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do our kids all grow up to design video games???

Posted by on Nov. 18, 2011 at 8:30 AM
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 Hi all!  Ok, so my title has a bit of irony in it, but here's the deal...I keep reading all these stories about grown unschooled kids who, at the age of 14ish, design these amazing video game/computer applications and strike it rich, from there to ride into the bliss of wealthy adulthood. 

I think these stories are great, but what about all the grown unschoolers who pursue other professions?  There must be some right, LOL???  So, tell me about the grown unschoolers you know, what fields have you known or heard about them going into?

by on Nov. 18, 2011 at 8:30 AM
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Replies (1-8):
dedicatedrider
by Member on Nov. 18, 2011 at 8:48 AM

Here's a blog written by a grown unschooler:  http://un-schooled.net/

I don't personally know anyone who was unschooled.

my2.5boys
by Member on Nov. 18, 2011 at 8:54 AM

Here's another blog, written by a grown unschooler. Not all unschoolers are going to grow up and strike it rich, and making sure my kids make a lot of money isn't high on my list of priorities. I just want my kids to be happy and feel fulfilled by what they do, no matter if that's designing video games or cleaning toilets. From what I've gathered, a lot of unschoolers go into more artistic or creative fields, but that's just my general perception. 

jen2150
by Member on Nov. 18, 2011 at 9:13 AM

I don't know about recent unschoolers since all the ones I know are still young and learning at home.  Nikola Tesla is a great example of an unschooler, Michael Faraday and so many others in history.  Some of them went to school and didn't do well and eventually struck on their own and learned so much more.  Tesla always did well in school academically but socially was bullied by his peers and misunderstood by his teachers because of his brilliance.  He went on to design our electrical system, invent radio, and many other things.  Too many to list.  My husband is self educated.  He never went to college but know more than most of my college professors.  He taught himself to read.  His Mom was a teacher and when he was young he would go with her and listen while she taught.  By the time she went to teach him to read he already most of what he needed to know.  She taught in  very small private schools in remote areas. Unschoolers are not a new invention.  We just used to call them self educated.  Abraham Lincoln, Jack London and countless others were self educated. 

30aisling
by Group Admin on Nov. 18, 2011 at 10:02 AM

 Great, keep the replies coming, this is interesting!  On an aside, I hope everyone understands I'm teasing about the computer field, I have nothing against that as a legitimate career choice!  Also, neither is it my goal for my kids to have boat loads of money, that's not what leads to a fulfilled life.  I grew up in a working class family with three younger brothers and a stay at home mom, we didn't have a lot, but we had what we needed.  My parents did a great job teaching us what was really valuable in life, personally I think materialism can be a real road block to a happy life.

usmom3
by on Nov. 18, 2011 at 10:27 AM

 Here is an article about 

The Worlds 15 most Extraordinary homeschoolers

(some of them are unschoolers)

 http://www.thebestcolleges.org/the-worlds-15-most-extraordinary-homeschoolers/

jessradtke
by on Nov. 18, 2011 at 4:25 PM

There was an older unschoolers panel at an unschooling gatherings I went to a few years ago. It was interesting, but I was still a little disappointed with it in some ways. My primary reason for going was to hear what kids who had always been unschooled were doing, but all of the young adults on that particular panel were pulled out of school when they were older. All of them learned "the basics" in school and just "finished" their learning at home. I was especially surprised to find out that several of them were in college to become teachers. Some of them, like Cameron Lovejoy, were doing more interesting things though. I'll spare you my spotty recollections about the rest of it. Suffice it to say that I have since met more grown unschoolers and found out about even more on the internet. They most definitely are not all computer programmers and game designers! lol If you do a search for grown unschoolers you'll find more than a few good blogs, interviews and articles, but here are a few to get you started:

http://yes-i-can-write.blogspot.com/2009/09/list-of-blogs-by-teenage-and-grown.html

http://mcintyrekids.com/adult-unschoolers/

http://eligerzon.wordpress.com/2009/07/01/links-to-successful-unschoolers/

http://homeedmag.com/newscomm/5763/unschooling-hacking-an-education/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unschooling (scroll down to the part about adult unschoolers)

http://www.unschooler.com/2011/09/16-grown-unschoolers-panel/

http://enjoylifeunschooling.com/2010/06/interview-julian-baptista-grown-unschooler-musician/

http://radiofreeschool.blogspot.com/2011/04/sean-ritchey-grown-unschooler.html

http://kelly.halldorson.com/blog/?p=1643

 

jessradtke
by on Nov. 18, 2011 at 4:38 PM

How could I forget Erik Demaine! There's an interview with him here:

http://radiofreeschool.blogspot.com/2006/12/go-figure.html

He was also interviewed in the documentary Between the Folds which we watched on netflix a while back.

If you have the chance to see this documentary, it's worth it:

http://grownwithoutschooling.com/

At least one of the links I already posted was to an interview with the filmmaker.

And I think this one includes a few that the other list on her blog didn't include:

http://yes-i-can-write.blogspot.com/2010/05/unschooling-grows-up-collection-of.html

LindaClement
by Group Owner on Nov. 18, 2011 at 5:01 PM

Neither of my kids did anything like that. And they're still happily finding their feet, as young adults.

One took fashion design in college, a program she's happy to have taken, but feels cost too much for what it offered. She's an awesome seamstress, but does little of it.

T'other is a professional photographer, though underfunded as a business startup, so she's mostly doing other things. She also took a college program she now feels wasn't worth the money involved. She learned a lot, but is not convinced she could not have done so without it.

The both work in food services, and one in childcare, dabbling in their trades on the side. They support themselves but are absolutely not doing what they're planning on doing with the rest of their work lives.

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