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News & Politics News & Politics

In 67 of Kentucky's 120 counties, "uncommitted" received more votes than Obama

Posted by on May. 23, 2012 at 1:18 PM
  • 36 Replies
1 mom liked this

‘Uncommitted' and unknown score points against Obama

President Obama easily won Tuesday night's Democratic primary in Kentucky, capturing 58 percent of the vote.

That sounds like a solid victory. But with the president running unopposed in the Bluegrass State that means more than four in 10 voters didn't pick him.

Who did they choose instead? Forty-two percent of those going to the polls rejected the president in favor of "uncommitted."

And, according to Louisville's Courier-Journal newspaper, in 67 of Kentucky's 120 counties, "uncommitted" received more votes than the president.

Over in Arkansas, where he had an actual opponent, Obama lost a similar percentage of the vote. According to preliminary returns from the state's open primary, John Wolfe, a lawyer from Tennessee, is polling at about 40 percent.

Though little known, Wolfe is no stranger to politics. The Washington Post reports he was previously on the primary ballots in Louisiana, Missouri and New Hampshire, and will be on next week's ballot in Texas. He has also run four failed campaigns for Congress.

Both Kentucky and Arkansas are considered solid red states for the general election and their less than enthusiastic support for the president comes as no surprise. Still, as the AP points out, "it's a bit embarrassing for the Democratic Party and highlights Obama's political weakness in Southern states."

Just two weeks ago, more than 40 percent of voters in West Virginia's Democratic primary chose a federal inmate named Keith Judd over the president.

by on May. 23, 2012 at 1:18 PM
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Replies (1-10):
asfriend
by on May. 23, 2012 at 1:23 PM

No body wants him, even Democrats don't want him, this is not even the complicated stuff.

sweet-a-kins
by Ruby Member on May. 23, 2012 at 1:52 PM

 It's KY...

 

not surprised

 

but there is hope yet

 

'Rednecks for Obama' sign of times

Rednecks for Obama small.jpg
President-elect Barack Obama in Union, Mo., Wednesday, July 30, 2008. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)

 


by Frank James

 

I haven't had a chance to read as much of the day-after election coverage as I would've liked since I was traveling from traditionally Blue Illinois to nouveau Blue Virginia.

 

But one anecdote that stuck out in all the coverage I pored over today was in the New York Times' story about how President-elect Obama's campaign team ran a near perfect effort to win.

 

It was in what journalists call the "kicker" of the story.

 

Evidently, in recent weeks, people in the Obama and McCain campaigns saw whites who had revealed some racial bias in their survey responses start to shift to Obama.

 

Here's the great kicker:

 

In Mississippi, Stuart Stevens, a longtime political strategist who had worked for both Mr. McCain and Mitt Romney in the primaries, was surveying polling data for a Republican client. He was picking up on an unexpected shift for Mr. Obama, even among white voters. As he put it in an interview: If a house is on fire, the owner does not care what color the fireman is.

 

 

"He transcended race," Mr. Stevens said. "At the time of crisis, it became particularly irrelevant."

 

Back in Washington, Mr. Belcher, the pollster, was finding something similar. Mr. Obama was showing strength even among white voters Mr. Belcher had identified as having racial biases. It was a phenomenon captured in a photograph he shared last week of a homemade sign with the Confederate flag. It read: "Rednecks for Obama. Even we've had enough."

 

rachelrothchild
by on May. 23, 2012 at 1:55 PM

What is that supposed to mean?

Quoting sweet-a-kins:

 It's KY...


not surprised


but there is hope yet


'Rednecks for Obama' sign of times

Rednecks for Obama small.jpg
President-elect Barack Obama in Union, Mo., Wednesday, July 30, 2008. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)



by Frank James


I haven't had a chance to read as much of the day-after election coverage as I would've liked since I was traveling from traditionally Blue Illinois to nouveau Blue Virginia.


But one anecdote that stuck out in all the coverage I pored over today was in the New York Times' story about how President-elect Obama's campaign team ran a near perfect effort to win.


It was in what journalists call the "kicker" of the story.


Evidently, in recent weeks, people in the Obama and McCain campaigns saw whites who had revealed some racial bias in their survey responses start to shift to Obama.


Here's the great kicker:


In Mississippi, Stuart Stevens, a longtime political strategist who had worked for both Mr. McCain and Mitt Romney in the primaries, was surveying polling data for a Republican client. He was picking up on an unexpected shift for Mr. Obama, even among white voters. As he put it in an interview: If a house is on fire, the owner does not care what color the fireman is.



"He transcended race," Mr. Stevens said. "At the time of crisis, it became particularly irrelevant."


Back in Washington, Mr. Belcher, the pollster, was finding something similar. Mr. Obama was showing strength even among white voters Mr. Belcher had identified as having racial biases. It was a phenomenon captured in a photograph he shared last week of a homemade sign with the Confederate flag. It read: "Rednecks for Obama. Even we've had enough."



lylalane7275
by Silver Member on May. 23, 2012 at 1:58 PM
2 moms liked this

These people left their houses and jobs, got in their cars and drove, just to say FU Barack Obama.   Impressive.

sweet-a-kins
by Ruby Member on May. 23, 2012 at 2:01 PM

 Are you denying a race problem exists in KY?

I'm pretty sure you KNOW what it means...

 

Quoting rachelrothchild:

What is that supposed to mean?

Quoting sweet-a-kins:

 It's KY...

 

not surprised

 

but there is hope yet

 

'Rednecks for Obama' sign of times

Rednecks for Obama small.jpg
President-elect Barack Obama in Union, Mo., Wednesday, July 30, 2008. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)

 


by Frank James

 

I haven't had a chance to read as much of the day-after election coverage as I would've liked since I was traveling from traditionally Blue Illinois to nouveau Blue Virginia.

 

But one anecdote that stuck out in all the coverage I pored over today was in the New York Times' story about how President-elect Obama's campaign team ran a near perfect effort to win.

 

It was in what journalists call the "kicker" of the story.

 

Evidently, in recent weeks, people in the Obama and McCain campaigns saw whites who had revealed some racial bias in their survey responses start to shift to Obama.

 

Here's the great kicker:

 

In Mississippi, Stuart Stevens, a longtime political strategist who had worked for both Mr. McCain and Mitt Romney in the primaries, was surveying polling data for a Republican client. He was picking up on an unexpected shift for Mr. Obama, even among white voters. As he put it in an interview: If a house is on fire, the owner does not care what color the fireman is.

 

 

"He transcended race," Mr. Stevens said. "At the time of crisis, it became particularly irrelevant."

 

Back in Washington, Mr. Belcher, the pollster, was finding something similar. Mr. Obama was showing strength even among white voters Mr. Belcher had identified as having racial biases. It was a phenomenon captured in a photograph he shared last week of a homemade sign with the Confederate flag. It read: "Rednecks for Obama. Even we've had enough."

 


 

imamomzilla
by on May. 23, 2012 at 2:10 PM

 laughing

rocketracer
by Gold Member on May. 23, 2012 at 2:13 PM


Quoting sweet-a-kins:

 It's KY...

 

not surprised

 

but there is hope yet

 

'Rednecks for Obama' sign of times

Rednecks for Obama small.jpg
President-elect Barack Obama in Union, Mo., Wednesday, July 30, 2008. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)

 


by Frank James

 

I haven't had a chance to read as much of the day-after election coverage as I would've liked since I was traveling from traditionally Blue Illinois to nouveau Blue Virginia.

 

But one anecdote that stuck out in all the coverage I pored over today was in the New York Times' story about how President-elect Obama's campaign team ran a near perfect effort to win.

 

It was in what journalists call the "kicker" of the story.

 

Evidently, in recent weeks, people in the Obama and McCain campaigns saw whites who had revealed some racial bias in their survey responses start to shift to Obama.

 

Here's the great kicker:

 

In Mississippi, Stuart Stevens, a longtime political strategist who had worked for both Mr. McCain and Mitt Romney in the primaries, was surveying polling data for a Republican client. He was picking up on an unexpected shift for Mr. Obama, even among white voters. As he put it in an interview: If a house is on fire, the owner does not care what color the fireman is.

 

 

"He transcended race," Mr. Stevens said. "At the time of crisis, it became particularly irrelevant."

 

Back in Washington, Mr. Belcher, the pollster, was finding something similar. Mr. Obama was showing strength even among white voters Mr. Belcher had identified as having racial biases. It was a phenomenon captured in a photograph he shared last week of a homemade sign with the Confederate flag. It read: "Rednecks for Obama. Even we've had enough."

 

According to the caption under the photo, the photo was taken in MO in 2008. 

ExecutiveChick
by Silver Member on May. 23, 2012 at 2:16 PM
1 mom liked this

There seems to be a "Race problem" nationwide and it is with people like you who don't know the difference between racist and racial much less know what the definitions of these words are.

Just because people don't like PBO's policies, or even dislike him does NOT equal racism. But you just keep on trying to use that race card. See how far it gets you the more you mis use it.

Quoting sweet-a-kins:

 Are you denying a race problem exists in KY?

I'm pretty sure you KNOW what it means...

 

Quoting rachelrothchild:

What is that supposed to mean?

Quoting sweet-a-kins:

 It's KY...


not surprised


but there is hope yet


'Rednecks for Obama' sign of times

Rednecks for Obama small.jpg
President-elect Barack Obama in Union, Mo., Wednesday, July 30, 2008. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)



by Frank James


I haven't had a chance to read as much of the day-after election coverage as I would've liked since I was traveling from traditionally Blue Illinois to nouveau Blue Virginia.


But one anecdote that stuck out in all the coverage I pored over today was in the New York Times' story about how President-elect Obama's campaign team ran a near perfect effort to win.


It was in what journalists call the "kicker" of the story.


Evidently, in recent weeks, people in the Obama and McCain campaigns saw whites who had revealed some racial bias in their survey responses start to shift to Obama.


Here's the great kicker:


In Mississippi, Stuart Stevens, a longtime political strategist who had worked for both Mr. McCain and Mitt Romney in the primaries, was surveying polling data for a Republican client. He was picking up on an unexpected shift for Mr. Obama, even among white voters. As he put it in an interview: If a house is on fire, the owner does not care what color the fireman is.



"He transcended race," Mr. Stevens said. "At the time of crisis, it became particularly irrelevant."


Back in Washington, Mr. Belcher, the pollster, was finding something similar. Mr. Obama was showing strength even among white voters Mr. Belcher had identified as having racial biases. It was a phenomenon captured in a photograph he shared last week of a homemade sign with the Confederate flag. It read: "Rednecks for Obama. Even we've had enough."



 


asfriend
by on May. 23, 2012 at 2:31 PM
1 mom liked this

Only if you call the space between your ears - Ky-  becuase that is where the problem lies.

Quoting sweet-a-kins:

 Are you denying a race problem exists in KY?

I'm pretty sure you KNOW what it means...

 

Quoting rachelrothchild:

What is that supposed to mean?

Quoting sweet-a-kins:

 It's KY...

 

not surprised

 

but there is hope yet

 

'Rednecks for Obama' sign of times

Rednecks for Obama small.jpg
President-elect Barack Obama in Union, Mo., Wednesday, July 30, 2008. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)

 


by Frank James

 

I haven't had a chance to read as much of the day-after election coverage as I would've liked since I was traveling from traditionally Blue Illinois to nouveau Blue Virginia.

 

But one anecdote that stuck out in all the coverage I pored over today was in the New York Times' story about how President-elect Obama's campaign team ran a near perfect effort to win.

 

It was in what journalists call the "kicker" of the story.

 

Evidently, in recent weeks, people in the Obama and McCain campaigns saw whites who had revealed some racial bias in their survey responses start to shift to Obama.

 

Here's the great kicker:

 

In Mississippi, Stuart Stevens, a longtime political strategist who had worked for both Mr. McCain and Mitt Romney in the primaries, was surveying polling data for a Republican client. He was picking up on an unexpected shift for Mr. Obama, even among white voters. As he put it in an interview: If a house is on fire, the owner does not care what color the fireman is.

 

 

"He transcended race," Mr. Stevens said. "At the time of crisis, it became particularly irrelevant."

 

Back in Washington, Mr. Belcher, the pollster, was finding something similar. Mr. Obama was showing strength even among white voters Mr. Belcher had identified as having racial biases. It was a phenomenon captured in a photograph he shared last week of a homemade sign with the Confederate flag. It read: "Rednecks for Obama. Even we've had enough."

 


 


ExecutiveChick
by Silver Member on May. 23, 2012 at 2:37 PM
1 mom liked this

We don't even know what race "Uncommitted" is. He/She may be 100% black and the KY Democrats may have voted for Him/Her over PBO because they don't like PBO's white half???

You don't know.

laughing

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