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Fringy Fraud: Darrell Issa’s Fast and Furious Exposed

Posted by on Jun. 22, 2012 at 8:27 PM
  • 13 Replies

Fringy Fraud: Darrell Issa’s Fast and Furious Exposed

Did you know that way back in mid 2011, it was alleged by multiple sources and backed up by briefing documents that Darrell Issa was briefed on the Fast and Furious on the very same issues he is now trying to hold Attorney General Eric Holder accountable for?

The Washington Post reported in June of 2011, “All of the things [Issa] has been screaming about, he was briefed on,’’ said one source familiar with the session.

Issa claimed that for Holder not to recall the details proved that he was “incompetent” and “negligent”. Yet, Issa claimed he doesn’t remember being briefed on the very same issue. Documents from the meetings say otherwise. To which Issa responded, it is not as much his job as it is Holder’s to watch out for these activities. Huh.

Of course, all of this who knew what when presumes that Issa’s witch hunt is legitimate, and by most accounts, it’s not. Issa’s source is a conspiracy theory of a gun nut, also known as Rachel Maddow dubbed him last night as “the break your windows militia guy” during healthcare reform. Pallin’ around with terrorists, eh Issa?

The crazy guy thinks Fast and Furious is a conspiracy to take away your guns by giving you more guns, because of course if you have more guns you’ll go nuts. He sold this theory (aka; “Obama’s Gun Walker Scheme”) to the NRA who sold it to Fox News who sold it to the House Republicans who are selling it to you.

But since Issa is making such a big deal about this, and using taxpayer money to play partisan games based on conspiracy theories about Obama taking guns away and he’s managed to get the headlines he wanted, we are forced to respond as if he is not a crazy clown (from birthers to O’Keefe pimps to Issa’s gun cleaning friend – the 4th estate loves GOP clowns).

Thus, we note that Darrell Issa might have some questions to answer regarding when he knew about the Fast and Furious great conspiracy, because it turns out that he was briefed on it way back in 2010. Why didn’t he speak up? He claims ATF agents who ran an April 2010 briefing he attended “never mentioned” the Fast and the Furious by name, although documents from the briefing belie this claim, as do additional sources.

On October 14, 2011, Ryan J. Reilly of Talking Points Memo reported:

That contradicts contemporaneous documents prepared for that meetingas well as the claims of officials familiar with the briefing, who say Fast and Furious was, in fact, discussed in detail. Still, Issa’s office says staffers at the meeting don’t recall Fast and Furious coming up and say they weren’t given the briefing materials.

An official with knowledge of the meeting told TPM that Fast and Furious was one of “several cases that were briefed in great detail” at Issa’s April 2010 briefing. The official specifically said that the names of the operations were mentioned in the briefing, which was run by former ATF Director Ken Melson.

Issa claims he didn’t hear what others heard and never got the documents.

Republicans seem to consistently have a tough time doing their jobs. Bush never read the intel regarding the imminent threat to the U.S. via a plane, Republicans can’t read bills, and now they are the only people who don’t get documents at meetings they attend while at the same time managing to not hear what multiple sources heard. And he’s calling Holder incompetent?

Still, this could happen. But did it?

Jerry Markon and Sari Horwitz of The Washington Post had more sources who contradicted Issa’s alleged memory of that briefing:

A chief Republican critic of a controversial U.S. anti-gun-trafficking operation was briefed on ATF’s “Fast and Furious” program last year and did not express any opposition, sources familiar with the classified briefing said Tuesday.

Rep. Darrell Issa (Calif.), who has repeatedly called for top Justice Department officials to be held accountable for the now-defunct operation, was given highly specific information about it at an April 2010 briefing, the sources said. Members of his staff also attended the session, which Issa and two other Republican congressmen had requested.

Issa was there and expressed no opposition to Fast and Furious? Who is going to drag Issa before a committee to answer what he knew and when? No one, that’s who. Democrats won’t do it even if they get back into power. See Karl Rove who refused to even honor the subpoena served to him by the House Judiciary Committee after he refused to appear voluntarily. The Bush DOJ wrote a letter claiming that Karl Rove was “constitutionally immune from compelled congressional testimony.”

That’s an interesting contrast with Democrats, who let Rove go free so as to focus on governing.

“A refusal to appear in violation of the subpoena could subject Mr. Rove to contempt proceedings, including statutory contempt under federal law and proceedings under the inherent contempt authority of the House of Representatives,” Conyers and Sanchez wrote.

Can you imagine if Holder had just flipped Issa the bird and then written a letter excusing everyone, even “aides”, from compulsory testimony? Meanwhile, the vote of contempt against Holder was driven by the gun nuts of this country, with the NRA holding Republican’s ratings hostage unless they voted “yes” on the contempt charge.

Darrell Issa is acting on the allegations of a person who should at the very least have been questioned for inciting violence on numerous occasions. Though, really, who better to do so than Darrell Issa, who has been questioned in his alleged involvement in arson, car theft, pointing a gun at an employee he was firing, and more.

Issa then claimed that the linchpin was Holder claiming to not know about this conspiracy theory. But when it turns out that Issa was briefed on the very issues he claims prove his conspiracy theory, he claims he doesn’t remember being briefed on it and if he was, well, it’s not his job. True, it would fall under Holder’s responsibilities more than Issa’s, but certainly if Issa knew in 2010 about something he thinks is worthy of a contempt citation, he would have spoken up at the time. Why didn’t he?

It’s a shame, but apparently Republicans aren’t going to start governing until all of the mommies and daddies start rebuking their behavior with serious consequences. Thus, Democrats must find time in between cleaning up the Bush economy, dealing with the obstructionists in Congress, and the refusal of Republicans to confirm Obama’s federal justices to deal with the naughty children in the Republican Party.

Otherwise, it’s like giving a match to an angry, impotent arsonist and being surprised when they burn your office down.

by on Jun. 22, 2012 at 8:27 PM
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Replies (1-10):
Pema_Jampa
by 2HotTacoTini on Jun. 22, 2012 at 9:34 PM

BUMP!

imagirlgeek
by Bronze Member on Jun. 22, 2012 at 10:26 PM
2 moms liked this

There is so much wrong in this article...I don't know where to start.

First, Issa is not the head of the DOJ, who oversees ATF.  He is head of the committee tasked to investigate when crap goes sideways in the government.  I would think everyone would be on board with that.  If Holder would have told the truth at the beginning of all this, it would be a non-issue.  We would know who approved it, who dropped the ball, and how to make sure this never happens again.  Instead, Holder first said he didn't know about it at all.  Then he only knew a couple weeks before the first hearing, then about a month before the first hearing.  How many statements have they had to retract?  2, I think.  Holder made statements that he couldn't back up, so he had to retract them.  Isn't that the same as lying?  To say something that you can't prove, get called on it, and take it back?

As for the 'crazy guy' who made up some conspiracy about gun control....I have no idea where this came from, but there are emails that show some shady planning going on.  

ATF used Fast and Furious to make a case for gun regulations - CBSNEWS

And as far as I know, there wasn't a contempt vote on Rove.  If they wanted him that bad, they should have gone through the process.  If he was behaving badly, they should have pushed until they had answers.  Shame on them for letting it go.

--------------------------------------------
You don't have to be judgmental and be like "Oh, he's using his freedom the wrong way!  I want him to use his freedom the way I use my freedom!"  You can't do that. You have to be tolerant.  People say "Oh no, you can't be tolerant. What if they do something you don't like?" Tolerance does not mean endorsement.  -- Ron Paul
1bluediamond
by Bronze Member on Jun. 22, 2012 at 11:19 PM
1 mom liked this



House Republicans have resorted to partisan finger-pointing over 3 percent of the guns crossing the border -- and ignored the other 97 percent.

The Real Scandal of Fast and Furious

Actually, despite silly headlines like this, it's not a complicated story at all. Operation Fast and Furious -- hey, let's give guns to bad guys, what could possibly go wrong? -- was a bad idea, poorly done, and thus not unlike hundreds or thousands of other poorly conceived and executed government plans of recent memory. (Like the Iraq War, for example). The Obama Administration, like the Bush Administration before it, deserves no small measure of blame for thinking that such a dangerous, unwieldy sting could be completed, successfully, without a great deal of unintended pain and sorrow.

To the right, the story has been an election-year blessing, a roiling melange of: (1) gun righteousness; (2) antipathy toward Holder, and; (3) fear and loathing of Mexico and Mexicans. When Colbert mocks the vast "conspiracy" the right sees in all of this -- what's the matter, good old-fashioned bureaucratic incompetence isn't good enough anymore? -- it's hilariously funny until you realize that tens of millions of people evidently believe the plot to be true. "If I lie in a lawsuit involving the fate of my neighbor's cow, I can go to jail," Walter Lippmann wrote in 1919:

But if I lie to a million readers in a matter involving war and peace, I can lie my head off, and, if I choose the right series of lies, be entirely irresponsible.

As I've followed the story -- and so much of it has been told so well by my CBS News colleagueSharyl Attkisson -- I keep thinking about the mission and the frustrations of the Brady Campaign To Prevent Gun Violence. The folks there are, unsurprisingly, apoplectic at the week's events. A Republican-dominated Congress that has done nothing to stop gun trafficking on the Mexican border all of sudden is concerned enough about gun trafficking on the Mexican border to quickly hold contempt hearings and a floor vote?

The Brady Campaign is smart to denounce the program -- it was, indeed, indefensible. But the gun-control advocates counsel a little bit of perspective. The Brady Campaign contends that the "Fast and Furious" program involved about 2,000 firearms crossing the border into Mexico, about 3 percent of the guns moving from U.S. gun shops to Mexico in the last four years. The center's Denis Henigan wants House Republicans, the ones chasing Eric Holder, to focus instead upon the other 97 percent of those guns. Henigan wrote:

Two years ago, Mexican President Calderon told a Joint Session of Congress that the drug cartels in his country were exploiting weak American gun laws to amass their arsenals; indeed, he said the escalation of Mexican drug violence "coincides with the lifting of the assault weapons ban in 2004." President Calderon told the Congress of his understanding that the purpose of the Second Amendment "is to guarantee good American citizens the ability to defend themselves and their Nation." "But believe me," he added, "many of these guns are not going to honest American hands."

Since his address, it has become even clearer that Mexican crime guns are originating in American gun shops. Last month, the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives released its most recent data showing that, in the last five years, more than 68,000 crime guns were recovered in Mexico and traced back to the United States. The guns that "walked" across the border under the "Fast and Furious" operation constitute less than 3% of those guns. Where is Speaker Boehner's concern about the other 97%?

Not only has the Republican House majority done nothing to stem the trafficking of guns to Mexico; it has acted to block the modest efforts of the Obama Administration to address the problem. The House twice has voted to block continued implementation of the Administration's regulatory requirement that multiple sales of semi-automatic rifles in the border states be promptly reported to ATF to give the law enforcers real-time notice of the suspicious gun sales that are feeding the cartels.

Given that "Fast and Furious" has been rightly criticized for allowing guns to "walk" to Mexico, it seems odd that House Republicans would object to a regulation that is enabling ATF to better stop trafficked guns before they get to the border and to arrest the traffickers.

Dan Gross, the president of the Brady Campaign, was even more blunt. He told me Friday morning via email:

This is the ultimate hypocrisy. Lives are being lost every day because of the actions these same members of Congress refuse to take. It's just shameful. The American people need to hold them accountable. There is plenty [House Oversight Committee Chairman Darrell] Issa and others in Congress could do to keep guns out of the hands of dangerous people and actually save lives. They instead choose to perpetuate divisive party politics and the gun lobby's dark agenda. No wonder their approval rating is low.

None of this rancor excuses the poor judgment -- across two administrations -- which generated the program itself. And none of it justifies the burgeoning political battle over the scope of the documents the Republicans want Holder to hand over. Like so much else about Washington's ruined politics these days, the partisan shouting will escalate, ribbons of blame will be laid, vast amounts of time and money will be spent, and the real problem will go unsolved. That's a scandal, too, no?

http://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2012/06/the-real-scandal-of-fast-and-furious/258844/

joyfree
by Kat on Jun. 23, 2012 at 12:27 AM

clappingI like it!

imagirlgeek
by Bronze Member on Jun. 23, 2012 at 1:00 AM
2 moms liked this

Again, this is all wrong.  Are ya'll just now hearing about this?  This whole thing blew up in 2011 (which is not an election year).  If someone needs to be blamed for letting it go into an election year, that's on Holder.  

Over 2000 guns were 'walked' during F&F.  Less than 700 have been recovered.  Are you saying that Congress should be going after average people in the U.S. who are buying legal guns instead of investigating guns that were sold to criminals purposely by the U.S. Government?  Is that what you are saying?  

This isn't just a little 'oops' moment.  This is bad.



Quoting 1bluediamond:



House Republicans have resorted to partisan finger-pointing over 3 percent of the guns crossing the border -- and ignored the other 97 percent.

The Real Scandal of Fast and Furious

Actually, despite silly headlines like this, it's not a complicated story at all. Operation Fast and Furious -- hey, let's give guns to bad guys, what could possibly go wrong? -- was a bad idea, poorly done, and thus not unlike hundreds or thousands of other poorly conceived and executed government plans of recent memory. (Like the Iraq War, for example). The Obama Administration, like the Bush Administration before it, deserves no small measure of blame for thinking that such a dangerous, unwieldy sting could be completed, successfully, without a great deal of unintended pain and sorrow.

To the right, the story has been an election-year blessing, a roiling melange of: (1) gun righteousness; (2) antipathy toward Holder, and; (3) fear and loathing of Mexico and Mexicans. When Colbert mocks the vast "conspiracy" the right sees in all of this -- what's the matter, good old-fashioned bureaucratic incompetence isn't good enough anymore? -- it's hilariously funny until you realize that tens of millions of people evidently believe the plot to be true. "If I lie in a lawsuit involving the fate of my neighbor's cow, I can go to jail," Walter Lippmann wrote in 1919:

But if I lie to a million readers in a matter involving war and peace, I can lie my head off, and, if I choose the right series of lies, be entirely irresponsible.

As I've followed the story -- and so much of it has been told so well by my CBS News colleagueSharyl Attkisson -- I keep thinking about the mission and the frustrations of the Brady Campaign To Prevent Gun Violence. The folks there are, unsurprisingly, apoplectic at the week's events. A Republican-dominated Congress that has done nothing to stop gun trafficking on the Mexican border all of sudden is concerned enough about gun trafficking on the Mexican border to quickly hold contempt hearings and a floor vote?

The Brady Campaign is smart to denounce the program -- it was, indeed, indefensible. But the gun-control advocates counsel a little bit of perspective. The Brady Campaign contends that the "Fast and Furious" program involved about 2,000 firearms crossing the border into Mexico, about 3 percent of the guns moving from U.S. gun shops to Mexico in the last four years. The center's Denis Henigan wants House Republicans, the ones chasing Eric Holder, to focus instead upon the other 97 percent of those guns. Henigan wrote:

Two years ago, Mexican President Calderon told a Joint Session of Congress that the drug cartels in his country were exploiting weak American gun laws to amass their arsenals; indeed, he said the escalation of Mexican drug violence "coincides with the lifting of the assault weapons ban in 2004." President Calderon told the Congress of his understanding that the purpose of the Second Amendment "is to guarantee good American citizens the ability to defend themselves and their Nation." "But believe me," he added, "many of these guns are not going to honest American hands."

Since his address, it has become even clearer that Mexican crime guns are originating in American gun shops. Last month, the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives released its most recent data showing that, in the last five years, more than 68,000 crime guns were recovered in Mexico and traced back to the United States. The guns that "walked" across the border under the "Fast and Furious" operation constitute less than 3% of those guns. Where is Speaker Boehner's concern about the other 97%?

Not only has the Republican House majority done nothing to stem the trafficking of guns to Mexico; it has acted to block the modest efforts of the Obama Administration to address the problem. The House twice has voted to block continued implementation of the Administration's regulatory requirement that multiple sales of semi-automatic rifles in the border states be promptly reported to ATF to give the law enforcers real-time notice of the suspicious gun sales that are feeding the cartels.

Given that "Fast and Furious" has been rightly criticized for allowing guns to "walk" to Mexico, it seems odd that House Republicans would object to a regulation that is enabling ATF to better stop trafficked guns before they get to the border and to arrest the traffickers.

Dan Gross, the president of the Brady Campaign, was even more blunt. He told me Friday morning via email:

This is the ultimate hypocrisy. Lives are being lost every day because of the actions these same members of Congress refuse to take. It's just shameful. The American people need to hold them accountable. There is plenty [House Oversight Committee Chairman Darrell] Issa and others in Congress could do to keep guns out of the hands of dangerous people and actually save lives. They instead choose to perpetuate divisive party politics and the gun lobby's dark agenda. No wonder their approval rating is low.

None of this rancor excuses the poor judgment -- across two administrations -- which generated the program itself. And none of it justifies the burgeoning political battle over the scope of the documents the Republicans want Holder to hand over. Like so much else about Washington's ruined politics these days, the partisan shouting will escalate, ribbons of blame will be laid, vast amounts of time and money will be spent, and the real problem will go unsolved. That's a scandal, too, no?

http://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2012/06/the-real-scandal-of-fast-and-furious/258844/


--------------------------------------------
You don't have to be judgmental and be like "Oh, he's using his freedom the wrong way!  I want him to use his freedom the way I use my freedom!"  You can't do that. You have to be tolerant.  People say "Oh no, you can't be tolerant. What if they do something you don't like?" Tolerance does not mean endorsement.  -- Ron Paul
Carpy
by Platinum Member on Jun. 23, 2012 at 7:47 AM

Thiis scandal will soon top the media headlines.  The MSM's support of Obama will give way to the headlines because they won't want to be left in the dirt on a huge story.

nanaofsix531
by Platinum Member on Jun. 23, 2012 at 8:39 AM
1 mom liked this

Carpy
by Platinum Member on Jun. 23, 2012 at 12:45 PM
1 mom liked this
Yep let's brush aside the fact that Bushs program had the cooperation of the Mexican government, tracers and was shut down when it was determined that the tracer were not working. Allof which were not even part of fasr and furious.

Quoting nanaofsix531:

Posted on CafeMom Mobile
Friday
by Platinum Member on Jun. 23, 2012 at 12:54 PM

Issa is an opportunistic, power hungry putz. He started the Cali recall because he wanted to be gov and we got stuck with Aaahhnuld. I put nothing past Issa, wouldn't surprise me if he was aware and involved the whole time and now feigning innocence so the right can go after Obama.

I'm not saying I support Obama on this situation or think his admin is innocent but Issa is no innocent either.

 


Thank God......it's Friday!!!

imagirlgeek
by Bronze Member on Jun. 23, 2012 at 1:41 PM
1 mom liked this

You're going off track.  There have been lots of operations over the years.  Some under Bush, some under Obama.  I wouldn't be surprised if this stuff has been going on even longer than both of those administrations.  The problem is that Operation Fast and Furious (specifically) is the one that got screwed up and people died.  People were killed because of negligence.  Don't you want to know who was responsible, how it happened, and guarantees that it will never happen again?  

Here is a cspan video showing a press conference where the program was announced, if you are interested.  It's not as witty as Colburn, but still informative.  http://www.c-spanvideo.org/program/MexicoBor

And here's a link to an article that references Holder 'inadvertantly' claiming that the previous AG had been briefed on this gunwalking operation. WashingtonTimes Holder has now retracted his statement that Bush's AG knew about it.

Don't get me wrong.  If evidence comes out that multiple people across multiple administrations were responsible for what happened, they should ALL be held accountable.  I'm not going to pick and choose who gets in trouble for this.  But trying to ridicule anyone who wants the truth isn't going to help anything.  Sweeping it under the rug is not a solution.

Quoting nanaofsix531:


--------------------------------------------
You don't have to be judgmental and be like "Oh, he's using his freedom the wrong way!  I want him to use his freedom the way I use my freedom!"  You can't do that. You have to be tolerant.  People say "Oh no, you can't be tolerant. What if they do something you don't like?" Tolerance does not mean endorsement.  -- Ron Paul
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