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News & Politics News & Politics

Promoting the General Welfare

Posted by on Nov. 15, 2012 at 8:15 AM
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1 mom liked this

http://american_almanac.tripod.com/welfare.htm

 
 
``We the People of the United States, in Order to form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common Defense, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of America.''

The commitment to promote the general welfare of all persons, as opposed to protecting the interests of a narrow section or class of the population, encapsulates what is most unique about the United States of America--that it is the only modern nation-state republic founded on this principle.

Lyndon LaRouche has identified the principle of the general welfare as the only legitimate basis for the authority of government. A useful summary may be found, for example, in LaRouche's article, ``Will the U.S.A. keep its sovereignty?'' published in the November 19, 1999 issue of Executive Intelligence Review.

LaRouche emphasizes that our United States republic ``came into existence as direct heir of those anti-oligarchichal, anti-Roman, Platonic principles of natural law'' which were first affirmed in the founding of the first nation-state republics during the late 15th Century: France under Louis XI, and England under Henry VII. LaRouche describes the source of this law as ``a combination of the Classical Greek, republican heritage, with those doctrines, respecting the universal notion of human individuality, which were promulgated by Jesus Christ and his Apostles, notably the Epistles of the Apostle Paul.''

Out of this, came the central principle upon which ``the authority, powers, and responsibilities of the sovereign nation-state republic were premised ... the notion of `general welfare,' or commonwealth.'

``The authority of the sovereign state lies solely in its indispensable role in promoting the general welfare of all persons, as Genesis I, and the Christian apostolic mission define all persons, as made equally in the image of the Creator of the Universe, and thus equally subjects of the obligation to promote the welfare of both the living and their posterity,'' LaRouche wrote, adding that, ``Only sovereign government has the means to promote the conditions of the general welfare respecting all of the people and all of the land-area, both for the living and future generations,'' and that thus, the existence of such sovereign nation-state republics is shown to be ``the morally required condition of mankind.''

This stands in opposition to those forms of oligarchical rule, in which the government is the private property of a ruling oligarchy, either a feudalistic, landed oligarchy, or a financier oligarchy of the sort that the British monarchy represents today. In such cases, governments exist to preserve the power and wealth of such oligarchies, and not to promote the general welfare of all citizens.

From the original colonizations of the Americas, those two outlooks have been in conflict; they are perhaps best expressed in the contrast between the Massachusetts Bay Colony of the Winthrops and Mathers, versus the Carolina colonies, whose constitution, written by John Locke, created a hereditary nobility, and ensured the primacy of property, including slave property.

What we shall do here, is to trace how the General Welfare clause became such a crucial element of the Constitution, looking back, both to the early colonial period, and then examining what the concept meant to the Founding Fathers (notably Alexander Hamilton), and others who shaped the political and economic life of the republic in the early 18th Century. Finally, we shall see the triumph of the Hamiltonian notion of the general welfare during the fight over President Franklin Delano Roosevelt's New Deal in the 1930s.

Today, that commitment has been largely abandoned, both among ``New Democrats'' of the Al Gore type, and among the dominant grouping among Republicans, whose radical free-market policies stand in the utmost contrast to the Lincolnesque principles on which the Republican Party was once based.

by on Nov. 15, 2012 at 8:15 AM
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SallyMJ
by Ruby Member on Nov. 15, 2012 at 10:25 AM
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Well, I can tell you this, when the Founders used the term "general welfare" in the preamble to the Constitution, they did not at all envision taxpayers funding everything from the huge welfare state, to ridiculous scientific studies of issues we already know the answers to, or are irrelevent to the American people. 

blues_pagan
by on Nov. 15, 2012 at 10:26 AM

No but they did recognize the need to care for one another and not invest our country totally into capitalistic ideals.

Quoting SallyMJ:

Well, I can tell you this, when the Founders used the term "the general welfare" in the preamble to the Constitution, they did not at all envision taxpayers funding everything from the huge welfare state, to ridiculous scientific studies of issues we already know the answers to, or are irrelevent to the American people. 


SallyMJ
by Ruby Member on Nov. 15, 2012 at 10:45 AM
3 moms liked this

Conservatives' perspective in long term aid involves looking at the whole picture of what is in the best interest of the person.

And even philanthropist Bono recently said he has learned that capitalism is a good thing in helping people.

'The Irish singer and co-founder of ONE, a campaigning group that fights poverty and disease in Africa, said it had been “a humbling thing for me” to realize the importance of capitalism and entrepreneurialism in philanthropy, particularly as someone who “got into this as a righteous anger activist with all the cliches.”'

'“Job creators and innovators are just the key, and aid is just a bridge,” he told an audience of 200 leading technology entrepreneurs and investors at the F.ounders tech conference in Dublin. “We see it as startup money, investment in new countries. A humbling thing was to learn the role of commerce.”'


http://www.forbes.com/sites/parmyolson/2012/10/22/bonos-humbling-realizations-about-aid-capitalism-and-nerds/

Quoting blues_pagan:

No but they did recognize the need to care for one another and not invest our country totally into capitalistic ideals.

Quoting SallyMJ:

Well, I can tell you this, when the Founders used the term "the general welfare" in the preamble to the Constitution, they did not at all envision taxpayers funding everything from the huge welfare state, to ridiculous scientific studies of issues we already know the answers to, or are irrelevent to the American people. 



buttersworth
by Bronze Member on Nov. 15, 2012 at 8:40 PM
1 mom liked this

As congressman Ron Paul recently pointed to, there is for some, a focus on free market but without equal emphasis on civil liberties.

The reason for this seems logical and obvious. Free markets create gain for the oligarchs.

Furthermore I would speculate that free markets may even mean de-regulation for industries in areas where regulations have generally protected  the people from abuse or harm in some way. This of course makes no sense to anyone who is not aware of the historical tradition of oligarchs always having acted as though feeling threatened by being out-numbered. In this case the general welfare is only considered insomuch as circumstances do not cause insurrection, thus the quote (erroneously attributed to Marie Antoinette) of "let them eat cake". Which, whoever actually said it or manufactured it, was saying something that is very relevant in regard to the general welfare today.

Our system currently resembles an oligarchy, at least in practice. In theory, of course, we are technically still a republic. I think many Americans wrongly believe they live in a democratic country, and those tend to champion majority rule, not understanding the implications of that being detrimental to individual civil liberties - perhaps even their own. The general welfare is not necessarilly maintained by majority rule, which I think Thomas Jefferson believed as well when he asserted that uneducated men needed representatives in congress to stand up for their best interest.

The point I am getting from your post, if I may add this in my own words,  is that the democratic party is not a champion for individual sovereignty and the republican party is corrupt as well, being a pundit only for the rights of free markets. 

143myboys9496
by Gold Member on Nov. 15, 2012 at 9:02 PM
2 moms liked this

 Or dopping a million+ dollars to finding the best beef jerky..

Quoting SallyMJ:

Well, I can tell you this, when the Founders used the term "general welfare" in the preamble to the Constitution, they did not at all envision taxpayers funding everything from the huge welfare state, to ridiculous scientific studies of issues we already know the answers to, or are irrelevent to the American people. 

 

SallyMJ
by Ruby Member on Nov. 15, 2012 at 9:38 PM

Isn't the best beef jerkey, turkey jerkey? :)

Quoting 143myboys9496:

 Or dopping a million+ dollars to finding the best beef jerky..

Quoting SallyMJ:

Well, I can tell you this, when the Founders used the term "general welfare" in the preamble to the Constitution, they did not at all envision taxpayers funding everything from the huge welfare state, to ridiculous scientific studies of issues we already know the answers to, or are irrelevent to the American people. 

 


143myboys9496
by Gold Member on Nov. 15, 2012 at 10:20 PM
1 mom liked this
We'll have to see what the research our million dollars funded finds out. Lol

Quoting SallyMJ:

Isn't the best beef jerkey, turkey jerkey? :)



Quoting 143myboys9496:

 Or dopping a million+ dollars to finding the best beef jerky..



Quoting SallyMJ:



Well, I can tell you this, when the Founders used the term "general welfare" in the preamble to the Constitution, they did not at all envision taxpayers funding everything from the huge welfare state, to ridiculous scientific studies of issues we already know the answers to, or are irrelevent to the American people. 



 


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SallyMJ
by Ruby Member on Nov. 15, 2012 at 10:48 PM
1 mom liked this

I just found out that was a real study costing millions. I bet if you or I had a red pen, we could singlehandedly save bilions of dollars just crossing things off that are completely unnecessary.

Quoting 143myboys9496:

We'll have to see what the research our million dollars funded finds out. Lol

Quoting SallyMJ:

Isn't the best beef jerkey, turkey jerkey? :)



Quoting 143myboys9496:

 Or dopping a million+ dollars to finding the best beef jerky..



Quoting SallyMJ:



Well, I can tell you this, when the Founders used the term "general welfare" in the preamble to the Constitution, they did not at all envision taxpayers funding everything from the huge welfare state, to ridiculous scientific studies of issues we already know the answers to, or are irrelevent to the American people. 



 



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