Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

Santorum Concedes Need For Obamacare, Says His Special Needs Child Took Up Much Of His Income

Posted by on Mar. 4, 2012 at 10:26 AM
  • 27 Replies

Santorum Concedes Need For Obamacare, Says His Special Needs Child Took Up Much Of His Income

On Fox News Sunday this morning, Chris Wallace challenged Rick Santorum on why he’s given such a small percentage of his salary to charity (1.76 percent) compared to Mitt Romney (13.8 percent) and President Obama (14.2 percent). Santorum explained that he was unable to give because the costs of caring for his daughter Bella — who has a severe genetic disorder — were so high because they are not covered by his insurance:

SANTORUM: Well, we always need to do better. I was in a situation where we have seven children and one disabled child who we take care of, and she’s very, very expensive. We love her and we cherish the opportunity to take care of her, but it’s an additional expense. We have to have around-the-clock care for her, and our insurance company doesn’t cover it so I have to cover it.

Watch it:

Santorum has a million dollar income, and yet, still struggles to support the medical costs of his daughter.

By admitting that the health care system has created a financial burden for families, Santorum is essentially conceding the need for the Affordable Care Act. Even though he has repeatedly claimed that children like Bella would receive inferior treatment under “socialized medicine,” the ACA actually guarantees that insurance providers cannot use disabilities like Bella’s as an excuse to deny service, nor can they cap how much money is spent on an individual’s medical benefits. It also prevents insurers from denying or limiting benefits. Children of families that don’t have a million dollars would have a better chance of managing costs.

Wallace pointed out that Santorum didn’t give much to charity before Bella was born either. Given his continued opposition to health care reform, it seems Santorum favors a society where the rich can take care of their own and everyone else is left to struggle.

by on Mar. 4, 2012 at 10:26 AM
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Replies (1-10):
sweet-a-kins
by Ruby Member on Mar. 4, 2012 at 11:50 AM
So mr financial burden

What does someone that makes $70,000 a year do?

Hmmm?

President Obama gave more than Romney..hehe
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
bluerooffarm
by Silver Member on Mar. 4, 2012 at 2:59 PM
4 moms liked this

 Listen, I don't think he'll ever actually come out and concede these points.  Iknow he talks about his hardships, but he's busy serving 2 masters.

The Catholic Church is against the death penalty, but not Santorum.

The Catholic Church was against the war in Iraq, but not Santorum.

The Catholic Church believes that everyone deserves adequate healthcare regardless of their ability to pay for it, but not Santorum.

He only follows his religion's teaching so far as it coincides with his homophobic, misogynistic, bigotted view of the world.

I don't hold out much hope for him "seeing the light" about healthcare.  The system we have has too many lucrative backers, and money is his other god.

Sorry if that's offensive, but I'm callin it as I see it.

bluerooffarm
by Silver Member on Mar. 4, 2012 at 3:06 PM
1 mom liked this

 Just in case you all think I just pulled these positions outta my bum.  Here are the views of the church on these topics:

John Paul II on the War in Iraq

In 1991, Pope John Paul II opposed the Gulf War and publicly appealed to U.S. President George H.W. Bush not to wage it. In 2003, he once again opposed a war in Iraq and appealed to U.S. President George W. Bush to refrain from going to war.

In an Address to the Diplomatic Corps at the Vatican on January 13, 2003, the Pope declared that “War is never just another means that one can choose to employ for settling differences between nations” and reiterated that “war cannot be decided upon . . . except as the very last option and in accordance with very strict conditions.”

Two months later, on March 16, 2003, in his Angelus Message, Pope John Paul spoke of the need “to work with responsibility for peace” and declared that all options had not been exhausted: “There is still time to negotiate; there is still room for peace, it is never too late to come to an understanding and to continue discussions.” The war began two days later, on March 18, 2003.

Pope John Paul did not drop his opposition to the war once it had started. On June 4, 2004, in an Address to President Bush (who was visiting him at the Vatican), the Pope reminded the President that:

"You are very familiar with the unequivocal position of the Holy See in this regard, expressed in numerous documents, through direct and indirect contacts, and in the many diplomatic efforts which have been made since you visited me, first at Castelgandolfo on 23 July 2001, and again in this Apostolic Palace on 28 May 2002."

Benedict XVI on the War in Iraq

Since being elected pope, Pope Benedict XVI has largely confined his remarks on Iraq to prayers for peace, though he has occasionally been critical of the conduct of the war. In the April 2003 issue of 30 Days, an Italian Catholic magazine, the future pope (then Joseph Cardinal Ratzinger) made his opposition to the war known, while supporting Pope John Paul’s assessment of the justice of the war. He declared Pope John Paul’s position on the war to be “the thoughts of a man of conscience occupying the highest functions in the Catholic Church” and “the appeal of a conscience enlightened by the faith.”

 

Bishop William Murphy, head of the Diocese of Rockville Centre, New York, and chair of the U. S. Bishops' Committee on Domestic Justice and Human Development, gave the essence of the church's position in a letter to members of Congress, dated July 17, an excerpt of which was cited in an editorial in the National Catholic Reporter, "The right to health care" (9/18/09):

"Reform efforts must begin with the principle that decent health care is not a privilege, but a right and a requirement to protect the life and dignity of every person. ... The bishops' conference believes health care reform should be truly universal and it should be genuinely affordable" (italics in original).

The teaching that health care is a right rather than a privilege was articulated by Pope John XXIII in his encyclical, Pacem in Terris (Peace on Earth), published less than two months before his death on June 3, 1963.

 

The Pope's Statement


While the vast majority of U.S. Catholics support capital punishment, Pope John Paul II has declared the Church's near total opposition to the death penalty. In his encyclical "Evangelium Vitae" (The Gospel of Life) issued March 25, 1995 after four years of consultations with the world's Roman Catholic bishops, John Paul II wrote that execution is only appropriate "in cases of absolute necessity, in other words, when it would not be possible otherwise to defend society. Today, however, as a result of steady immprovement in the organization of the penal system, such cases are very rare, if not practically nonexistent." Until this encyclical, the death penalty was viewed as sometimes permissible as a means of protecting society. The universal catechism--book of rules--for Catholics had affirmed the right of the state to punish criminals with appropriate penalties "not excluding in cases of extreme gravity, the death penalty."

Kate_Momof3
by Platinum Member on Mar. 4, 2012 at 3:37 PM
4 moms liked this

 There are a few self-proclaimed Catholics on this site that are about as committed to their faith as Santorum.

I'd argue that he's also a narcissist and just loves the attention. It also goes hand in hand with his misogyny.

Quoting bluerooffarm:

 Listen, I don't think he'll ever actually come out and concede these points.  Iknow he talks about his hardships, but he's busy serving 2 masters.

The Catholic Church is against the death penalty, but not Santorum.

The Catholic Church was against the war in Iraq, but not Santorum.

The Catholic Church believes that everyone deserves adequate healthcare regardless of their ability to pay for it, but not Santorum.

He only follows his religion's teaching so far as it coincides with his homophobic, misogynistic, bigotted view of the world.

I don't hold out much hope for him "seeing the light" about healthcare.  The system we have has too many lucrative backers, and money is his other god.

Sorry if that's offensive, but I'm callin it as I see it.

 

kschlag
by on Mar. 4, 2012 at 4:46 PM
1 mom liked this

Once again, Pema Japa has found a gold nugget of truth! And a perfect example of why families with lower incomes might just need birth control!  You got to be able to take care of the children you have before making more!

Carpy
by Ruby Member on Mar. 4, 2012 at 5:06 PM
3 moms liked this

Just because he sees a need to help families that have a disabled child does not mean he agrees the with the monstrocity call Obamacare.  I see the need as well and in many cases medicaid and SSI already do help such families.

Mamawto4
by Bronze Member on Mar. 4, 2012 at 5:53 PM
3 moms liked this

Santorum and pretty much the majority of Americans, know that the health care system we have now is not working.  However that in no way means he believes Obamacare is the answer.

Meadowchik
by Gold Member on Mar. 4, 2012 at 6:02 PM
3 moms liked this

"By admitting that the health care system has created a financial burden for families, Santorum is essentially conceding the need for the Affordable Care Act."

No, such an admission is not conceding the need for it.  What pathetic "logic" and pathetic writing.

Friday
by Platinum Member on Mar. 4, 2012 at 7:15 PM


Quoting sweet-a-kins:

So mr financial burden

What does someone that makes $70,000 a year do?

Hmmm?

President Obama gave more than Romney..hehe

Or someone who makes $30,000? They are supposed to pull themselves up and deal or die, not his problem. What a putz. Interesting, from the article it seems he doesn't even tithe, tsk, tsk.


matreshka
by on Mar. 4, 2012 at 7:32 PM

He can't follow through the logic of what is going on in his family to what is going on in families all over America.  All children should have the health coverage they need to get a good heathy start in life.  If it wasn't for "RomneyCare" my children would not get the specialists they go to covered even though my DH gets health insurance through work, we have had to have supplimental MassHealth for my sons.

Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)