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Dog seizures

Anonymous
Posted by Anonymous
  • 27 Replies
Our chihuahua has seizures a few times a week. We've tried a few meds, none of them have helped. We can't afford the what the vet called several thousand dollars worth of tests to figure out why and end them. What are some ways I can help her while she's having one? We sit with her in our lap in a dark corner softly talking to her through it all but there has to be more than we can do.
Posted by Anonymous on Nov. 19, 2017 at 12:39 PM
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PinkButterfly66
by Sapphire Member on Nov. 19, 2017 at 12:43 PM

http://www.americanveterinarian.com/news/ketogenic-diet-linked-to-seizure-reduction-in-dogs-with-epilepsy

Ketogenic Diet Linked to Seizure Reduction in Dogs with Epilepsy

A ketogenic diet rich in medium-chain triacylgylycerols achieved clinically meaningful levels of ketosis and helped prevent seizures in dogs with epilepsy, according to a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover trial.
By Amy Karon, DVM, MPH

A ketogenic diet rich in medium-chain triacylgylycerols (TAG) achieved clinically meaningful levels of ketosis and helped prevent seizures in dogs with epilepsy, according to a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled,crossover trial published in the British Journal of Nutrition.
 
Of 21 dogs in the trial, three became seizure-free, and another seven experienced at least a 50% drop in seizure frequency while on the diet, said Tsz Hong Law, BSc, MRes, of the Royal Veterinary College in Hatfield, United Kingdom.
 
Epilepsy affects an estimated 0.6% to 0.75% of dogs, making it one of the most common canine neurological disorders. Seizures in about a third of affected dogs are refractory to currently available treatments, the investigators noted. “A myriad of anecdotal reports and some published literature have suggested the importance of dietary manipulation in seizure management,” they added. A ketogenic diet, which is characterized by a high ratio of fat compared with protein and carbohydrates, has been used in human epilepsy since the early 1920s, but this and other nonpharmacologic treatments for epilepsy are not used in routine veterinary practice, and seldom have been studied in dogs.
 
Therefore, the researchers recruited 18 purebred and three mixed-breed adult dogs with a diagnosis of idiopathic epilepsy and a history of at least three seizures in the past 3 months. The dogs averaged 4.6 years of age and were as old as 12 years. All were receiving phenobarbital, and 18 dogs also were receiving potassium bromide for seizure control.
 
The diet consisted of Nestlé Purina PetCare dry kibble containing at least 28% crude protein and at least 15% crude fat. The ketogenic diet was formulated so that 10% of its calories were from added medium-chain TAG, while the placebo diet contained the caloric equivalent of lard. Both formulas exceeded minimum requirements for essential fatty acids set by the American Association of Feed Control Officials, the investigators noted. The dogs were not allowed to have treats or other food. The trial lasted six months, and all dogs switched diets at month 3.
 
When looking at the group as a whole, the diet achieved a modest (13%) reduction in seizure frequency from an average of 2.67 to 2.31 episodes per month (P = .02). However, 48% of dogs had either no seizures or at least a 50% improvement in seizure frequency while on the ketogenic diet as compared with the control diet. Another five (38%) dogs had a less than 50% reduction in seizures, while six (28%) dogs had no response.
 
Dogs also had significantly higher blood levels of β-hydroxybutyrate while consuming the intervention diet compared with the placebo diet, which confirmed the diet’s ketogenic effect, the researchers said. Moreover, the diet did not affect blood levels of glucose, phenobarbital, or potassium bromide, and was not linked to weight gain. “By maintaining clinically effective levels of ketosis and anticonvulsant efficacy, this research indicates that more carbohydrates, although still a ketogenic diet, can be utilized to increase palatability, nutrient balance, compliance, and acceptability of the diet,” they added.
 
The medium-chain fatty acids in the ketogenic diet primarily included octanoic acid and decanoic TAG, which are digested and absorbed more efficiently than long-chain TAG, the researchers said. The diet also appeared to reduce ADHD-like behaviors, including the “chase” impulse and fear of strangers, according to a separate analysis of the same trial. Furthermore, a version of this diet also has been found to enhance cognitive function in older dogs, the investigators noted.
 
Past trials of canine epilepsy have suffered from a “placebo effect,” in which owners reported up to a 46% reduction in seizures when their dogs were on placebo, the researchers noted. “The placebo response is thought to originate from bias in the owners’ observations and data collection, which is influenced by the positive attitudes of owners towards respective intervention treatment,” they added. This trial was not subject to the placebo effect because dogs were fed both the intervention diet and the control diet, they noted.
 
The research was supported by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council and by Nestlé Purina. Nestlé Purina did not help recruit cases or handle, analyze, or store data, and could not prevent publication of the manuscript.
 
Dr. Amy Karon earned her doctorate in veterinary medicine and master’s degrees in public health and journalism from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She was an infectious disease epidemiologist and “disease detective” (EIS officer) with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention before becoming a full-time medical writer. She lives in the San Francisco Bay area, where she volunteers for the local Humane Society.

Personally, I wouldn't feed my dog anything made by Purina, their food was involved in the Chinese melamine contamination recall that killed all those dogs and cats.  I would feed your little guy a raw homemade diet supplementing with doggie vitamins.  And you can get bottles of medium chained oil at your health food store that you can put in his food.
Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on Nov. 19, 2017 at 12:46 PM
I'm confused by raw. Raw meat, raw veggies? I had heard that people food can cause them.

Quoting PinkButterfly66:

http://www.americanveterinarian.com/news/ketogenic-diet-linked-to-seizure-reduction-in-dogs-with-epilepsy

Ketogenic Diet Linked to Seizure Reduction in Dogs with Epilepsy

A ketogenic diet rich in medium-chain triacylgylycerols achieved clinically meaningful levels of ketosis and helped prevent seizures in dogs with epilepsy, according to a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover trial.
By Amy Karon, DVM, MPH

A ketogenic diet rich in medium-chain triacylgylycerols (TAG) achieved clinically meaningful levels of ketosis and helped prevent seizures in dogs with epilepsy, according to a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled,crossover trial published in the British Journal of Nutrition. Of 21 dogs in the trial, three became seizure-free, and another seven experienced at least a 50% drop in seizure frequency while on the diet, said Tsz Hong Law, BSc, MRes, of the Royal Veterinary College in Hatfield, United Kingdom. Epilepsy affects an estimated 0.6% to 0.75% of dogs, making it one of the most common canine neurological disorders. Seizures in about a third of affected dogs are refractory to currently available treatments, the investigators noted. “A myriad of anecdotal reports and some published literature have suggested the importance of dietary manipulation in seizure management,” they added. A ketogenic diet, which is characterized by a high ratio of fat compared with protein and carbohydrates, has been used in human epilepsy since the early 1920s, but this and other nonpharmacologic treatments for epilepsy are not used in routine veterinary practice, and seldom have been studied in dogs. Therefore, the researchers recruited 18 purebred and three mixed-breed adult dogs with a diagnosis of idiopathic epilepsy and a history of at least three seizures in the past 3 months. The dogs averaged 4.6 years of age and were as old as 12 years. All were receiving phenobarbital, and 18 dogs also were receiving potassium bromide for seizure control. The diet consisted of Nestlé Purina PetCare dry kibble containing at least 28% crude protein and at least 15% crude fat. The ketogenic diet was formulated so that 10% of its calories were from added medium-chain TAG, while the placebo diet contained the caloric equivalent of lard. Both formulas exceeded minimum requirements for essential fatty acids set by the American Association of Feed Control Officials, the investigators noted. The dogs were not allowed to have treats or other food. The trial lasted six months, and all dogs switched diets at month 3. When looking at the group as a whole, the diet achieved a modest (13%) reduction in seizure frequency from an average of 2.67 to 2.31 episodes per month (P = .02). However, 48% of dogs had either no seizures or at least a 50% improvement in seizure frequency while on the ketogenic diet as compared with the control diet. Another five (38%) dogs had a less than 50% reduction in seizures, while six (28%) dogs had no response. Dogs also had significantly higher blood levels of β-hydroxybutyrate while consuming the intervention diet compared with the placebo diet, which confirmed the diet’s ketogenic effect, the researchers said. Moreover, the diet did not affect blood levels of glucose, phenobarbital, or potassium bromide, and was not linked to weight gain. “By maintaining clinically effective levels of ketosis and anticonvulsant efficacy, this research indicates that more carbohydrates, although still a ketogenic diet, can be utilized to increase palatability, nutrient balance, compliance, and acceptability of the diet,” they added. The medium-chain fatty acids in the ketogenic diet primarily included octanoic acid and decanoic TAG, which are digested and absorbed more efficiently than long-chain TAG, the researchers said. The diet also appeared to reduce ADHD-like behaviors, including the “chase” impulse and fear of strangers, according to a separate analysis of the same trial. Furthermore, a version of this diet also has been found to enhance cognitive function in older dogs, the investigators noted. Past trials of canine epilepsy have suffered from a “placebo effect,” in which owners reported up to a 46% reduction in seizures when their dogs were on placebo, the researchers noted. “The placebo response is thought to originate from bias in the owners’ observations and data collection, which is influenced by the positive attitudes of owners towards respective intervention treatment,” they added. This trial was not subject to the placebo effect because dogs were fed both the intervention diet and the control diet, they noted. The research was supported by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council and by Nestlé Purina. Nestlé Purina did not help recruit cases or handle, analyze, or store data, and could not prevent publication of the manuscript. 
Dr. Amy Karon earned her doctorate in veterinary medicine and master’s degrees in public health and journalism from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She was an infectious disease epidemiologist and “disease detective” (EIS officer) with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention before becoming a full-time medical writer. She lives in the San Francisco Bay area, where she volunteers for the local Humane Society.
Personally, I wouldn't feed my dog anything made by Purina, their food was involved in the Chinese melamine contamination recall that killed all those dogs and cats.  I would feed your little guy a raw homemade diet supplementing with doggie vitamins.  And you can get bottles of medium chained oil at your health food store that you can put in his food.
Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on Nov. 19, 2017 at 12:54 PM
Bump
PinkButterfly66
by Sapphire Member on Nov. 19, 2017 at 12:58 PM

Yes, raw meat, bones, veggies.  There are lots of websites out there for raw food diet recipes for dogs and cats.  As long as the food is fresh, you don't have to worry.  I fed my cats raw for a while but it became too much when my health declined.  They thrived on it.  You can even cook the meat lightly if you want. When you feed your dog homemade diet, you control the ingredients.  You want to give him very little carbs and about 80% healthy fat.  That can come from eggs,  butter, coconut oil or nut oil.  This diet has the potential to reduce the number of seizures your dog has, an even eliminate them altogether.  

A sample diet would be:  canned salmon and some steamed broccoli with MCT oil or eggs, full fat yogurt (get one that zero extra ingredients like Fage), and steamed kale.  The key is restricting carbs and increasing the fat in the diet. You can pick up keto urine strips to test his urine to make sure he stays in ketosis.

The keto diet for reducing seizures has been around a long time.  It was lost in medical obscurity for a while but has since become more popular as people who have epilepsy sought a more natural approach.  So you'll be able to find a lot of info on the diet as well as specifically for seizure reduction.  The keto diet is now being used for weight loss, reversing type 2 diabetes, and controlling tics in Tourette's syndrome. 


Quoting Anonymous 1: I'm confused by raw. Raw meat, raw veggies? I had heard that people food can cause them.


amberdotsmom
by on Nov. 19, 2017 at 1:04 PM

I don't know about raw diet/keto for seizures specfically but I do know raw diet is doable for dogs.  The one I'm most familiar with is Harlow a service dog whose owner posts on You Tube: Chronically Jacquie.

Here's a link to one of her raw diet videos and you'll see she has more that help explain what she feeds Harlowe and why.  Basically the dog gets raw meat, veggies/veggie pops and healthy fats in a certain percentage of each.  Harlow seems to be thriving and she swears the diet has helped her dogs overall health so it is possible, maybe even healthier for animals that need it.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d4kkBBbuHYw

Quoting Anonymous 1: I'm confused by raw. Raw meat, raw veggies? I had heard that people food can cause them
Happy Mom of Amber('98), Daniel('96), Meghan & Claire-Ann ('93)
Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on Nov. 19, 2017 at 1:05 PM
1 mom liked this
That is some great information. Thank you so much.

Quoting PinkButterfly66:

Yes, raw meat, bones, veggies.  There are lots of websites out there for raw food diet recipes for dogs and cats.  As long as the food is fresh, you don't have to worry.  I fed my cats raw for a while but it became too much when my health declined.  They thrived on it.  You can even cook the meat lightly if you want. When you feed your dog homemade diet, you control the ingredients.  You want to give him very little carbs and about 80% healthy fat.  That can come from eggs,  butter, coconut oil or nut oil.  This diet has the potential to reduce the number of seizures your dog has, an even eliminate them altogether.  

A sample diet would be:  canned salmon and some steamed broccoli with MCT oil or eggs, full fat yogurt (get one that zero extra ingredients like Fage), and steamed kale.  The key is restricting carbs and increasing the fat in the diet. You can pick up keto urine strips to test his urine to make sure he stays in ketosis.

The keto diet for reducing seizures has been around a long time.  It was lost in medical obscurity for a while but has since become more popular as people who have epilepsy sought a more natural approach.  So you'll be able to find a lot of info on the diet as well as specifically for seizure reduction.  The keto diet is now being used for weight loss, reversing type 2 diabetes, and controlling tics in Tourette's syndrome. 

Quoting Anonymous 1: I'm confused by raw. Raw meat, raw veggies? I had heard that people food can cause them.

Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on Nov. 19, 2017 at 1:06 PM
I'll check that out, thank you.

Quoting amberdotsmom:

I don't know about raw diet/keto for seizures specfically but I do know raw diet is doable for dogs.  The one I'm most familiar with is Harlow a service dog whose owner posts on You Tube: Chronically Jacquie.

Here's a link to one of her raw diet videos and you'll see she has more that help explain what she feeds Harlowe and why.  Basically the dog gets raw meat, veggies/veggie pops and healthy fats in a certain percentage of each.  Harlow seems to be thriving and she swears the diet has helped her dogs overall health so it is possible, maybe even healthier for animals that need it.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d4kkBBbuHYw

Quoting Anonymous 1: I'm confused by raw. Raw meat, raw veggies? I had heard that people food can cause them
Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on Nov. 19, 2017 at 2:56 PM
Bump
Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on Nov. 19, 2017 at 3:02 PM
Bump
Reading.Rainbow
by Mad Martigan on Nov. 19, 2017 at 3:06 PM

Are you in a marijuana friendly state?

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