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News & Politics News & Politics

I know no one cares, and he's irrelevant...

CafeMom Tickers
by on Apr. 30, 2012 at 10:36 AM
Replies (21-30):
shadenn766
by on Apr. 30, 2012 at 1:33 PM

 lol...i swear nba stuff would be way more important than ronny paul

Quoting asfriend:

In related news -

The Miami Heat defeated the New York Knicks  100 to 67 in their first round NBA playoff game. After the game a young ball boy came out to the court and made 200 baskets.

Look for this ball boy to make it to the NBA finals.

 

shadenn766
by on Apr. 30, 2012 at 1:35 PM

 sidesplittinglaughter

Quoting rachelrothchild:

He's not a ball boy.  He's been in Congress for over 20 years.  Someone who keeps getting elected over and over again has no chance?

Quoting asfriend:

In related news -

The Miami Heat defeated the New York Knicks  100 to 67 in their first round NBA playoff game. After the game a young ball boy came out to the court and made 200 baskets.

Look for this ball boy to make it to the NBA finals.


 

asfriend
by on Apr. 30, 2012 at 1:36 PM
1 mom liked this

See, yeah, that's what I thought! 

Quoting shadenn766:

 lol...i swear this is way more important than ronny paul

Quoting asfriend:

In related news -

The Miami Heat defeated the New York Knicks  100 to 67 in their first round NBA playoff game. After the game a young ball boy came out to the court and made 200 baskets.

Look for this ball boy to make it to the NBA finals.

 


-Eilish-
by Johnson 2012 on Apr. 30, 2012 at 1:37 PM
1 mom liked this


Quoting mom2myprince:

Please give it up. RON PAUL is done.

Obviously not!

Last Man Standing

Writes The American Spectator’s James Antle:

What is Ron Paul doing?..

Last weekend, (Paul supporters) won at the Louisiana caucuses even though Paul managed just 6 percent of the vote in the state’s primary earlier this year. The Paulites carried the 1st, 2nd, 5th, and 6th congressional districts. According to one count, 74 percent of the delegates elected to the state convention Saturday were Paul supporters…

That same day, Ron Paul supporters were elected chairman and vice chairman of the Alaska Republican Party. Paul finished third in the popular vote in Alaska’s caucuses, but his supporters joined with former Tea Party Senate candidate Joe Miller to dominate the state convention. According to Politico, “It’s more evidence of the political maturation of the Paul forces, who are beginning to seize the levers of powers from within state parties.”

In Minnesota, Paul came in second in the popular vote in the caucuses, ahead of Romney but behind Santorum. Yet this month he swept 20 of the 24 delegates available at the Minnesota congressional district conventions.

Then in Iowa, at least six of the new state Republican central committee members are public Paul supporters. The Des Moines Register describes two others as having “close ties,” reporting, “A rising tide of Republicans who share Ron Paul’s philosophy of limited government are flooding into GOP party roles in Iowa.” A.J. Spiker, the state party chairman, was a former vice chairman of Paul’s Iowa campaign.

The Ron Paul Republicans’ mission is twofold. First, they want to secure enough delegates to the Republican National Convention to place Paul’s name in nomination. The International Business Timesreports, “Washington is now the third state, after Iowa and Minnesota, in which Ron Paul has locked up at least half of the state’s nominating delegates.” North Dakota and Maine could join them.

Some hope this will give them a longshot chance of winning, citing Warren G. Harding’s nomination in 1920. More likely, it gives Paul some leverage at the convention to negotiate for certain platform planks, a promiment speaking slot, or perhaps even have some say over the vice presidential pick.

The second objective is to integrate themselves into party leadership positions like the Christian right did before them. While Paul’s supporters are so far a smaller voting bloc than the social conservatives who backed Pat Robertson’s presidential campaign in 1988, Paul’s crowds on the stump are still huge: over 3,000 turned out to see Paul in Houston, 6,000 in Austin, more than 4,000 in the rain in Philadelphia.

Could Santorum or Gingrich regularly draw such big, young crowds after their chances to win the nomination dwindled? Could Romney do so now?

Paul will also be the last man standing against Romney in some large remaining primaries. He will hope to replicate — or perhaps even improve upon — the 40 percent of the vote he got in Virginia when he and Romney were the only Republican presidential candidates on the ballot…

Many other Republicans are demoralized. The near-certain nominee doesn’t excite them. There are fewer high-profile Tea Party primaries than two years ago. The other conservative presidential candidates have been beaten.

Ron Paul’s supporters remain. They are still trying to win delegates and reshape the Republican Party.

quotes Eilish likes


“The Christian ideal has not been tried and found wanting; it has been found difficult and left untried.”


G.K. Chesterton

-Eilish-
by Johnson 2012 on Apr. 30, 2012 at 1:40 PM
1 mom liked this

And thank God! The MSM lies through their teeth.

Quoting asfriend:

You all realize that is not a news report right? That is a video made by a Ron Paul cheerleader, he is setting you all up for a tremendous fall.

Or he is really an Obama supporter, who wants you to be disillusioned when Paul has the inevitable failure?

.


mom2myprince
by on Apr. 30, 2012 at 2:22 PM


Quoting -Eilish-:


Quoting mom2myprince:

Please give it up. RON PAUL is done.

Obviously not!


Last Man Standing

Writes The American Spectator’s James Antle:

What is Ron Paul doing?..

Last weekend, (Paul supporters) won at the Louisiana caucuses even though Paul managed just 6 percent of the vote in the state’s primary earlier this year. The Paulites carried the 1st, 2nd, 5th, and 6th congressional districts. According to one count, 74 percent of the delegates elected to the state convention Saturday were Paul supporters…

That same day, Ron Paul supporters were elected chairman and vice chairman of the Alaska Republican Party. Paul finished third in the popular vote in Alaska’s caucuses, but his supporters joined with former Tea Party Senate candidate Joe Miller to dominate the state convention. According to Politico, “It’s more evidence of the political maturation of the Paul forces, who are beginning to seize the levers of powers from within state parties.”

In Minnesota, Paul came in second in the popular vote in the caucuses, ahead of Romney but behind Santorum. Yet this month he swept 20 of the 24 delegates available at the Minnesota congressional district conventions.

Then in Iowa, at least six of the new state Republican central committee members are public Paul supporters. The Des Moines Register describes two others as having “close ties,” reporting, “A rising tide of Republicans who share Ron Paul’s philosophy of limited government are flooding into GOP party roles in Iowa.” A.J. Spiker, the state party chairman, was a former vice chairman of Paul’s Iowa campaign.

The Ron Paul Republicans’ mission is twofold. First, they want to secure enough delegates to the Republican National Convention to place Paul’s name in nomination. The International Business Timesreports, “Washington is now the third state, after Iowa and Minnesota, in which Ron Paul has locked up at least half of the state’s nominating delegates.” North Dakota and Maine could join them.

Some hope this will give them a longshot chance of winning, citing Warren G. Harding’s nomination in 1920. More likely, it gives Paul some leverage at the convention to negotiate for certain platform planks, a promiment speaking slot, or perhaps even have some say over the vice presidential pick.

The second objective is to integrate themselves into party leadership positions like the Christian right did before them. While Paul’s supporters are so far a smaller voting bloc than the social conservatives who backed Pat Robertson’s presidential campaign in 1988, Paul’s crowds on the stump are still huge: over 3,000 turned out to see Paul in Houston, 6,000 in Austin, more than 4,000 in the rain in Philadelphia.

Could Santorum or Gingrich regularly draw such big, young crowds after their chances to win the nomination dwindled? Could Romney do so now?

Paul will also be the last man standing against Romney in some large remaining primaries. He will hope to replicate — or perhaps even improve upon — the 40 percent of the vote he got in Virginia when he and Romney were the only Republican presidential candidates on the ballot…

Many other Republicans are demoralized. The near-certain nominee doesn’t excite them. There are fewer high-profile Tea Party primaries than two years ago. The other conservative presidential candidates have been beaten.

Ron Paul’s supporters remain. They are still trying to win delegates and reshape the Republican Party.

Do you know how many delegates he needs he has 80. romney has 847 

1144 to win

Ron pauls out.

-Eilish-
by Johnson 2012 on Apr. 30, 2012 at 2:28 PM
4 moms liked this


Quoting mom2myprince:


Quoting -Eilish-:


Quoting mom2myprince:

Please give it up. RON PAUL is done.

Obviously not!


Last Man Standing

Writes The American Spectator’s James Antle:

What is Ron Paul doing?..

Last weekend, (Paul supporters) won at the Louisiana caucuses even though Paul managed just 6 percent of the vote in the state’s primary earlier this year. The Paulites carried the 1st, 2nd, 5th, and 6th congressional districts. According to one count, 74 percent of the delegates elected to the state convention Saturday were Paul supporters…

That same day, Ron Paul supporters were elected chairman and vice chairman of the Alaska Republican Party. Paul finished third in the popular vote in Alaska’s caucuses, but his supporters joined with former Tea Party Senate candidate Joe Miller to dominate the state convention. According to Politico, “It’s more evidence of the political maturation of the Paul forces, who are beginning to seize the levers of powers from within state parties.”

In Minnesota, Paul came in second in the popular vote in the caucuses, ahead of Romney but behind Santorum. Yet this month he swept 20 of the 24 delegates available at the Minnesota congressional district conventions.

Then in Iowa, at least six of the new state Republican central committee members are public Paul supporters. The Des Moines Register describes two others as having “close ties,” reporting, “A rising tide of Republicans who share Ron Paul’s philosophy of limited government are flooding into GOP party roles in Iowa.” A.J. Spiker, the state party chairman, was a former vice chairman of Paul’s Iowa campaign.

The Ron Paul Republicans’ mission is twofold. First, they want to secure enough delegates to the Republican National Convention to place Paul’s name in nomination. The International Business Timesreports, “Washington is now the third state, after Iowa and Minnesota, in which Ron Paul has locked up at least half of the state’s nominating delegates.” North Dakota and Maine could join them.

Some hope this will give them a longshot chance of winning, citing Warren G. Harding’s nomination in 1920. More likely, it gives Paul some leverage at the convention to negotiate for certain platform planks, a promiment speaking slot, or perhaps even have some say over the vice presidential pick.

The second objective is to integrate themselves into party leadership positions like the Christian right did before them. While Paul’s supporters are so far a smaller voting bloc than the social conservatives who backed Pat Robertson’s presidential campaign in 1988, Paul’s crowds on the stump are still huge: over 3,000 turned out to see Paul in Houston, 6,000 in Austin, more than 4,000 in the rain in Philadelphia.

Could Santorum or Gingrich regularly draw such big, young crowds after their chances to win the nomination dwindled? Could Romney do so now?

Paul will also be the last man standing against Romney in some large remaining primaries. He will hope to replicate — or perhaps even improve upon — the 40 percent of the vote he got in Virginia when he and Romney were the only Republican presidential candidates on the ballot…

Many other Republicans are demoralized. The near-certain nominee doesn’t excite them. There are fewer high-profile Tea Party primaries than two years ago. The other conservative presidential candidates have been beaten.

Ron Paul’s supporters remain. They are still trying to win delegates and reshape the Republican Party.

Do you know how many delegates he needs he has 80. romney has 847 

1144 to win

Ron pauls out.

You clearly don't understand the process. In about half the states, the delegates are NOT legally bound to vote for the candidate who won the popular vote. Paul has MORE than 80, because he's been winning delegates in these unbound states. In bound states Ron Paul supporters are being named as delegates for Romney. The only thing Paul needs to do is ensure that Romney doesn't get 1144 from the bound states before the Convention. That will push a brokered convention. At a brokered convention, all bound delegates are released from their legal obligation to vote according the popular vote. And since Ron Paul supporters are in many Romney slots, chances are fairly likely that Ron Paul would win a brokered convention.

quotes Eilish likes


“The Christian ideal has not been tried and found wanting; it has been found difficult and left untried.”


G.K. Chesterton

Sisteract
by Socialist Hippie on Apr. 30, 2012 at 2:30 PM
5 moms liked this

I'd vote for Paul over Romney ANY day-

GOP is so out of touch-

asfriend
by on Apr. 30, 2012 at 2:42 PM

That sounds remarkably like, trying to steal an election.

But it is not realistic.

Quoting -Eilish-:


Quoting mom2myprince:


Quoting -Eilish-:


Quoting mom2myprince:

Please give it up. RON PAUL is done.

Obviously not!


Last Man Standing

Writes The American Spectator’s James Antle:

What is Ron Paul doing?..

Last weekend, (Paul supporters) won at the Louisiana caucuses even though Paul managed just 6 percent of the vote in the state’s primary earlier this year. The Paulites carried the 1st, 2nd, 5th, and 6th congressional districts. According to one count, 74 percent of the delegates elected to the state convention Saturday were Paul supporters…

That same day, Ron Paul supporters were elected chairman and vice chairman of the Alaska Republican Party. Paul finished third in the popular vote in Alaska’s caucuses, but his supporters joined with former Tea Party Senate candidate Joe Miller to dominate the state convention. According to Politico, “It’s more evidence of the political maturation of the Paul forces, who are beginning to seize the levers of powers from within state parties.”

In Minnesota, Paul came in second in the popular vote in the caucuses, ahead of Romney but behind Santorum. Yet this month he swept 20 of the 24 delegates available at the Minnesota congressional district conventions.

Then in Iowa, at least six of the new state Republican central committee members are public Paul supporters. The Des Moines Register describes two others as having “close ties,” reporting, “A rising tide of Republicans who share Ron Paul’s philosophy of limited government are flooding into GOP party roles in Iowa.” A.J. Spiker, the state party chairman, was a former vice chairman of Paul’s Iowa campaign.

The Ron Paul Republicans’ mission is twofold. First, they want to secure enough delegates to the Republican National Convention to place Paul’s name in nomination. The International Business Timesreports, “Washington is now the third state, after Iowa and Minnesota, in which Ron Paul has locked up at least half of the state’s nominating delegates.” North Dakota and Maine could join them.

Some hope this will give them a longshot chance of winning, citing Warren G. Harding’s nomination in 1920. More likely, it gives Paul some leverage at the convention to negotiate for certain platform planks, a promiment speaking slot, or perhaps even have some say over the vice presidential pick.

The second objective is to integrate themselves into party leadership positions like the Christian right did before them. While Paul’s supporters are so far a smaller voting bloc than the social conservatives who backed Pat Robertson’s presidential campaign in 1988, Paul’s crowds on the stump are still huge: over 3,000 turned out to see Paul in Houston, 6,000 in Austin, more than 4,000 in the rain in Philadelphia.

Could Santorum or Gingrich regularly draw such big, young crowds after their chances to win the nomination dwindled? Could Romney do so now?

Paul will also be the last man standing against Romney in some large remaining primaries. He will hope to replicate — or perhaps even improve upon — the 40 percent of the vote he got in Virginia when he and Romney were the only Republican presidential candidates on the ballot…

Many other Republicans are demoralized. The near-certain nominee doesn’t excite them. There are fewer high-profile Tea Party primaries than two years ago. The other conservative presidential candidates have been beaten.

Ron Paul’s supporters remain. They are still trying to win delegates and reshape the Republican Party.

Do you know how many delegates he needs he has 80. romney has 847 

1144 to win

Ron pauls out.

You clearly don't understand the process. In about half the states, the delegates are NOT legally bound to vote for the candidate who won the popular vote. Paul has MORE than 80, because he's been winning delegates in these unbound states. In bound states Ron Paul supporters are being named as delegates for Romney. The only thing Paul needs to do is ensure that Romney doesn't get 1144 from the bound states before the Convention. That will push a brokered convention. At a brokered convention, all bound delegates are released from their legal obligation to vote according the popular vote. And since Ron Paul supporters are in many Romney slots, chances are fairly likely that Ron Paul would win a brokered convention.


mom2myprince
by on Apr. 30, 2012 at 2:45 PM


Quoting -Eilish-:


Quoting mom2myprince:


Quoting -Eilish-:


Quoting mom2myprince:

Please give it up. RON PAUL is done.

Obviously not!


Last Man Standing

Writes The American Spectator’s James Antle:

What is Ron Paul doing?..

Last weekend, (Paul supporters) won at the Louisiana caucuses even though Paul managed just 6 percent of the vote in the state’s primary earlier this year. The Paulites carried the 1st, 2nd, 5th, and 6th congressional districts. According to one count, 74 percent of the delegates elected to the state convention Saturday were Paul supporters…

That same day, Ron Paul supporters were elected chairman and vice chairman of the Alaska Republican Party. Paul finished third in the popular vote in Alaska’s caucuses, but his supporters joined with former Tea Party Senate candidate Joe Miller to dominate the state convention. According to Politico, “It’s more evidence of the political maturation of the Paul forces, who are beginning to seize the levers of powers from within state parties.”

In Minnesota, Paul came in second in the popular vote in the caucuses, ahead of Romney but behind Santorum. Yet this month he swept 20 of the 24 delegates available at the Minnesota congressional district conventions.

Then in Iowa, at least six of the new state Republican central committee members are public Paul supporters. The Des Moines Register describes two others as having “close ties,” reporting, “A rising tide of Republicans who share Ron Paul’s philosophy of limited government are flooding into GOP party roles in Iowa.” A.J. Spiker, the state party chairman, was a former vice chairman of Paul’s Iowa campaign.

The Ron Paul Republicans’ mission is twofold. First, they want to secure enough delegates to the Republican National Convention to place Paul’s name in nomination. The International Business Timesreports, “Washington is now the third state, after Iowa and Minnesota, in which Ron Paul has locked up at least half of the state’s nominating delegates.” North Dakota and Maine could join them.

Some hope this will give them a longshot chance of winning, citing Warren G. Harding’s nomination in 1920. More likely, it gives Paul some leverage at the convention to negotiate for certain platform planks, a promiment speaking slot, or perhaps even have some say over the vice presidential pick.

The second objective is to integrate themselves into party leadership positions like the Christian right did before them. While Paul’s supporters are so far a smaller voting bloc than the social conservatives who backed Pat Robertson’s presidential campaign in 1988, Paul’s crowds on the stump are still huge: over 3,000 turned out to see Paul in Houston, 6,000 in Austin, more than 4,000 in the rain in Philadelphia.

Could Santorum or Gingrich regularly draw such big, young crowds after their chances to win the nomination dwindled? Could Romney do so now?

Paul will also be the last man standing against Romney in some large remaining primaries. He will hope to replicate — or perhaps even improve upon — the 40 percent of the vote he got in Virginia when he and Romney were the only Republican presidential candidates on the ballot…

Many other Republicans are demoralized. The near-certain nominee doesn’t excite them. There are fewer high-profile Tea Party primaries than two years ago. The other conservative presidential candidates have been beaten.

Ron Paul’s supporters remain. They are still trying to win delegates and reshape the Republican Party.

Do you know how many delegates he needs he has 80. romney has 847 

1144 to win

Ron pauls out.

You clearly don't understand the process. In about half the states, the delegates are NOT legally bound to vote for the candidate who won the popular vote. Paul has MORE than 80, because he's been winning delegates in these unbound states. In bound states Ron Paul supporters are being named as delegates for Romney. The only thing Paul needs to do is ensure that Romney doesn't get 1144 from the bound states before the Convention. That will push a brokered convention. At a brokered convention, all bound delegates are released from their legal obligation to vote according the popular vote. And since Ron Paul supporters are in many Romney slots, chances are fairly likely that Ron Paul would win a brokered convention.

Are you mad he wont win he needs to drop out and go to a nursing home.

with out delegates he has nothing  80 or 100 it still wont help his in dead last you dont even here ron pauls name anymore because he is a joke.

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