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Obama Broke Campaign Promise, Legalized Horse Slaughter

Posted by on Apr. 19, 2012 at 4:26 AM
  • 73 Replies
1 mom liked this

http://technorati.com/lifestyle/article/obama-legalizes-horse-slaughter-for-human/

Horse slaughter plants are legal again in the United States. Restrictions on horse meat processing for human consumption have been lifted.  courtesy of Google Images

In a bipartisan effort, the House of Representatives and the United States Senate approved the Conference Committee report on spending bill H2112, which among other things, funds the United States Department of Agriculture.  On November 18th, as the country was celebrating Thanksgiving, President Obama signed a law, allowing Americans to kill and eat horses. Essentially, one turkey was pardoned in the presence of worldwide media while in the shadows, buried under pages of fiscal regulation, millions of horses were sentenced to death.

Horse slaughter has been prohibited in the United States as funding for inspections of horses in transit and at slaughter houses was non-existent. This worked because the horse meat cannot be sold for human consumption without such inspections. The House version of the bill retained the de-funding language and the Senate version did not. The conference committee charged with reconciling the two opted to not include it. The result is that it is now legal to slaughter horses for humans to eat.

Notwithstanding that 70% of Americans oppose horse slaughter, that President Obama made a campaign promise to permanently ban horse slaughter and exports of horses for human consumption (horses can be sent to Mexico and Canada), that documentation of animal cruelty, slaughterhouse stench, fluid runoff and negative community impact exists, it is taxpayers that will bear the costs!

Wyoming state representative Sue Wallis and her pro-slaughter group estimate that between 120,000 and 200,000 horses will be killed for human consumption per year and that Oregon, Idaho, Wyoming, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, Georgia and Missouri, are considering opening slaughter plants.

During these trying times, is the only thing that Democrats and Republicans can agree on is that Americans need to eat horses?


Ack, the irony is killing me...after HuffPo, Daily Kos, and David Axelrod inject themselves in the hallyballo over Romney's dog riding in a crate on the top of their car, and then the return fire about Obama eating dogmeat as a child in Indonesia!

THIS is actual policy, people, signed by President Obama, this is Obama betraying a campaign promise to ban horseslaughter.

"We have a moral responsibility to not spend more than we take in." -Mitt Romney 2012

Visit Mitt Romney for President, CafeMom Group

by on Apr. 19, 2012 at 4:26 AM
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Replies (1-10):
_Kissy_
by on Apr. 19, 2012 at 6:10 AM

Updated 12/1/2011 11:50 AM

WASHINGTON -- Congress has lifted a de facto ban on the slaughter of horses, a move hailed by Missouri farmers and state political leaders who say the prohibition had inadvertently caused more harm to the animals than good.

  • Cheri White Owl, founder of Horse Feathers Equine Rescue, is pictured with one of the 33 horses she is currently caring for, in Guthrie, Okla.

    Sue Ogrocki, AP

    Cheri White Owl, founder of Horse Feathers Equine Rescue, is pictured with one of the 33 horses she is currently caring for, in Guthrie, Okla.

Sue Ogrocki, AP

Cheri White Owl, founder of Horse Feathers Equine Rescue, is pictured with one of the 33 horses she is currently caring for, in Guthrie, Okla.



But some animal-rights activists decried the little-noticed provision, which sailed to passage earlier this month and was signed into law by President Barack Obama on Nov. 18. And they vowed to keep the issue alive, pressing for an outright prohibition of horse slaughtering in the U.S.

At issue is a ban, first enacted in 2006, that prevented the U.S. Department of Agriculture from using federal funds to inspect any meat processing plants that slaughter horses. Plants that are not inspected by theUSDA cannot ship meat across state lines, so the provision effectively ended domestic horse slaughter.

There is no U.S. market for the human consumption of horse meat. But it is seen as a delicacy overseas, especially in some European and Asian countries. In addition, horse meat has been used in the U.S. to feed zoo animals, because it's a good source of protein.

Farmers and some policymakers say the ban resulted in old horses being abandoned and neglected. In response, Sen. Max Baucus, D-Mont., successfully pushed for a provision requiring the non-partisanGovernment Accountability Office to study the impact of the ban. The GAO study, released in June, highlighted the concerns of Baucus and others.

The GAO report concluded that the slaughter of American horses didn't stop because of the ban, but simply shifted to Mexico and Canada. "From 2006 through 2010, U.S. horse exports for slaughter increased by 148 and 660 percent to Canada and Mexico, respectively," the GAO report states. "As a result, nearly the same number of U.S. horses was transported to Canada and Mexico for slaughter in 2010 -- nearly 138,000 -- as was slaughtered before domestic slaughter ceased."

In addition, horse prices declined for those animals most likely to be bought for slaughter, the report concluded. The GAO said that comprehensive data was not available on abandonment and neglect, but that state and local governments, along with some animal welfare groups, reported an increase in investigations of such incidents since 2007. "State, local, tribal, and horse industry officials generally attributed these increases in neglect and abandonments to cessation of domestic slaughter and the economic downturn," the GAO stated.

The agency suggested that Congress should either reconsider restrictions on the use of federal funds to inspect horse slaughtering facilities or consider a permanent ban of horse slaughtering. Animal-rights groups have long pressed for the latter option -- and they hope they now have their opening.

Wayne Pacelle, president and CEO of the Humane Society of the United States, said he thinks that if horse slaughter plants reopen in the U.S. that will provide "juice" to the society's effort to pass a ban on the practice.

He said he agreed with GAO's conclusion that the federal USDA ban has not stopped horse slaughtering. But he questioned the contention that it has led to more abandonment or neglect of horses.

"It's largely fabrication," Pacelle said. He said that if about the same number of horses are being exported to Canada and Mexico for slaughter as were killed in the U.S. before the ban, it doesn't add up that there is also a spike in abandonment.

The lawmakers who have embraced the GAO study are "slaughter proponents," he charged. "And that they are crying crocodile tears over abandonment is essentially a cynical and hypocritical line of argument. And it's a little too convenient."

But for critics of the USDA ban, the GAO study provided the evidence they needed to move forward with repeal.

As the 2012 agriculture appropriations bill moved through Congress this year, Rep. Jack Kingston, R-Georgia, moved to strip out the USDA funding ban. A spokesman for Kingston, who is chairman of the House agriculture spending subcommittee, said the provision was ineffective in stopping slaughter, but it did kill jobs.

"It's a $65 million industry in America -- it was before it was banned," said Chris Crawford, Kingston's spokesman.

The Humane Society and other groups say they think the repeal will prompt renewed interest in the American Horse Slaughter Prevention Act of 2011, which would ban the interstate transport and live export of horses for slaughter for human consumption. The bill was introduced earlier this year by Sens. Mary Landrieu, D-La., and Lindsey Graham, R-S.C. There is companion legislation in the House.

The measure has been introduced in previous sessions, but could pass this time, Pacelle said, if there's fresh evidence of horse slaughter in the U.S.

"I think what will happen now is we will see cosponsoring of both bills accelerate as there's more talk of opening slaughter houses in the United States," he said.

Meadowchik
by Gold Member on Apr. 19, 2012 at 6:23 AM
1 mom liked this

In other words, Obama didn't ban horse slaughter as promised, and hasn't demonstrated any leadership in moving the process forward, either.  On the contrary Obama signed a bill making horse slaughter in the USA possible.

Quoting _Kissy_:


WASHINGTON -- Congress has lifted a de facto ban on the slaughter of horses, a move hailed by Missouri farmers and state political leaders who say the prohibition had inadvertently caused more harm to the animals than good.

  • Cheri White Owl, founder of Horse Feathers Equine Rescue, is pictured with one of the 33 horses she is currently caring for, in Guthrie, Okla.

    Sue Ogrocki, AP

    Cheri White Owl, founder of Horse Feathers Equine Rescue, is pictured with one of the 33 horses she is currently caring for, in Guthrie, Okla.

Sue Ogrocki, AP

Cheri White Owl, founder of Horse Feathers Equine Rescue, is pictured with one of the 33 horses she is currently caring for, in Guthrie, Okla.



But some animal-rights activists decried the little-noticed provision, which sailed to passage earlier this month and was signed into law by President Barack Obama on Nov. 18. And they vowed to keep the issue alive, pressing for an outright prohibition of horse slaughtering in the U.S.

At issue is a ban, first enacted in 2006, that prevented the U.S. Department of Agriculture from using federal funds to inspect any meat processing plants that slaughter horses. Plants that are not inspected by theUSDA cannot ship meat across state lines, so the provision effectively ended domestic horse slaughter.

There is no U.S. market for the human consumption of horse meat. But it is seen as a delicacy overseas, especially in some European and Asian countries. In addition, horse meat has been used in the U.S. to feed zoo animals, because it's a good source of protein.

Farmers and some policymakers say the ban resulted in old horses being abandoned and neglected. In response, Sen. Max Baucus, D-Mont., successfully pushed for a provision requiring the non-partisanGovernment Accountability Office to study the impact of the ban. The GAO study, released in June, highlighted the concerns of Baucus and others.

The GAO report concluded that the slaughter of American horses didn't stop because of the ban, but simply shifted to Mexico and Canada. "From 2006 through 2010, U.S. horse exports for slaughter increased by 148 and 660 percent to Canada and Mexico, respectively," the GAO report states. "As a result, nearly the same number of U.S. horses was transported to Canada and Mexico for slaughter in 2010 -- nearly 138,000 -- as was slaughtered before domestic slaughter ceased."

In addition, horse prices declined for those animals most likely to be bought for slaughter, the report concluded. The GAO said that comprehensive data was not available on abandonment and neglect, but that state and local governments, along with some animal welfare groups, reported an increase in investigations of such incidents since 2007. "State, local, tribal, and horse industry officials generally attributed these increases in neglect and abandonments to cessation of domestic slaughter and the economic downturn," the GAO stated.

The agency suggested that Congress should either reconsider restrictions on the use of federal funds to inspect horse slaughtering facilities or consider a permanent ban of horse slaughtering. Animal-rights groups have long pressed for the latter option -- and they hope they now have their opening.

Wayne Pacelle, president and CEO of the Humane Society of the United States, said he thinks that if horse slaughter plants reopen in the U.S. that will provide "juice" to the society's effort to pass a ban on the practice.

He said he agreed with GAO's conclusion that the federal USDA ban has not stopped horse slaughtering. But he questioned the contention that it has led to more abandonment or neglect of horses.

"It's largely fabrication," Pacelle said. He said that if about the same number of horses are being exported to Canada and Mexico for slaughter as were killed in the U.S. before the ban, it doesn't add up that there is also a spike in abandonment.

The lawmakers who have embraced the GAO study are "slaughter proponents," he charged. "And that they are crying crocodile tears over abandonment is essentially a cynical and hypocritical line of argument. And it's a little too convenient."

But for critics of the USDA ban, the GAO study provided the evidence they needed to move forward with repeal.

As the 2012 agriculture appropriations bill moved through Congress this year, Rep. Jack Kingston, R-Georgia, moved to strip out the USDA funding ban. A spokesman for Kingston, who is chairman of the House agriculture spending subcommittee, said the provision was ineffective in stopping slaughter, but it did kill jobs.

"It's a $65 million industry in America -- it was before it was banned," said Chris Crawford, Kingston's spokesman.

The Humane Society and other groups say they think the repeal will prompt renewed interest in the American Horse Slaughter Prevention Act of 2011, which would ban the interstate transport and live export of horses for slaughter for human consumption. The bill was introduced earlier this year by Sens. Mary Landrieu, D-La., and Lindsey Graham, R-S.C. There is companion legislation in the House.

The measure has been introduced in previous sessions, but could pass this time, Pacelle said, if there's fresh evidence of horse slaughter in the U.S.

"I think what will happen now is we will see cosponsoring of both bills accelerate as there's more talk of opening slaughter houses in the United States," he said.


"We have a moral responsibility to not spend more than we take in." -Mitt Romney 2012

Visit Mitt Romney for President, CafeMom Group

Sweet_Faith
by Gold Member on Apr. 19, 2012 at 6:25 AM
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Posted on CafeMom Mobile
_Kissy_
by on Apr. 19, 2012 at 6:27 AM
1 mom liked this

meat is meat....I personally dont touch any kind of meat. But its here for our consumption

Meadowchik
by Gold Member on Apr. 19, 2012 at 6:39 AM
1 mom liked this


Quoting _Kissy_:

meat is meat....I personally dont touch any kind of meat. But its here for our consumption

That's beside the point.  Obama made a promise to people who care deeply about human treatment of horses, and he broke it.

"We have a moral responsibility to not spend more than we take in." -Mitt Romney 2012

Visit Mitt Romney for President, CafeMom Group

imamomzilla
by on Apr. 19, 2012 at 8:01 AM
2 moms liked this

 sad

Is Fido next...?

Carpy
by Platinum Member on Apr. 19, 2012 at 8:07 AM
4 moms liked this

Horse meat is turned into dog food.  A healthy dog is a tasty dog.

imamomzilla
by on Apr. 19, 2012 at 8:16 AM
1 mom liked this

 Ew. LOL

Quoting Carpy:

Horse meat is turned into dog food.  A healthy dog is a tasty dog.

 

Mamawto4
by Bronze Member on Apr. 19, 2012 at 8:26 AM
2 moms liked this

If I were a strategist for Romney, I'd have Ann, being an equestrian, all over this.

denise3680
by Gold Member on Apr. 19, 2012 at 9:18 AM
2 moms liked this

 People eat horses just like they eat dogs, cats, squirrels, rabbits, cows, pigs etc.....  they are here for our consumption.  If you do not like it, then do not eat it.  Its funny how this is all Obamas fault but this bill passed both houses:/  It is not like they are going to be running around and killing horse willy nilly.  Wht is the problem anyways? Is thiis really a big issue or is it just another thing for some to find fault with Obama?

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