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Moms who taught ASL to their babies

Anonymous
Posted by Anonymous
  • 47 Replies
While teaching dd to talk we also taught sign language.

Now that she's in preschool she's very shy. She's had some issues with not responding to the teacher because she's so shy. However she does sign things to her teacher with no issues. The issue with that is that her teacher doesn't know asl and would obviously prefer she use her words.

Did anyone else have this happen? How do I get dd to talk more? This is only the 3rd week of school so she's still adjusting.
Posted by Anonymous on Sep. 25, 2017 at 10:50 PM
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Replies (1-10):
thebadkitty
by Gold Member on Sep. 25, 2017 at 10:57 PM

Well... I didnt teach my kids sign I wish I had. My first was extremely shy and limited in voice. As matter of fact she refused to speak until she was nearly 2 and a half almost three. One day she spoke full sentences.

The thing about ASL is that there is a debate about teaching the deaf/hard of hearing sign as people feel it limits them from using their voice. This is true and false and really depends how the parents encourage kids with hearing disabilities. For example if you only teach them to sign and not use their voice they will do just that. If you teach them sign and also teach them voice they will do that. If you dont teach sign and only use voice they will do just that.

Now I am guessing you didn't really encourage your child to use her voice so she selected to use sign more? If this is the case you probably need to teach your child to use her voice. I mean think about it as a person with hearing impairment learning to speak requires practice. If you don't practice it is hard to do. Same with learning to talk to other people.

Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on Sep. 25, 2017 at 11:04 PM
I'm conflicted. I don't know if it's a voice problem or a school problem.

She doesn't have a problem talking at home or around friends and family. No one in our family knows ASL. She might use signs for simple things like "milk" "thank you" "yes/no" etc. and if the person doesn't understand we tell her to use her words and she does.

If her teacher presses for her to use her words her face turns red and sometimes she starts to cry(this is what her teacher told me).

Quoting thebadkitty:

Well... I didnt teach my kids sign I wish I had. My first was extremely shy and limited in voice. As matter of fact she refused to speak until she was nearly 2 and a half almost three. One day she spoke full sentences.

The thing about ASL is that there is a debate about teaching the deaf/hard of hearing sign as people feel it limits them from using their voice. This is true and false and really depends how the parents encourage kids with hearing disabilities. For example if you only teach them to sign and not use their voice they will do just that. If you teach them sign and also teach them voice they will do that. If you dont teach sign and only use voice they will do just that.

Now I am guessing you didn't really encourage your child to use her voice so she selected to use sign more? If this is the case you probably need to teach your child to use her voice. I mean think about it as a person with hearing impairment learning to speak requires practice. If you don't practice it is hard to do. Same with learning to talk to other people.

MamaNeeNee
by Silver Member on Sep. 25, 2017 at 11:08 PM

Do you guys talk or sign at home? 

All three of my children learned basic signs as babies but we didn't go any further than that.  Once they could speak back, we basically stopped using the signs so much.  So far, we have never had any problems like this. 
I'd just explain to the teacher that she knows how to sign and she'll learn the expectations for school. 

susannah2000
by Ruby Member on Sep. 25, 2017 at 11:12 PM

She is still adjusting. Keep reminding her that she needs to talk in school. There is no reason to use sign after the child can speak. She shouldn't be allowed to sign at home any longer, and shouldn't have since she learned to speak.

thebadkitty
by Gold Member on Sep. 25, 2017 at 11:12 PM

ok well at least I know she is verbal and uses it. I don't know my daughter was the same way she really took awhile to talk with new people. When she met new people she flat would not talk. I think maybe doing play dates, getting her active in some form of activity might help her. While shyness will never go away you can help them overcome shyness. You may also want to talk to your daughter about using her voice with the teacher since the teacher does not know sign.

My daughter did eventually get over her extreme shyness. I kept her involved throughout grade school and I believe it helped. She has some anxiety, will be shy at first, but once she gets past the new person mode she is good to go.

Quoting Anonymous 1: I'm conflicted. I don't know if it's a voice problem or a school problem. She doesn't have a problem talking at home or around friends and family. No one in our family knows ASL. She might use signs for simple things like "milk" "thank you" "yes/no" etc. and if the person doesn't understand we tell her to use her words and she does. If her teacher presses for her to use her words her face turns red and sometimes she starts to cry(this is what her teacher told me).
Quoting thebadkitty:

Well... I didnt teach my kids sign I wish I had. My first was extremely shy and limited in voice. As matter of fact she refused to speak until she was nearly 2 and a half almost three. One day she spoke full sentences.

The thing about ASL is that there is a debate about teaching the deaf/hard of hearing sign as people feel it limits them from using their voice. This is true and false and really depends how the parents encourage kids with hearing disabilities. For example if you only teach them to sign and not use their voice they will do just that. If you teach them sign and also teach them voice they will do that. If you dont teach sign and only use voice they will do just that.

Now I am guessing you didn't really encourage your child to use her voice so she selected to use sign more? If this is the case you probably need to teach your child to use her voice. I mean think about it as a person with hearing impairment learning to speak requires practice. If you don't practice it is hard to do. Same with learning to talk to other people.


Anonymous
by Anonymous 2 on Sep. 25, 2017 at 11:14 PM
We taught our oldest ASL but not to help communicate with us...but because we have a bunch of deaf friends and we wanted her to be able to communicate with them and their children. She always spoke to us. We never had an issue in school.
Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on Sep. 25, 2017 at 11:19 PM
We do not sign but she does occasionally.

For example, if she's playing with her toys and I ask what she wants to drink she will sign "milk", or if she is eating she signs a little more than normal when her mouth if full. She also signs more when she's sick or tired.

That said, we are often around people who don't know ASL so if she signs to them we just tell her to use her words and she has no problem using her words. It's different at school though.

Quoting MamaNeeNee:

Do you guys talk or sign at home? 

All three of my children learned basic signs as babies but we didn't go any further than that.  Once they could speak back, we basically stopped using the signs so much.  So far, we have never had any problems like this. I'd just explain to the teacher that she knows how to sign and she'll learn the expectations for school. 

Anonymous
by Anonymous 2 on Sep. 25, 2017 at 11:20 PM
Well that's not true. ASL is a very useful language and there are reasons to use it and practice it. She just needs to be encouraged to use spoken language with hearing people. Just like a Spanish/English bilingual person would not get far speaking only Spanish in an all English class...she needs to learn when it is appropriate to use the languages she speaks.

Quoting susannah2000:

She is still adjusting. Keep reminding her that she needs to talk in school. There is no reason to use sign after the child can speak. She shouldn't be allowed to sign at home any longer, and shouldn't have since she learned to speak.

MamaNeeNee
by Silver Member on Sep. 25, 2017 at 11:23 PM

I would suggest telling her to use words more at home when she signs things and she's able to talk.  And explain to her that at school she must use words. She will understand. She's about 5 or so right? 

Quoting Anonymous 1: We do not sign but she does occasionally. For example, if she's playing with her toys and I ask what she wants to drink she will sign "milk", or if she is eating she signs a little more than normal when her mouth if full. She also signs more when she's sick or tired. That said, we are often around people who don't know ASL so if she signs to them we just tell her to use her words and she has no problem using her words. It's different at school though.
Quoting MamaNeeNee:

Do you guys talk or sign at home? 

All three of my children learned basic signs as babies but we didn't go any further than that.  Once they could speak back, we basically stopped using the signs so much.  So far, we have never had any problems like this. I'd just explain to the teacher that she knows how to sign and she'll learn the expectations for school. 


Anonymous
by Anonymous 3 on Sep. 25, 2017 at 11:24 PM
Mine refused to speak in public until she was 7. Her Sunday school teacher actually asked me what her diagnosis was. I told her she was perfectly fine, she was just shy. She rarely even signed. She just had nothing gbshe wanted to say. Once we started homeschooling, though, she opened right up. Now she only signs songs, I'm not even sure she even remembers a lot of the signs she learned as a baby.
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