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News & Politics News & Politics

Latest Cover of Time Magazine: 35 Illegal Aliens Claiming ‘We Are Americans*'

Pulitzer Prize Winning Journalist Jose Antonia Vargas Appears with 35 Illegal Immigrants on Time Cover

Pulitzer Prize winning journalist Jose Antonia Vargas revealed himself to be an illegal alien living in the U.S. (Source: Time Magazine)

Pulitzer Prize winning journalist Jose Antonio Vargas made headlines last year when he came out and publicly revealed himself to be an illegal alien living and working in the United States.

(Related: Former WaPo, HuffPo Journalist Admits He's an Illegal Immigrant)

He has not been contacted by the government since making the announcement, which he argues was intended to make the point that illegal immigration is not being addressed.

Well, Vargas is stirring the immigration pot again and is featured on the cover of the latest issue of Time Magazine along with 35 other illegal aliens - who all name themselves in the article and tell their stories, CBS News reports. There are reportedly about 12 million illegal aliens living in the U.S.

He wants everyone to know that the American people just don't understand this issue.

"We are not who you think we are," Vargas said Thursday on "CBS This Morning."

"To me, the power of this Time magazine cover is, you have 35 people here from 15 different countries, Mexico, Nigeria, Israel, Korea, Philippines. You know, when we think about illegal immigration, we seem think it's all about Mexicans and the border. That's not the reality."

He is absolutely right about that. As many of our readers know, there are immigrants from all over the world pouring across our border.

During the interview, he was asked “How is that you are able to [get paid]?…you are an illegal immigrant.” Vargas disputed quickly, “an undocumented American actually.”

He went on to explain that he is able to be paid as an independent contractor just not as a salaried employee, the same way “undocumented Americans” working as construction workers or laborers are able to make a living.

“Ordinary Americans have such a profound misunderstanding and misperceptions about what this issue is,” Vargas said.

Vargas claims he and the 35 other “undocumented workers” now worry about being deported. “But what’s even more worrisome is not doing anything about it,” he added.

“At the end of the day, most people in my situation haven’t been encountered by the government. There’s 11.5 million of us, right? Most people have not been encountered,” Vargas told CBS This Morning. “… I am about as public as it comes on this. I’m on Twitter, I’m on Facebook. I’m on the corner of 14th and 6th in Manhattan.”

“We’re almost invisibly visible,” he continued. “You know we’re here. So allow us to come forward and say, ‘Hey, if you want us to pay our back taxes, if you want us to wait in some sort of line. If you want us to learn to speak English,’ … But give us the process that we can enter.”

Vargas also used the interview to base Republican Presidential candidate Mitt Romney in a thinly veiled critique on conservatives who tend to be more strict when it comes to border security.

“I remember being in Iowa in Cedar Rapids and Mitt Romney telling the audience (that) people like me should get in the back of the line,” the journalist said. “Where is the line? If they can tell us where it is, if it’s in Times Square somewhere, I’ll go there right now. There is no line, there is no process.”

It doesn’t appear that Vargas is advocating for amnesty for all individuals, but instead advocating for a process that all immigrants can enter into.

 

by on Jun. 14, 2012 at 10:01 PM
Replies (21-27):
Ednarooni160
by Eds on Jun. 15, 2012 at 3:34 PM


Quoting asfriend:


Quoting itsmesteph11:

 Guess that's a non issue now.


I wouldn't bet on that.


I think (assuming) this is the second time in two groups I've been labeled luke warm and/or not a true Christian..(sigh). It's tough being an oreo christian.  I'm talking about "coffee" oreos, not to be confused with black and white ones.

VeronicaTex
by on Jun. 15, 2012 at 7:14 PM


Quoting itsmesteph11:

 

Quoting VeronicaTex:

This:  "It doesn't appear that Vargas is advocating for amnesty for all individuals, but instead advocating for a process that all immigrants can enter into"

Since my personal experience is working with Mexican and Central Americans I will comment here-on the speaking English part.

It is very disturbing that many Americans do not know what it is to learn a second language. No it's not. What is disturbing is the fact that you think you have the right to judge people. People who want to learn other languages do so not out of shame but out of necessity or want. Their are many who do and many who see no reason to know another language. Certainly it is not a good reason to learn another language for the convenience of those who don't Speaak English.

This is what I believe is causing the most animosity of people who are against immigrants being here in the first place.  I will just say that the person who has never been in as dire a situation as most immigrants will never understand what they are going through.  By the way, those Americans who are saying this are the ones being judgmental, if you must be pointing any fingers.

They demand it from the immigrants coming here without the SLIGHTEST iota of personal knowledge of just what that entails.

I know from learning Spanish as a Second language..  I knew 5 words when I went to Bolivia at age 17 as a Rotary Exchange Student.  By the way, I lived with two very wealthy families and attended an American-run school and an all-girl Catholic school.   In general we should demand it  but it's obvious we don't since all government paperwork, signs, phone systems and so on and on cover oodles of  languages. We actually cater to immigrants more than we do Americans.  Should we demand it?  Yes, we should just as other countries do.  You were in another country when you learned your language which just proves my point.

I did not make my point very clear, I see.  My point is that it was my choice to be an Exchange Student and I was not living in poverty as most of the immigrants are.  I was in a very delightful situation as compared to immigrants.  I have had the leisure of learning Spanish when I wanted to, not out of survival. 

It takes getting involved in the culture and letting oneself be bathed in the second language.  It involves trust to speak to another person and be understood beyond a very thick,   accent besides that person being listened to getting beyond the fact that foreign person is probably dressed differently, has darker skin and a certain humbleness about him/her that some Americans can't EVEN begin to understand. I find it funny how you make my case so well  for why immigrants should be learning English and our culture. I already live here I should not be the one to become immersed in their culture and to bend to their needs. As you say, they should be doing just that.

You could be a lot less bigoted and make an attempt to be understanding of another human being.

We can all tell when we are not welcome.  I have never felt that, not being an Exchange Student nor being married to a Mexican nor being around Mexican/American and Mexican people almost all of the time.

The illegal immigrant is very cautious.    This can be falsely interpreted for being sneaky or having devious interior motives...Not so..

Back to the Second language learning from an immigrant child's teacher's perspective.

It is a fact it takes 5 to 7 years for a child to successfully learn English to cope in our educational system  This is a person at school, not those at home or at work. Actually  with a good immersion program it is fairly easy for a young child to learn English. Starting in Peschool (which is free for most immigrants) by the time they are in 1st or 2nd grade they get along great speaking English and being caught up to their Americaan counterparts in class. I'm sure it is harder for adults for many reasons but don't excuse trying.

It is very obvious you have never been a classroom teacher : Bilingual or typical.  I could write for hours contesting your lame blanket statement.  When I said 5 to 7 years, I was referring to a statistic my bilingual director, who worked in Mexico and the United States with people of all languages for over 20 years told us Bilingual/ESL teachers. 

I also saw this for myself. What have you truly seen with your own eyes????

There are two types of English:  Social and Academic.

Learning English as a Second Language is not as easy as Learning Spanish as a Second Language.   You might ask my kids who took Spanish for 2 yrs in hs and still can't speak Spanish about that.

Every language learner is different.  Two years is nothing.   A language learner must get out with actual Spanish speakers if they expect to learn anything.

If you really knew the Spanish language inside and out and compared it with our pronunciation (vowels, in particular) grammar and slang, you would see very clearly what I am saying.

I just hope, therefore, that when someone gets up on their soapbox and declares:  "THOSE PEOPLE COMING HERE SHOULD BE USING ENGLISH!!!!!" that they could put themselves in the shoes of a person who has left their home under the most horrific of life and death circumstances that are here FIRST to survive and  "speaking English" NOT being their first priority. When you went to Bolivia I think Speaking the language of the country you were in was pretty high on your list as it should have been. I think communicating SHOULD be number 1 for anyone going to a new Country.\

And those folks will, also  once they get beyond taking care of their children and working a job...

These folks need time, understanding and acceptance.

They will do it eventually.

Oh pleeeze .........

But NOT in the average American's totally unreasonable timeline, thinking of how rapidly these people should be learning English.

Reality check, people,  who don't know what they are demanding !!!!

Veronica-Bilingual/ESL teacher for nine years, English/Spanish speaker for life and the rest of her lifetime.




 


pvtjokerus
by Gold Member on Jun. 15, 2012 at 8:15 PM

Sorry for butting in....but do you mean coconut? 

Quoting Ednarooni160:

 

Quoting asfriend:

 

Quoting itsmesteph11:

 Guess that's a non issue now.


I wouldn't bet on that.

 

I think (assuming) this is the second time in two groups I've been labeled luke warm and/or not a true Christian..(sigh). It's tough being an oreo christian.  I'm talking about "coffee" oreos, not to be confused with black and white ones.


Ednarooni160
by Eds on Jun. 15, 2012 at 8:43 PM


Quoting pvtjokerus:

Sorry for butting in....but do you mean coconut? 

Quoting Ednarooni160:


Quoting asfriend:


Quoting itsmesteph11:

 Guess that's a non issue now.


I wouldn't bet on that.


I think (assuming) this is the second time in two groups I've been labeled luke warm and/or not a true Christian..(sigh). It's tough being an oreo christian.  I'm talking about "coffee" oreos, not to be confused with black and white ones.


No..lol I have no idea what that means..what does it mean?  I'm talking about being half and half (luke warm).  I'm .being "silly"..

sweet-a-kins
by Ruby Member on Jun. 15, 2012 at 11:01 PM
She does have the right to judge

We all do



Quoting itsmesteph11:

 


Quoting VeronicaTex:


This:  "It doesn't appear that Vargas is advocating for amnesty for all individuals, but instead advocating for a process that all immigrants can enter into"


Since my personal experience is working with Mexican and Central Americans I will comment here-on the speaking English part.


It is very disturbing that many Americans do not know what it is to learn a second language. No it's not. What is disturbing is the fact that you think you have the right to judge people. People who want to learn other languages do so not out of shame but out of necessity or want. Their are many who do and many who see no reason to know another language. Certainly it is not a good reason to learn another language for the convenience of those who don't Speaak English.


They demand it from the immigrants coming here without the SLIGHTEST iota of personal knowledge of just what that entails.


I know from learning Spanish as a Second language..  I knew 5 words when I went to Bolivia at age 17 as a Rotary Exchange Student.  By the way, I lived with two very wealthy families and attended an American-run school and an all-girl Catholic school.   In general we should demand it  but it's obvious we don't since all government paperwork, signs, phone systems and so on and on cover oodles of  languages. We actually cater to immigrants more than we do Americans.  Should we demand it?  Yes, we should just as other countries do.  You were in another country when you learned your language which just proves my point.


It takes getting involved in the culture and letting oneself be bathed in the second language.  It involves trust to speak to another person and be understood beyond a very thick,   accent besides that person being listened to getting beyond the fact that foreign person is probably dressed differently, has darker skin and a certain humbleness about him/her that some Americans can't EVEN begin to understand. I find it funny how you make my case so well  for why immigrants should be learning English and our culture. I already live here I should not be the one to become immersed in their culture and to bend to their needs. As you say, they should be doing just that.


We can all tell when we are not welcome.  I have never felt that, not being an Exchange Student nor being married to a Mexican nor being around Mexican/American and Mexican people almost all of the time.


The illegal immigrant is very cautious.    This can be falsely interpreted for being sneaky or having devious interior motives...Not so..


Back to the Second language learning from an immigrant child's teacher's perspective.


It is a fact it takes 5 to 7 years for a child to successfully learn English to cope in our educational system  This is a person at school, not those at home or at work. Actually  with a good immersion program it is fairly easy for a young child to learn English. Starting in Peschool (which is free for most immigrants) by the time they are in 1st or 2nd grade they get along great speaking English and being caught up to their Americaan counterparts in class. I'm sure it is harder for adults for many reasons but don't excuse trying.


There are two types of English:  Social and Academic.


Learning English as a Second Language is not as easy as Learning Spanish as a Second Language.   You might ask my kids who took Spanish for 2 yrs in hs and still can't speak Spanish about that.


I just hope, therefore, that when someone gets up on their soapbox and declares:  "THOSE PEOPLE COMING HERE SHOULD BE USING ENGLISH!!!!!" that they could put themselves in the shoes of a person who has left their home under the most horrific of life and death circumstances that are here FIRST to survive and  "speaking English" NOT being their first priority. When you went to Bolivia I think Speaking the language of the country you were in was pretty high on your list as it should have been. I think communicating SHOULD be number 1 for anyone going to a new Country.


These folks need time, understanding and acceptance.


They will do it eventually.


Oh pleeeze .........


But NOT in the average American's timing.


Veronica-Bilingual/ESL teacher for nine years, English/Spanish speaker for life and the rest of her lifetime.








 

Posted on CafeMom Mobile
VeronicaTex
by on Jun. 15, 2012 at 11:25 PM

Thank you very much!!!

I like to refer to it as educated observation and having a leg to stand on because I have personal knowledge and experience with the topic. 

I have been there, and lived it.

Veronica

Quoting sweet-a-kins:

She does have the right to judge

We all do



Quoting itsmesteph11:

 


Quoting VeronicaTex:


This:  "It doesn't appear that Vargas is advocating for amnesty for all individuals, but instead advocating for a process that all immigrants can enter into"


Since my personal experience is working with Mexican and Central Americans I will comment here-on the speaking English part.


It is very disturbing that many Americans do not know what it is to learn a second language. No it's not. What is disturbing is the fact that you think you have the right to judge people. People who want to learn other languages do so not out of shame but out of necessity or want. Their are many who do and many who see no reason to know another language. Certainly it is not a good reason to learn another language for the convenience of those who don't Speaak English.


They demand it from the immigrants coming here without the SLIGHTEST iota of personal knowledge of just what that entails.


I know from learning Spanish as a Second language..  I knew 5 words when I went to Bolivia at age 17 as a Rotary Exchange Student.  By the way, I lived with two very wealthy families and attended an American-run school and an all-girl Catholic school.   In general we should demand it  but it's obvious we don't since all government paperwork, signs, phone systems and so on and on cover oodles of  languages. We actually cater to immigrants more than we do Americans.  Should we demand it?  Yes, we should just as other countries do.  You were in another country when you learned your language which just proves my point.


It takes getting involved in the culture and letting oneself be bathed in the second language.  It involves trust to speak to another person and be understood beyond a very thick,   accent besides that person being listened to getting beyond the fact that foreign person is probably dressed differently, has darker skin and a certain humbleness about him/her that some Americans can't EVEN begin to understand. I find it funny how you make my case so well  for why immigrants should be learning English and our culture. I already live here I should not be the one to become immersed in their culture and to bend to their needs. As you say, they should be doing just that.


We can all tell when we are not welcome.  I have never felt that, not being an Exchange Student nor being married to a Mexican nor being around Mexican/American and Mexican people almost all of the time.


The illegal immigrant is very cautious.    This can be falsely interpreted for being sneaky or having devious interior motives...Not so..


Back to the Second language learning from an immigrant child's teacher's perspective.


It is a fact it takes 5 to 7 years for a child to successfully learn English to cope in our educational system  This is a person at school, not those at home or at work. Actually  with a good immersion program it is fairly easy for a young child to learn English. Starting in Peschool (which is free for most immigrants) by the time they are in 1st or 2nd grade they get along great speaking English and being caught up to their Americaan counterparts in class. I'm sure it is harder for adults for many reasons but don't excuse trying.


There are two types of English:  Social and Academic.


Learning English as a Second Language is not as easy as Learning Spanish as a Second Language.   You might ask my kids who took Spanish for 2 yrs in hs and still can't speak Spanish about that.


I just hope, therefore, that when someone gets up on their soapbox and declares:  "THOSE PEOPLE COMING HERE SHOULD BE USING ENGLISH!!!!!" that they could put themselves in the shoes of a person who has left their home under the most horrific of life and death circumstances that are here FIRST to survive and  "speaking English" NOT being their first priority. When you went to Bolivia I think Speaking the language of the country you were in was pretty high on your list as it should have been. I think communicating SHOULD be number 1 for anyone going to a new Country.


These folks need time, understanding and acceptance.


They will do it eventually.


Oh pleeeze .........


But NOT in the average American's timing.


Veronica-Bilingual/ESL teacher for nine years, English/Spanish speaker for life and the rest of her lifetime.








 


pvtjokerus
by Gold Member on Jun. 16, 2012 at 8:47 AM
1 mom liked this

See, that is what I get for sticking my nose in where it doesn't belong..lol...I'll just "kindly" step back out... ;  )

Quoting Ednarooni160:

 

Quoting pvtjokerus:

Sorry for butting in....but do you mean coconut? 

Quoting Ednarooni160:

 

Quoting asfriend:

 

Quoting itsmesteph11:

 Guess that's a non issue now.


I wouldn't bet on that.

 

I think (assuming) this is the second time in two groups I've been labeled luke warm and/or not a true Christian..(sigh). It's tough being an oreo christian.  I'm talking about "coffee" oreos, not to be confused with black and white ones.

 

No..lol I have no idea what that means..what does it mean?  I'm talking about being half and half (luke warm).  I'm .being "silly"..


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