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2 Million Families Could Go Hungry Soon - Do you or anyone else you know rely on SNAP to feed your family?

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2 Million Families Could Go Hungry Soon, Thanks to Congress

Posted by Adriana Velez on July 12, 2012

empty plateIf House Republicans have their way, millions of Americans are going to go hungry over the next 10 years. The Farm Bill has been making its way through the halls of Capital Hill -- quietly, because it's called the FARM Bill and most of us think it doesn't have anything to do with us. So nobody is paying attention.

But about 80 percent of the Farm Bill is actually all about food stamps and other hunger programs. And the funding for those programs is about to get slashed in a huge way. If you're on food stamps now, get ready to tighten your belts even more. Kids getting free or reduced lunch at school? That could end for them, too.

The Senate version of the bill has already passed. They voted to cut $4.5 billion from the food stamps program now called SNAP. That would mean about 500,000 households a year would lose $90 per month in SNAP benefits. 

But that's just the Senate version. The House version gets even worse. The House Agriculture Committee is proposing $16.5 billion in cuts. Almost FOUR TIMES the cuts in the Senate bill. They'll vote on it soon.

Connecticut Democrat Rep. Rosa DeLauro says that means between two and three million people would completely lose their benefits. About 300,000 kids would not get free school lunches.

You know who suffers the most from SNAP cuts? Children. Three quarters of SNAP participants are families with children. (And a quarter of them have a senior citizen or disabled person in the household.) 

It's scary how many people have gone on food stamps since the recession began in 2007. It means people just aren't making ends meet and they need help. Obviously we want the economy to improve enough so that people can get off of assistance -- but we're putting the cart before the horse here, taking away benefits before we see enough jobs for everyone. So why are we making it harder for parents to feed their children? It just doesn't make sense to me. 

By the way, a quick PSA video below just to refresh your memory on how a bill becomes a law. There's still time to stop the madness if you contact your Representatives. And read more about other families who could be affected by these cuts.


Do you or anyone else you know rely on SNAP to feed your family?

by on Jul. 12, 2012 at 2:13 PM
Replies (121-130):
1Giovanni
by Bronze Member on Jul. 13, 2012 at 12:35 PM

That is not that way in Oregon. My husband took a cut 2 years ago, so others wouldn't be laid off. He is in Construction. He has been looking for non union jobs but no one will hire him because of his age. That is why he has to stay in the union, because they don't go by age, but by what number he is on the list.


Quoting erika9009:

I am talking about members too. 

I'm not sure about your area, but here in CA, the unions get the upper hand so to speak.  For example, some stimulus was used to cover pension and salaries shortfalls in many state and local gov.  I sure didn't see any of that going to HP, Dell, Southwest Airlines to cover their salaries.  They just laid off people or in HP case, told everyone they get a 10% pay cut.

Sorry you husband cannot find work.  What does he do?  You never know if there is someone I know that could help out.

Quoting 1Giovanni:

Are you talking about the union workers or the big guys in the unions? If you are talking about the union workers you are so wrong. lol. My husband is union and hasn't worked since October.

But if you are talking about the head of the unions, I agree with you.

Quoting erika9009:

I am concerned, but how many of these families would not need to be on food stamps if Pres Obama had a working economic policy that created jobs for all, not just his buddies in the unions?




-Eilish-
by Johnson 2012 on Jul. 13, 2012 at 12:39 PM

:D I can of course respect that - home is home. BUUUUUUT - necessity is still the mother of invention. My friends mother has a little saying - "you'd like it or else you'd change it."

Quoting mehamil1:

I have no where else to go. My entire family lives here as do almost all of my friends. I'm 7th generation on my dad's side in this city. I'm a tad attached to it. I can only support those who are trying to change it. But this place is my home. I don't want to leave. Chicago is as corrupt as they get, but damnit, those streets are clean! (that's a Chicago phrase)

Quoting -Eilish-:

Chicago's a tough one for sure. If it were me (and I'm not saying this is a solution for everyone) I'd move. Chicago's politics are sociopathic in nature - they need the people dependent on them.




mehamil1
by on Jul. 13, 2012 at 12:57 PM

You should read Guns, Germs, and Steel. It's a book about why some cultures developed the way they did while others stayed as hunter/gathers or didn't (or did) develop technology. Takes on that phrase, necessity is the mother of invention. 

Also, there's a lot that I don't like and the only way to change it is to change how I react to it. But we are all different. You have type A personalities who will steam roll over everything. Then there's more passive people like me. We are all different and even when we don't like something, we won't change it until we either get sick of it and are ready for a change. I'm not ready for a change. Especially since my son is young (he's 8). Leaving would mean losing my whole support structure. It truly does take a village. And I'm a single mom. 

Quoting -Eilish-:

:D I can of course respect that - home is home. BUUUUUUT - necessity is still the mother of invention. My friends mother has a little saying - "you'd like it or else you'd change it."

Quoting mehamil1:

I have no where else to go. My entire family lives here as do almost all of my friends. I'm 7th generation on my dad's side in this city. I'm a tad attached to it. I can only support those who are trying to change it. But this place is my home. I don't want to leave. Chicago is as corrupt as they get, but damnit, those streets are clean! (that's a Chicago phrase)

Quoting -Eilish-:

Chicago's a tough one for sure. If it were me (and I'm not saying this is a solution for everyone) I'd move. Chicago's politics are sociopathic in nature - they need the people dependent on them.


-Eilish-
by Johnson 2012 on Jul. 13, 2012 at 1:15 PM

I'll check it out. And maybe leaving isn't right for you. My point is that if you want/need something bad enough, you'll make it happen. Obviously there are people that will try and stop you, and I'm not saying that they won't stand in your way, but even with Type A personalities (which I am not, I'm much more passive), standing up against them is possible. (My kids are 6 and younger btw - so I get it).

Quoting mehamil1:

You should read Guns, Germs, and Steel. It's a book about why some cultures developed the way they did while others stayed as hunter/gathers or didn't (or did) develop technology. Takes on that phrase, necessity is the mother of invention. 

Also, there's a lot that I don't like and the only way to change it is to change how I react to it. But we are all different. You have type A personalities who will steam roll over everything. Then there's more passive people like me. We are all different and even when we don't like something, we won't change it until we either get sick of it and are ready for a change. I'm not ready for a change. Especially since my son is young (he's 8). Leaving would mean losing my whole support structure. It truly does take a village. And I'm a single mom. 

Quoting -Eilish-:

:D I can of course respect that - home is home. BUUUUUUT - necessity is still the mother of invention. My friends mother has a little saying - "you'd like it or else you'd change it."

Quoting mehamil1:

I have no where else to go. My entire family lives here as do almost all of my friends. I'm 7th generation on my dad's side in this city. I'm a tad attached to it. I can only support those who are trying to change it. But this place is my home. I don't want to leave. Chicago is as corrupt as they get, but damnit, those streets are clean! (that's a Chicago phrase)

Quoting -Eilish-:

Chicago's a tough one for sure. If it were me (and I'm not saying this is a solution for everyone) I'd move. Chicago's politics are sociopathic in nature - they need the people dependent on them.




shimamab
by on Jul. 13, 2012 at 1:29 PM
While I'm sure that there are "lazy" people and "enablers" gaming the system, my comment was meant to point out that not all people are in the position to grow their own food. Even though some nice mamas who know more about this subject than I do have shown me how little area is needed, I still have some concerns (albeit less than I started with) about the feasibility of home grown food in our modern society.

Quoting dl42272:

Lazy people will always find an excuse as to why they can't support themselves. If they can't, their enablers will.


Quoting shimamab:

That would be great if everyone owned land to garden on. Many poor are in inner cities and I doubt a sustainable garden can be grown on concrete. A quick google search gave anywhere from 1/4-2 acres per person as the adequate space needed to feed a family.


Posted on CafeMom Mobile
mehamil1
by on Jul. 13, 2012 at 1:34 PM
1 mom liked this

I'm glad you understand. 

I think all of your ideas are great and I hope one day they are implemented. If more people knew how to grow their own food and cultivate and take care of the land they are on, we wouldn't be so deep into this predicament.

My mother usually grows tomatoes and cucumbers. However, our dog Paulie is an asshole and keeps eating the plants. And my mother will not hear of trading him in for a dog that doesn't. Well, could you give this face away? It doesn't help that he's super affectionate and is attached to my mom something fierce.

 

Quoting -Eilish-:

I'll check it out. And maybe leaving isn't right for you. My point is that if you want/need something bad enough, you'll make it happen. Obviously there are people that will try and stop you, and I'm not saying that they won't stand in your way, but even with Type A personalities (which I am not, I'm much more passive), standing up against them is possible. (My kids are 6 and younger btw - so I get it).

Quoting mehamil1:

You should read Guns, Germs, and Steel. It's a book about why some cultures developed the way they did while others stayed as hunter/gathers or didn't (or did) develop technology. Takes on that phrase, necessity is the mother of invention. 

Also, there's a lot that I don't like and the only way to change it is to change how I react to it. But we are all different. You have type A personalities who will steam roll over everything. Then there's more passive people like me. We are all different and even when we don't like something, we won't change it until we either get sick of it and are ready for a change. I'm not ready for a change. Especially since my son is young (he's 8). Leaving would mean losing my whole support structure. It truly does take a village. And I'm a single mom. 

Quoting -Eilish-:

:D I can of course respect that - home is home. BUUUUUUT - necessity is still the mother of invention. My friends mother has a little saying - "you'd like it or else you'd change it." 


mehamil1
by on Jul. 13, 2012 at 1:43 PM

And it's not even about laziness. It's about lack of access to resources. That's what it comes down too. Growing your own food is a resource that too many poor people do not have access to. Among other things. Like jobs that pay a living wage and the transport means to get there. Chicago is notorious for making it stupid hard for poor people to get jobs. An entire highway was constructed to keep poor people where they are (on the southside). Only one train line goes to the southside (the red line) that goes to where most of the good paying jobs are (the northside). In some areas, like the south west side, there is no reliable public transport to go anywhere. Also, cars are stupid expensive to have in this city. People are taxed for having them something fierce. So in a lot of ways, too many people are stuck where they are. You cannot walk from the southwest side of Chicago to the north side where the good paying jobs are. This city's area is a total of over 250 square miles. It's a good 100 miles from the southwest side to the north side. No one can walk that. People need reliable transportation. 

This has been a huge problem in this city that has yet to be fixed because the city refuses to extend the CTA (Chicago transit authority) to these areas. So the people who are there rely on Social welfare programs just to get by. That will not change until the city changes the infrastructure and allows investment into these areas (they are red lined in real estate, no developer or business owner can get a loan to open a business there, this is done by zip code). 

It sucks. And it's not about laziness. it's about access and an unwillingness to help people get out of the situation they are in. Primarily due to racism. 

Quoting shimamab:

While I'm sure that there are "lazy" people and "enablers" gaming the system, my comment was meant to point out that not all people are in the position to grow their own food. Even though some nice mamas who know more about this subject than I do have shown me how little area is needed, I still have some concerns (albeit less than I started with) about the feasibility of home grown food in our modern society.
Quoting dl42272:

Lazy people will always find an excuse as to why they can't support themselves. If they can't, their enablers will.

Quoting shimamab:

That would be great if everyone owned land to garden on. Many poor are in inner cities and I doubt a sustainable garden can be grown on concrete. A quick google search gave anywhere from 1/4-2 acres per person as the adequate space needed to feed a family.


shimamab
by on Jul. 13, 2012 at 1:48 PM
I agree that it's generally not about laziness but since dl42272 made a comment about it and it is some of the problem, I didn't just want to gloss over it.

I've known hard working people who needed temp help from time to time and others who took all they could without regard to where it came from. Just like any other statistical group, there are all kinds of peeps both "good" and "bad".


Quoting mehamil1:

And it's not even about laziness. It's about lack of access to resources. That's what it comes down too. Growing your own food is a resource that too many poor people do not have access to. Among other things. Like jobs that pay a living wage and the transport means to get there. Chicago is notorious for making it stupid hard for poor people to get jobs. An entire highway was constructed to keep poor people where they are (on the southside). Only one train line goes to the southside (the red line) that goes to where most of the good paying jobs are (the northside). In some areas, like the south west side, there is no reliable public transport to go anywhere. Also, cars are stupid expensive to have in this city. People are taxed for having them something fierce. So in a lot of ways, too many people are stuck where they are. You cannot walk from the southwest side of Chicago to the north side where the good paying jobs are. This city's area is a total of over 250 square miles. It's a good 100 miles from the southwest side to the north side. No one can walk that. People need reliable transportation. 

This has been a huge problem in this city that has yet to be fixed because the city refuses to extend the CTA (Chicago transit authority) to these areas. So the people who are there rely on Social welfare programs just to get by. That will not change until the city changes the infrastructure and allows investment into these areas (they are red lined in real estate, no developer or business owner can get a loan to open a business there, this is done by zip code). 

It sucks. And it's not about laziness. it's about access and an unwillingness to help people get out of the situation they are in. Primarily due to racism. 


Quoting shimamab:

While I'm sure that there are "lazy" people and "enablers" gaming the system, my comment was meant to point out that not all people are in the position to grow their own food. Even though some nice mamas who know more about this subject than I do have shown me how little area is needed, I still have some concerns (albeit less than I started with) about the feasibility of home grown food in our modern society.

Quoting dl42272:

Lazy people will always find an excuse as to why they can't support themselves. If they can't, their enablers will.

Quoting shimamab:

That would be great if everyone owned land to garden on. Many poor are in inner cities and I doubt a sustainable garden can be grown on concrete. A quick google search gave anywhere from 1/4-2 acres per person as the adequate space needed to feed a family.


Posted on CafeMom Mobile
mehamil1
by on Jul. 13, 2012 at 1:55 PM
1 mom liked this

I know. I just witnessed a friend of mine who made a post on facebook asking if anyone is selling their link cards this month. I quite literally hit myself in the head. 

Is that the standard? No. Offical stats support that. But the media, espeiaclly the conservative media, paints it that way. That most of them are free loading lazy asses. It plays into the divide and conquer rhetoric. Get people fighting over the stupidest shit while the elite rob us blind. 

Quoting shimamab:

I agree that it's generally not about laziness but since dl42272 made a comment about it and it is some of the problem, I didn't just want to gloss over it.

I've known hard working people who needed temp help from time to time and others who took all they could without regard to where it came from. Just like any other statistical group, there are all kinds of peeps both "good" and "bad".

Quoting mehamil1:

And it's not even about laziness. It's about lack of access to resources. That's what it comes down too. Growing your own food is a resource that too many poor people do not have access to. Among other things. Like jobs that pay a living wage and the transport means to get there. Chicago is notorious for making it stupid hard for poor people to get jobs. An entire highway was constructed to keep poor people where they are (on the southside). Only one train line goes to the southside (the red line) that goes to where most of the good paying jobs are (the northside). In some areas, like the south west side, there is no reliable public transport to go anywhere. Also, cars are stupid expensive to have in this city. People are taxed for having them something fierce. So in a lot of ways, too many people are stuck where they are. You cannot walk from the southwest side of Chicago to the north side where the good paying jobs are. This city's area is a total of over 250 square miles. It's a good 100 miles from the southwest side to the north side. No one can walk that. People need reliable transportation. 

This has been a huge problem in this city that has yet to be fixed because the city refuses to extend the CTA (Chicago transit authority) to these areas. So the people who are there rely on Social welfare programs just to get by. That will not change until the city changes the infrastructure and allows investment into these areas (they are red lined in real estate, no developer or business owner can get a loan to open a business there, this is done by zip code). 

It sucks. And it's not about laziness. it's about access and an unwillingness to help people get out of the situation they are in. Primarily due to racism. 

Quoting shimamab:

While I'm sure that there are "lazy" people and "enablers" gaming the system, my comment was meant to point out that not all people are in the position to grow their own food. Even though some nice mamas who know more about this subject than I do have shown me how little area is needed, I still have some concerns (albeit less than I started with) about the feasibility of home grown food in our modern society.


dl42272
by on Jul. 13, 2012 at 2:06 PM

No, not all of it is laziness. But, too many do not do all they can to take care of their families. While we may not want to, people have come to where they know that they can fall back on the entitlements. Therefore, we don't try as hard as we can.

When my 1st husband died, leaving me with our 2 kids, I did things that I didn't think I could because I had to - my kids needed me.

Quoting shimamab:

I agree that it's generally not about laziness but since dl42272 made a comment about it and it is some of the problem, I didn't just want to gloss over it.

I've known hard working people who needed temp help from time to time and others who took all they could without regard to where it came from. Just like any other statistical group, there are all kinds of peeps both "good" and "bad".



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