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Obama begins campaign to an empty arena

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Obama Begins Campaign To Empty Arena

MAY 7, 2012 8:28 AM

What a difference from four years ago.

President Obama started his campaign on Saturday with rallies in Ohio and Virginia, but there were none of the ‘overflowing’ crowds that were expected. The Schottenstein Center in Ohio has a capacity of 18,300, but Obama’s rally left over 4,000 seats empty. Mark Landler of the New York Times said the rally “had the feeling of a concert by an aging rock star,” as the president said the campaign was “still about hope,” and “still about change.”

According to the estimates, about 14,000 supporters showed up in Ohio, while 8,000 turned out in Richmond.


Obama tried to stress the importance of his necessary return to the White House so he can improve an America “where everyone gets a fair shot.” He emphasized that Romney’s vision of America was built on “a credo of layoffs, outsourcing, tax avoidance and union busting.”

I don’t care about how many ways you try to explain it,” the president mocked, “Corporations aren’t people. People are people.”

Romney’s campaign spokeswoman, Andrea Saul, released a statement saying, “No matter how many lofty campaign speeches President Obama gives, the fact remains that American families are struggling on his watch: to pay their bills find a job and keep their homes.”

ABC reported one woman in attendance said, “I’m not satisfied with his four years, but I think he’s been fighting a do-nothing Congress and some bad public opinion.”

Romney looks to improve his perception.

Another is quoted as saying, “I want to support Obama’s goal of helping women, you know, with birth control. If Romney would get in, he would take us, especially the women, back to the 1930s or 50s.”

These statements hold no weight and tell this author the level of intellect of an average person at an Obama rally.

To start, the “do-nothing Congress” was controlled by Democrats until this year, so they have no one to blame but themselves for failed policies. And as for Romney taking women back to the ways of the 30s and 50s: that is just ignorant. Democrats have recently spun Republican policies and procedures to the so-called ‘War on Women,’ inciting Speaker of the House John Boehner to say that Obama was “picking a fight where one doesn’t exist.”

This election season will be very exciting, pitting a successful CEO and former governor against a popular, albeit unproven incumbent President. The Obama campaign will be attempting to portray Romney as a sleezy businessman, only concerned with personal gain, while Romney will be pointing directly to numbers produced by Obama over his presidency.

Make sure you know for whom you are voting and why. The next several years will prove to be extremely important for America’s economy.

SHARE this to let your friends know more about why Obama does NOT need to be re-elected.

by on May. 7, 2012 at 9:58 AM
Replies (11-20):
rocketracer
by Gold Member on May. 7, 2012 at 10:41 AM
2 moms liked this


Quoting cbk_mom3:

I heard it was because they ran out of his "special mixture" Kool-aide. Heard he had to get another dog before he could make more. ;-)


In the background I can hear the voice of Charlton Heston...."It's dogs!"  Soylent Green is made out of  dogs!" 

sweet-a-kins
by Ruby Member on May. 7, 2012 at 11:08 AM

 Link?

sweet-a-kins
by Ruby Member on May. 7, 2012 at 11:11 AM
1 mom liked this

 Obama Formally Kicks Off Campaign in Ohio and Virginia

Stephen Crowley/The New York Times

President Obama took the stage in Columbus on Saturday after being introduced by his wife.

By
Published: May 5, 2012
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COLUMBUS, Ohio - President Obama sought to rekindle the passion of his 2008 victory on Saturday with a pair of huge rallies in battleground states that signaled a new, more politically aggressive phase of the campaign and a sharpened critique of Mitt Romney.

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Stephen Crowley/The New York Times

President Obama on Saturday at Ohio State University, where he held one of two rallies kicking off his re-election campaign.

Mr. Obama, speaking to enthusiastic crowds here and in Richmond, Va., said the election offered voters a stark choice between an America "where everyone gets a fair shot" and the Republican vision offered by Mr. Romney, which he said was built on a credo of layoffs, outsourcing, tax avoidance and union busting.

Seeking to link Mr. Romney to Congressional Republicans, the president said the presumptive Republican nominee was their candidate and could be relied on to "rubber-stamp" their agenda, "if he gets the chance."

"Ohio, I tell you what," Mr. Obama said, his voice rising, "we cannot give him that chance." The crowd of 14,000 supporters erupted into cheers and chants of "Four more years!"

Hanging above him was a blue-and-white banner with the word "Forward" - a new slogan the president invoked as a reason to re-elect him and as a rebuke of Mr. Romney, who he said would drag the country back to what he called the failed policies that led to the 2008 financial crisis.

"Governor Romney is a patriotic American who has raised a wonderful family," Mr. Obama said, before painting the former Massachusetts governor as an out-of-touch plutocrat who he said lectures hard-working Americans on the need to be more productive.

"I don't care about how many ways you try to explain it," the president said, mocking a line Mr. Romney once used while campaigning. "Corporations aren't people. People are people."

Many of the president's points were familiar, having been grist for remarks at countless fund-raisers. But these rallies - at Virginia Commonwealth University and Ohio State University - provided him with his first chance to shrug off the tension between governing and campaigning and plunge into campaign mode.

Appearing without a jacket or tie, his preferred look during his first campaign, Mr. Obama spoke with a combative tone, his voice becoming hoarse toward the end, as he pleaded for support for another four years in office.

As reinforcement, Mr. Obama brought along his wife, Michelle, to introduce him. The first lady, wearing a turquoise dress that almost matched the sea of blue placards, tried to warm up the crowd with a slogan from 2008.

"It sounds like you all are already fired up and ready to go," she said to a swell of cheers. "Let me tell you, I'm pretty fired up and ready to go myself."

Recounting the story of her father's struggles to put her and her brother through college, Mrs. Obama said her husband was fighting for an America where everybody gets a shot at success.

The atmosphere at both rallies was buoyant and the crowds were sizable, though in Columbus the turnout did not fill the Schottenstein Center's 18,300 seats. David Plouffe, a senior adviser to the president, said he was happy with the crowds at this point noting that they dwarfed those that turned out for Mr. Romney.

At times, the rallies had the feeling of a concert by an aging rock star: a few supporters were wearing faded "Hope" and Obama 2008 T-shirts, and cheers went up when the president told people to tell their friends that this campaign was "still about hope" and "still about change."

The rallies came at the end of a week that showcased some of Mr. Obama's greatest strengths and most acute weaknesses: his national security and counterterrorism credentials - on display during a surprise visit to Afghanistan on the first anniversary of the raid that killed Osama bin Laden - and his stewardship of the economy, called into question yet again by Friday's weak employment report.

Mr. Romney did not campaign on Saturday, yielding the spotlight to the president. And Mr. Obama deployed the full trappings of his office, flying in Air Force One and riding in his armored limousine, flags flapping from the fenders.

A Romney spokeswoman, Andrea Saul, said in a statement: "No matter how many lofty campaign speeches President Obama gives, the fact remains that American families are struggling on his watch: to pay their bills, find a job and keep their homes."

The president drew some of his loudest applause when he spoke of ending the war in Iraq and of the raid that killed Bin Laden. "By 2014," he said, "the war in Afghanistan will be over."

He also struck a chord on women's issues. "We don't need another political fight about ending a woman's right to choose, or getting rid of Planned Parenthood or taking away access to affordable birth control," he said to noisy cheers. "I want women to control their own health choices."

While Mr. Obama defended other elements of his record, including the health care law that is in legal jeopardy at the Supreme Court, he devoted most of his remarks to trying to define Mr. Romney before Mr. Romney has a chance to define himself to voters. Campaign advisers said the president would hammer at his opponent in coming weeks.

"For the American people, the next few months will be sort of an intense burrowing in on the candidates, though more on Romney than on us, because they know us," said David Axelrod, a senior Obama campaign strategist. "Views will not set, but be hardened over the summer. By the time you get to Labor Day, I don't think you're going to be able to change impressions greatly over the fall."

In Ohio, digital gizmos lent the rally the techno-dazzle of an Apple product introduction. Attendees could have their pictures taken and posted on a giant screen during the rally. They sent text messages to register for "Backstage with Barack," a drawing to meet the president. There was also a mobile field office, where supporters sampled life as a volunteer in a campaign office.

No amount of show business, however, can replicate the euphoria of 2008, as some in the audience acknowledged. Roshni Patel, 19, from Columbus, said "the excitement is still high, though maybe not as high as four years ago." But she said students credited Mr. Obama with trying to create jobs and fighting to keep interest rates low on student loans. "That means a lot to me personally," she said.

Ms. Patel said she had not really focused much on Mr. Romney, but was inclined to stick with Mr. Obama. "People really think he's done a lot," she said. "He killed Bin Laden."

Mark Landler reported from Columbus and Richmond, Va. Michael D. Shear and Jeff Zeleny contributed reporting from Washington.

sweet-a-kins
by Ruby Member on May. 7, 2012 at 11:12 AM
3 moms liked this

 lmao.

Obama had 14,000

Romney's largest crowd?

3000

imamomzilla
by on May. 7, 2012 at 11:13 AM
3 moms liked this

 LOL ^^^ Right on cue

imamomzilla
by on May. 7, 2012 at 11:14 AM

 bouncing

Quoting rocketracer:

I'm surprised the Obama Team didn't hire seat fillers like Hollywood does for the OSCARs or at least produce mass cardboard faceless lifesize cutouts of Julia to fill the stands.  

 

sweet-a-kins
by Ruby Member on May. 7, 2012 at 11:15 AM
1 mom liked this

 Why would he?

He had 14000 at his rally

Romney's biggest crowd for the past year was 3000

 

Quoting imamomzilla:

 bouncing

Quoting rocketracer:

I'm surprised the Obama Team didn't hire seat fillers like Hollywood does for the OSCARs or at least produce mass cardboard faceless lifesize cutouts of Julia to fill the stands.  

 

 

sweet-a-kins
by Ruby Member on May. 7, 2012 at 11:18 AM
2 moms liked this

 I know right? someone needs to give you FACTS and shit...

Romneys empty rally (ies)

Mitt Romney speaks at Ford Field

Romney opened himself up to derision for choosing a 70,000-seat stadium which attracted just over 1,000 people, many of them school children bussed in to help fill out the crowd, tucked into a corner of the astro-turf pitch

Quoting imamomzilla:

 LOL ^^^ Right on cue

 

rocketracer
by Gold Member on May. 7, 2012 at 11:24 AM
1 mom liked this

Romney isn't the POTUS....although over the weekend Joe Biden on Meet the Press did call Romney "President Romney"...

Quoting sweet-a-kins:

 I know right? someone needs to give you FACTS and shit...

Romneys empty rally (ies)

Mitt Romney speaks at Ford Field

Romney opened himself up to derision for choosing a 70,000-seat stadium which attracted just over 1,000 people, many of them school children bussed in to help fill out the crowd, tucked into a corner of the astro-turf pitch

Quoting imamomzilla:

 LOL ^^^ Right on cue

 

 

sweet-a-kins
by Ruby Member on May. 7, 2012 at 11:28 AM
1 mom liked this

 In May 2008 while campaigning for POTUS...

An estimated 75,000 gathered on the banks of the Willamette River in Portland on Sunday to see Barack Obama.

 

In May of 2012, Romney drew less than 3000

Obama Event

Quoting rocketracer:

Romney isn't the POTUS....although over the weekend Joe Biden on Meet the Press did call Romney "President Romeny"...

Quoting sweet-a-kins:

 I know right? someone needs to give you FACTS and shit...

Romneys empty rally (ies)

Mitt Romney speaks at Ford Field

Romney opened himself up to derision for choosing a 70,000-seat stadium which attracted just over 1,000 people, many of them school children bussed in to help fill out the crowd, tucked into a corner of the astro-turf pitch

Quoting imamomzilla:

 LOL ^^^ Right on cue

 

 

 

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