters at specific times.

The approach has been shown to work in mouse studies, described in the journal Science.

The researchers say the technology could help patients around the world.

Childhood immunisations come with tears and screams. And there are a lot of them.

  • Diphtheria, tetanus, whooping cough, polio, Hib and hepatitis B at eight, 12 and 16 weeks.
  • Pneumococcal jab at eight weeks, 16 weeks and one year
  • Men B vaccine at eight weeks, 16 weeks and one year
  • Hib/Men C vaccine at one year
  • Measles, mumps and rubella at one year and three years and four months

Source: NHS Choices

A team at Massachusetts Institute of Technology has designed a new type of micro-particle that could combine everything into a single jab.

The particles look like miniature coffee cups that are filled with vaccine and then sealed with a lid.

Crucially, the design of the cups can be altered so they break down and spill their contents at just the right time.

One set of tests showed the contents could be released at exactly nine, 20 and 41 days after they were injected into mice.

Other particles that last for hundreds of days have also been developed, the researchers say.

The approach has not yet been tested on patients.

'Significant impact'

Prof Robert Langer, from MIT, said: "We are very excited about this work.

"For the first time, we can create a library of tiny, encased vaccine particles, each programmed to release at a precise, predictable time, so that people could potentially receive a single injection that, in effect, would have multiple boosters already built into it.

"This could have a significant impact on patients everywhere, especially in the developing world."

The work differs from previous attempts, which slowly released medicines over a long period of time.

The idea is the short, sharp bursts of vaccine more closely mimic routine immunisation programmes.

Fellow researcher Dr Kevin McHugh said: "In the developing world, that might be the difference between not getting vaccinated and receiving all of your vaccines in one shot."

http://www.bbc.com/news/health-41269196

Posted by Anonymous on Sep. 16, 2017 at 9:30 AM
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Replies (1-10):
Anonymous
by Anonymous 2 on Sep. 16, 2017 at 9:39 AM
1 mom liked this

this has been talked about for 30yrs now and it's a horrible idea...if a person has a reaction to the first 'dose', how the hell do you get the rest of this time capsule removed from your child before the kid is dead?

Anonymous
by Anonymous 3 on Sep. 16, 2017 at 9:39 AM
Works for me
Anonymous
by Anonymous 2 on Sep. 16, 2017 at 9:40 AM

You tried it?

Quoting Anonymous 3: Works for me


Anonymous
by Anonymous 4 on Sep. 16, 2017 at 9:41 AM
Exactly. Im far from anti vax. My kids are fully vaxed and mainly on time but this would make me anti vax in a heartbeat.

Quoting Anonymous 2:

this has been talked about for 30yrs now and it's a horrible idea...if a person has a reaction to the first 'dose', how the hell do you get the rest of this time capsule removed from your child before the kid is dead?

Anonymous
by Anonymous 5 on Sep. 16, 2017 at 9:42 AM
The amount of toxins we breathe in drink and our skin absorbs is more concerning to me than some hyper murder vaccine.
EvaSerenity
by Bronze Member on Sep. 16, 2017 at 9:43 AM
Well that's just idiotic. :/
alt075
by Peace ❤ on Sep. 16, 2017 at 9:44 AM

First I am for immunization. Very strong advocate for it. However I do not believe one size fits all at the same time. So I see this as a bad idea also. As poster above said. If a kid has a reaction from the first one how do they prevent the second one then?

Anonymous
by Anonymous 2 on Sep. 16, 2017 at 9:45 AM

also sounds like  a new way to thin the 'herd'

Anonymous
by Anonymous 6 on Sep. 16, 2017 at 12:35 PM
If vaccinations are so safe why do we need new and improved ways to administer them? And like someone else said, what if there is a reaction? Do we really think having something, I am assuming some type of plastic, floating around our bodies for months on end is safe
Horticulturemom
by Member on Sep. 16, 2017 at 2:15 PM
I'm out on that.
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