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If you live outside the United States, a curious question

Anonymous
Posted by Anonymous
  • 33 Replies
I'm American obviously. However, another post made me wonder. In the states, if someone doesn't finish high school they have the option to take the GED which is almost the same as a high school degree. In other countries, do they offer the same? If so, is it called a GED or something else? Thank you.

I readily admit I'm am ignorant about the subject which is why asked. And for the record, I prefer adult conversation so if you are looking to act less than that then I will not respond or acknowledge.
Posted by Anonymous on Nov. 24, 2017 at 7:42 AM
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Replies (1-10):
STVUstudent
by Ruby Member on Nov. 24, 2017 at 7:46 AM

I don't know the answer, but when I lived in Sicily several years ago, among the Sicilian families that I knew there just was no option to not finish school.  But, among the imigrant comunities, like the gypsies, there was no education.  The kids went to work at a very early age.  So, here's a bump for you.  I am curious also.

Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on Nov. 24, 2017 at 7:47 AM
Thank you:)

Quoting STVUstudent:

I don't know the answer, but when I lived in Sicily several years ago, among the Sicilian families that I knew there just was no option to not finish school.  But, among the imigrant comunities, like the gypsies, there was no education.  The kids went to work at a very early age.  So, here's a bump for you.  I am curious also.

Anonymous
by Anonymous 2 on Nov. 24, 2017 at 7:48 AM
I'm in Canada and there is a GED program here.
Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on Nov. 24, 2017 at 7:50 AM
Oh. Thanks so much. I graduated high school myself and start college in January. Until I read the suspension post, I had never thought about whether a GED is universal.

Quoting Anonymous 2: I'm in Canada and there is a GED program here.
lollip0p
by Ruby Member on Nov. 24, 2017 at 7:53 AM
Its not called a GED in the UK. But u also don't 'graduate high school. U sit 'highers' which are exams for specific subjects and upon passing the exams they count as qualifications. If u leave school with no higher there are college programmes called HNCs that can get into uni. Sorry if I'm not being clear. Just a very different system
Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on Nov. 24, 2017 at 7:58 AM
Actually that makes perfect sense. It's kind of like you have to have credits to graduate high school here but in the U.K., you have to have a certain amount of highers to go to colleges/universities. If you don't get them, you have to take classes to earn them. It's rather a simplistic way of me understanding but that's what I gathered from your explanation. Thank you.

Quoting lollip0p: Its not called a GED in the UK. But u also don't 'graduate high school. U sit 'highers' which are exams for specific subjects and upon passing the exams they count as qualifications. If u leave school with no higher there are college programmes called HNCs that can get into uni. Sorry if I'm not being clear. Just a very different system
Manth
by on Nov. 24, 2017 at 7:58 AM

Here in Australia you don't get a 'degree' or 'diploma' for finishing High School. Different states have a certificate you can achieve (in my state, South Australia, it's SACE - the South Australia Certificate of Education) BUT you have to complete High School to Year 12 to get it. There is no option to drop out of school and do an 'alternative program' to get your SACE. 

Having a SACE does NOT guarantee you entry to University either. There are classes you do that lead you to a University degree if you wish (most of them with externally assessed exams) and your marks for the SACE classes do effect your University entrance score but it's handled differently to the US. You do NOT apply to the University or College directly but to an external agency that assigns you to a degree based on that score (which you can accept or hold out for a better placement).

My older dd got an excellent score (in the top 10% of the state) and went on to her first choice of a degree (engineering) and is now working in that field. My younger dd got a mid-level score, was offered her second choice of degree (Bachelor of Science) and is (for a number of reasons) struggling in her course. She's trying, but she has a mental illness and also physical limitations that make things much more difficult than it was for her older sister. Yes she's in therapy (both psychology and physiotherapy) which are making a difference but it will always be harder for her to get ahead.

Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on Nov. 24, 2017 at 8:00 AM
Very interesting. Thank you:)

Quoting Manth:

Here in Australia you don't get a 'degree' or 'diploma' for finishing High School. Different states have a certificate you can achieve (in my state, South Australia, it's SACE - the South Australia Certificate of Education) BUT you have to complete High School to Year 12 to get it. There is no option to drop out of school and do an 'alternative program' to get your SACE. 

Having a SACE does NOT guarantee you entry to University either. There are classes you do that lead you to a University degree if you wish (most of them with externally assessed exams) and your marks for the SACE classes do effect your University entrance score but it's handled differently to the US. You do NOT apply to the University or College directly but to an external agency that assigns you to a degree based on that score (which you can accept or hold out for a better placement).

My older dd got an excellent score (in the top 10% of the state) and went on to her first choice of a degree (engineering) and is now working in that field. My younger dd got a mid-level score, was offered her second choice of degree (Bachelor of Science) and is (for a number of reasons) struggling in her course. She's trying, but she has a mental illness and also physical limitations that make things much more difficult than it was for her older sister. Yes she's in therapy (both psychology and physiotherapy) which are making a difference but it will always be harder for her to get ahead.

Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on Nov. 24, 2017 at 8:03 AM
I just thought of something. What if someone doesn't go to grade 12 and decided that they want to later? Can an older person enroll back in the program to go to grade 12 and then take the Test to enter universities/colleges? Like I said, I'm ignorant lol.

Quoting Manth:

Here in Australia you don't get a 'degree' or 'diploma' for finishing High School. Different states have a certificate you can achieve (in my state, South Australia, it's SACE - the South Australia Certificate of Education) BUT you have to complete High School to Year 12 to get it. There is no option to drop out of school and do an 'alternative program' to get your SACE. 

Having a SACE does NOT guarantee you entry to University either. There are classes you do that lead you to a University degree if you wish (most of them with externally assessed exams) and your marks for the SACE classes do effect your University entrance score but it's handled differently to the US. You do NOT apply to the University or College directly but to an external agency that assigns you to a degree based on that score (which you can accept or hold out for a better placement).

My older dd got an excellent score (in the top 10% of the state) and went on to her first choice of a degree (engineering) and is now working in that field. My younger dd got a mid-level score, was offered her second choice of degree (Bachelor of Science) and is (for a number of reasons) struggling in her course. She's trying, but she has a mental illness and also physical limitations that make things much more difficult than it was for her older sister. Yes she's in therapy (both psychology and physiotherapy) which are making a difference but it will always be harder for her to get ahead.

desertlvn
by Platinum Member on Nov. 24, 2017 at 8:07 AM
Can you sit highers as many times as you want? Or do you only have one chance?

Quoting lollip0p: Its not called a GED in the UK. But u also don't 'graduate high school. U sit 'highers' which are exams for specific subjects and upon passing the exams they count as qualifications. If u leave school with no higher there are college programmes called HNCs that can get into uni. Sorry if I'm not being clear. Just a very different system
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