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Kids with special needs should be in separate classrooms.

Anonymous
Posted by Anonymous
  • 85 Replies

This remark got me thinking....what say you about the idea?

Yay or nay?

Posted by Anonymous on Sep. 16, 2017 at 7:11 PM
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Replies (1-10):
Anonymous
by Anonymous 2 on Sep. 16, 2017 at 7:15 PM

It really depends. Is the kid a big distraction? If so, yes. You also have to consider how much help is available in the classroom( aids/ teacher to student ratio). Some kids may be able to handle the classroom, but not get all the help they need.

momtoBrenna
by Gold Member on Sep. 16, 2017 at 7:16 PM
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I think it depends on the level of special needs and the child's ability to learn the material while allowing the other students to learn as well.
Danesmommy1
by Grammar Enthusiast on Sep. 16, 2017 at 7:17 PM
Depends on the nature and severity of the SNs.
Anonymous
by Anonymous 3 on Sep. 16, 2017 at 7:17 PM
This

Quoting momtoBrenna: I think it depends on the level of special needs and the child's ability to learn the material while allowing the other students to learn as well.
Anonymous
by Anonymous 4 on Sep. 16, 2017 at 7:17 PM
3 moms liked this
I think kids with crazy mom's shoukd be in a separate class room
thebadkitty
by Platinum Member on Sep. 16, 2017 at 7:17 PM

Yes and no

Anonymous
by Anonymous 5 on Sep. 16, 2017 at 7:18 PM
My son has some developmental delays (no behavioral issues) and I prefer him being in resource for most of his classes. I don't think the answer is the same for every child as their needs and what environment they do the best in depends on the individual.
KairisMama
by Sapphire Member on Sep. 16, 2017 at 7:21 PM
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I'm a SPED teacher. There is not a single student on my caseload unable to function in a regular classroom. Just because they need extra help in math, reading, writing, or any combination of those areas, doesn't mean they belong in a separate setting.

Even those students with more severe physical or emotional disabilities can be successful in a regular classroom setting, with supports. Those who need a more self contained environment, are provided that, where I teach anyway. We've also provided some with 1:1 aide support throughout the entire school day. The goal is always the least restrictive environment to help promote success for the student.
Anonymous
by Anonymous 6 on Sep. 16, 2017 at 7:21 PM
It all depends on the child's abilities and strengths. By law each child is required to be placed in the least restricted environment to fit their needs. For som that's a regular classroom with supports for some that's a self contained classroom where they get therapies and learn life skills along with academics based on their own abilities.

My 11 year old would be considered special needs, she has high functioning autism and anxiety, she's also highly intelligent and would do terrible in a special ed classroom. She is in a regular classroom that follows a personalized learning model and goes to RSP 4 hours a week for support. She also has accommodations like taking tests in a different room, being able to leave the classroom if she needs to, wearing headphones at appropriate times and being allowed fidget cubes or stress balls. Yeah if you spent time in the classroom you might notice my kid is a little different but she participates in classroom activities and gets great grades. A special ed classroom would be doing her a disservice

Anonymous
by Anonymous 7 on Sep. 16, 2017 at 7:25 PM
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Yes yes yes. I speak from first hand experience. When a sn child is there so much of the teacher's attention is on that child and the rest of the class doesn't get what they need. I taught a severely autistic child with other children recently. That one child demanded an incredible amount of energy and attention and super hyper vigilance from me that I couldn't help the other children learn as much or give them attention they deserved. I ran myself ragged. It just doesn't work in many cases where needs are so high. In all, what I saw was the "inclusion" mantra trump actual learning. Because, the rest of my kids were cheated and there was nothing I could do about it.
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