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News & Politics News & Politics

Civility in Politics DOES Exist

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"Civility DOES exist in politics, just not in every place or with all people. We each chose what kind of tone we perpetuate, reverse, or create, whether by our speech or our silence."

Choose wisely.

The most pressing social issue today is the economy

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by on Jun. 13, 2012 at 5:27 AM
Replies (41-50):
bookmommy
by on Jun. 14, 2012 at 3:30 PM

It's true to a point..but I see on here quite often where people use inflammatory type words when they talk with someone and then wonder why no one wants to have a "rational debate".

Quoting matreshka:

And that is a major limitation of discussion and debate online. Tone does not really come through and that can set off a rational conversation into mudslinging.

Quoting bookmommy:

Good quote. I think sometimes people are so adamant about getting THEIR views out that they don't think about what kind of tone or language they use when responding to people. I have always maintained, it's not what you say, it's HOW its said.


bookmommy
by on Jun. 14, 2012 at 3:32 PM
1 mom liked this

Exactly. If someone were to call me "clueless", the rest of what they said would be ignored. Name calling is the first thing that gets my back up. There are better ways of getting your point across.

Quoting Pema_Jampa:

No need to say any of those things. You can debate a point without calling people uninformed and clueless. 


godotherightthi
by on Jun. 14, 2012 at 3:40 PM
2 moms liked this

 Haha, I noticed the cushiones too!  I think that sometimes exiting the building is the best option in terms of civility.  Or calling security :)

Quoting Kate_Momof3:

The right side also goes right out a door...

Just sayin'. 

big smile mini

Quoting Jambo4:

I've got to ask about your picture... does it have anything to do with your quote.. if it does I'm not getting it.

I tried to break it down into Right and Left...  the path is much longer on the Left... the Right has less cushioned benches... wink mini

It looks like Canterbury Cathedral somewhat... ;)


 

Jambo4
by Gold Member on Jun. 14, 2012 at 3:41 PM
2 moms liked this

I'll tell ya.. if I'm called uninformed or clueless.. those are fighting words!  It does two things.. it shows me the poster is arrogant and thinks they are more educated/smarter than I am, and also that they are trying to dismiss my comments and my being as stupid.  I may be wrong on the point but I wasn't intentionally being wrong and don't appreciate the cut down.

Now "misinformed" is less inflammatory.  Anyone call be misinformed by getting bad info or tainted info.  That's not so bad to me.  It still shows that the person posting has gathered some info on the subject.

Quoting bookmommy:

Exactly. If someone were to call me "clueless", the rest of what they said would be ignored. Name calling is the first thing that gets my back up. There are better ways of getting your point across.

Quoting Pema_Jampa:

No need to say any of those things. You can debate a point without calling people uninformed and clueless. 



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Jambo4
by Gold Member on Jun. 14, 2012 at 3:44 PM
1 mom liked this

Maybe the Left STOLE the cushion! wink mini And maybe the shortened exit means you spend less time trapped inside and can get out in "the real world" if you choose the Right?! big smile mini

Quoting godotherightthi:

 Haha, I noticed the cushiones too!  I think that sometimes exiting the building is the best option in terms of civility.  Or calling security :)

Quoting Kate_Momof3:

The right side also goes right out a door...

Just sayin'. 

big smile mini

Quoting Jambo4:

I've got to ask about your picture... does it have anything to do with your quote.. if it does I'm not getting it.

I tried to break it down into Right and Left...  the path is much longer on the Left... the Right has less cushioned benches... wink mini

It looks like Canterbury Cathedral somewhat... ;)


 


Meadowchik
by Gold Member on Jun. 14, 2012 at 3:52 PM
1 mom liked this

I believe in civility and civil discourse as a moral principle.  It stems from my very most personal beliefs and ideals; I feel that Truth has a direct relationship with civility.  Here's an essay describing debate, entitled "Indepensable Opposition." It supports the idea that good debate is a means to seeking for the truth:

http://grossmont.gcccd.cc.ca.us/bertdill/docs/IndispensableOpposition.pdf

Civility makes actual debate possible, where then the exchange of ideas and the deliberate confrontation of conflicting ideas provides a fertile atmosphere of growth.

Looking at it from a more scientific and historical angle, anthropology confirms the significance of the ability to exchange ideas on the arc of human progress:

"Further proof that exchange and collective intelligence are the key to human progress comes from Neanderthal remains. Almost all Neanderthal tools are found close to their likely site of origin: they did not trade. In the southern Caucasus, argues Daniel Adler of the University of Connecticut, it is the "development and maintenance of larger social networks, rather than technological innovations or increased hunting prowess, that distinguish modern humans from Neanderthals."

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB1000...386933138.html


The article describes how trade improved the diversity of exchanged ideas, which helps to create more ideas, more discovery.  Trade would not be possible without some level of civility.  Therefore, civility plays an essential role in progress, or, as I would say, the human journey of more closely approaching goodness and truth.


The most pressing social issue today is the economy

Visit Mitt Romney for President, CafeMom Group

godotherightthi
by on Jun. 14, 2012 at 3:53 PM
1 mom liked this

 I think part of the tone is knowing how to manuever online.  Just like IRL I tend to have pretty good boundaries and don't associate with people I don't like, online if I see a post from someone I know has a history of being uncivil, I tend to not even click on it.  It has made my overall opinion of the group better than when I first joined.

Quoting Kate_Momof3:

If it's Chicago, it's not that old. It's still beautiful; lots of Moorish influence, don't you think?

Anywho, that's a nice quote. I agree with everything you've said, Meadow, but since most of our discourse is dictated by what we are fed by the media and how those within the media conduct themselves, I have to say getting to the point of being civil and capable of discussing a topic while STAYING on that topic is going to be one LOOOOOOONG journey.

 

Debrowsky
by Silver Member on Jun. 14, 2012 at 4:38 PM


Quoting asfriend:

Pointing out when someone is uninformed, or clueless is not hateful or uncivil it is simply the right thing to do. If enough people are blunt and to the point, here and everywhere maybe we can avoid another disaster like we currently are suffering.  ~    EXACTLY!


Kate_Momof3
by Platinum Member on Jun. 14, 2012 at 5:43 PM

Jambo, I have to tell you that avatar of yours makes it very difficult to get combative with you. It still cracks me up.  

I agree. It's nicer to say, "that's not correct information." It's even better to back it up with evidence. And, yes, yes, YES...we ALL need to acknowledge the fact that when someone makes a mistake or has gotten something wrong, the best thing to do is just give evidence to the contrary. And to do it with a bit of grace.

Quoting Jambo4:

I'll tell ya.. if I'm called uninformed or clueless.. those are fighting words!  It does two things.. it shows me the poster is arrogant and thinks they are more educated/smarter than I am, and also that they are trying to dismiss my comments and my being as stupid.  I may be wrong on the point but I wasn't intentionally being wrong and don't appreciate the cut down.

Now "misinformed" is less inflammatory.  Anyone call be misinformed by getting bad info or tainted info.  That's not so bad to me.  It still shows that the person posting has gathered some info on the subject.

Quoting bookmommy:

Exactly. If someone were to call me "clueless", the rest of what they said would be ignored. Name calling is the first thing that gets my back up. There are better ways of getting your point across.

Quoting Pema_Jampa:

No need to say any of those things. You can debate a point without calling people uninformed and clueless. 




Kate_Momof3
by Platinum Member on Jun. 14, 2012 at 5:45 PM

Wise words.

I try not to engage those who are just so blinded by their bias that they're beyond hope. I like engaging those who I know I may not always agree with, but can at least be friendly with (carpy).

Quoting godotherightthi:

 I think part of the tone is knowing how to manuever online.  Just like IRL I tend to have pretty good boundaries and don't associate with people I don't like, online if I see a post from someone I know has a history of being uncivil, I tend to not even click on it.  It has made my overall opinion of the group better than when I first joined.

Quoting Kate_Momof3:

If it's Chicago, it's not that old. It's still beautiful; lots of Moorish influence, don't you think?

Anywho, that's a nice quote. I agree with everything you've said, Meadow, but since most of our discourse is dictated by what we are fed by the media and how those within the media conduct themselves, I have to say getting to the point of being civil and capable of discussing a topic while STAYING on that topic is going to be one LOOOOOOONG journey.

 


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