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Reelecting Obama Is Like....

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by on Nov. 16, 2012 at 6:27 PM
Replies (31-40):
lnicole
by Member on Nov. 16, 2012 at 9:00 PM

 Maybe they should, but their families who are ACTUALLY legal immigrants, vote and better and you better believe it wasn't for R.

Quoting mom2twinboyz:

 

NO NOT IMMIGRANTS!! ILLEGAL IMMIGRANTS! There is a huge difference. Those who shouldn't be here should self deport.

Quoting lnicole:

 It's like saying you wish immigrants would self deport, then are surprised when you lose 70% of their vote.

 

 

mom2twinboyz
by Bronze Member on Nov. 16, 2012 at 9:07 PM

 

Right, it gives them the RIGHT to sue for discrimination. It doesn't demand companies pay women equally. Again big difference.

Quoting lnicole:

 

The Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act of 2009 (Pub.L. 111-2, S. 181) is a federal statute in the United States that was the first bill signed into law by President Barack Obama on January 29, 2009. The Act amends the Civil Rights Act of 1964. The new act states that the 180-day statute of limitations for filing an equal-pay lawsuit regarding pay discrimination resets with each new paycheck affected by that discriminatory action. The law directly addressed Ledbetter v. Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co., 550 U.S. 618 (2007), a U.S. Supreme Court decision that the statute of limitations for presenting an equal-pay lawsuit begins on the date that the employer makes the initial discriminatory wage decision, not at the date of the most recent paycheck.

A bill, also called the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act, to supersede the decision, was introduced in the 110th United States Congress but was never enacted, as it was passed by the House but failed in the Senate.

During the campaign for the 2008 elections, the Democrats criticized Republicans for defeating the 2007 version of the bill, citing Republican presidential candidate John McCain's opposition to the bill and candidate Barack Obama's support.[1]

The antecedents of the case were posed when Lilly Ledbetter, a production supervisor at a Goodyear tire plant in Alabama, filed an equal-pay lawsuit regarding pay discrimination under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, six months before her early retirement in 1998.

Was she discriminated against? yes.  Was she a woman? yes  Did the republicans attempt to block it? yes again.

Quoting mom2twinboyz:

 

Lily LedBetter (or Bedwetter) was not about equal pay at all. All it gave was a right to be sue happy. Purly benefitting corrupt lawyers.

Quoting lnicole:

 It's like saying you sign a bill to make abortion illegal and don't support equal pay for women then your surprised you lose most of the female vote.

 

 


lnicole
by Member on Nov. 16, 2012 at 9:12 PM

 I know what it does..and I know what the bill is....the main question is why would anyone NOT support it?  If someone is being discriminated against they should have that right.  Discrimination is NOT legal.

Quoting mom2twinboyz:

 

Right, it gives them the RIGHT to sue for discrimination. It doesn't demand companies pay women equally. Again big difference.

Quoting lnicole:

 

The Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act of 2009 (Pub.L. 111-2, S. 181) is a federal statute in the United States that was the first bill signed into law by President Barack Obama on January 29, 2009. The Act amends the Civil Rights Act of 1964. The new act states that the 180-day statute of limitations for filing an equal-pay lawsuit regarding pay discrimination resets with each new paycheck affected by that discriminatory action. The law directly addressed Ledbetter v. Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co., 550 U.S. 618 (2007), a U.S. Supreme Court decision that the statute of limitations for presenting an equal-pay lawsuit begins on the date that the employer makes the initial discriminatory wage decision, not at the date of the most recent paycheck.

A bill, also called the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act, to supersede the decision, was introduced in the 110th United States Congress but was never enacted, as it was passed by the House but failed in the Senate.

During the campaign for the 2008 elections, the Democrats criticized Republicans for defeating the 2007 version of the bill, citing Republican presidential candidate John McCain's opposition to the bill and candidate Barack Obama's support.[1]

The antecedents of the case were posed when Lilly Ledbetter, a production supervisor at a Goodyear tire plant in Alabama, filed an equal-pay lawsuit regarding pay discrimination under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, six months before her early retirement in 1998.

Was she discriminated against? yes.  Was she a woman? yes  Did the republicans attempt to block it? yes again.

Quoting mom2twinboyz:

 

Lily LedBetter (or Bedwetter) was not about equal pay at all. All it gave was a right to be sue happy. Purly benefitting corrupt lawyers.

Quoting lnicole:

 It's like saying you sign a bill to make abortion illegal and don't support equal pay for women then your surprised you lose most of the female vote.

 

 

 

 

mom2twinboyz
by Bronze Member on Nov. 16, 2012 at 9:12 PM

BTW The Lily Ledbetter Act has done nothing to bridge thepay gap

http://news.firedoglake.com/2012/01/31/lilly-ledbetter-did-not-alter-pay-equity-gap-whatsoever/

mom2twinboyz
by Bronze Member on Nov. 16, 2012 at 9:27 PM

 

Becuase of the opportunity for frivilous lawsuits.

Quoting lnicole:

 I know what it does..and I know what the bill is....the main question is why would anyone NOT support it?  If someone is being discriminated against they should have that right.  Discrimination is NOT legal.

Quoting mom2twinboyz:

 

Right, it gives them the RIGHT to sue for discrimination. It doesn't demand companies pay women equally. Again big difference.

Quoting lnicole:

 

The Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act of 2009 (Pub.L. 111-2, S. 181) is a federal statute in the United States that was the first bill signed into law by President Barack Obama on January 29, 2009. The Act amends the Civil Rights Act of 1964. The new act states that the 180-day statute of limitations for filing an equal-pay lawsuit regarding pay discrimination resets with each new paycheck affected by that discriminatory action. The law directly addressed Ledbetter v. Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co., 550 U.S. 618 (2007), a U.S. Supreme Court decision that the statute of limitations for presenting an equal-pay lawsuit begins on the date that the employer makes the initial discriminatory wage decision, not at the date of the most recent paycheck.

A bill, also called the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act, to supersede the decision, was introduced in the 110th United States Congress but was never enacted, as it was passed by the House but failed in the Senate.

During the campaign for the 2008 elections, the Democrats criticized Republicans for defeating the 2007 version of the bill, citing Republican presidential candidate John McCain's opposition to the bill and candidate Barack Obama's support.[1]

The antecedents of the case were posed when Lilly Ledbetter, a production supervisor at a Goodyear tire plant in Alabama, filed an equal-pay lawsuit regarding pay discrimination under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, six months before her early retirement in 1998.

Was she discriminated against? yes.  Was she a woman? yes  Did the republicans attempt to block it? yes again.

Quoting mom2twinboyz:

 

Lily LedBetter (or Bedwetter) was not about equal pay at all. All it gave was a right to be sue happy. Purly benefitting corrupt lawyers.

Quoting lnicole:

 It's like saying you sign a bill to make abortion illegal and don't support equal pay for women then your surprised you lose most of the female vote.

 

 

 

 


notonepercenter
by Bronze Member on Nov. 16, 2012 at 9:34 PM
3 moms liked this

Re-electing Obama is like . . . . Reality!  Accept it! 

broncfan
by Silver Member on Nov. 16, 2012 at 9:45 PM


Quoting Kate_Momof3:

I just got out of the hospital two days ago. I have a long recovery ahead. Thank you for the sincere welcome back. I wish you'd be nicer and get beyond the partisanship; it's old and the election is over. 

Sandy victims are my big concern these days.

Quoting imamomzilla:

 YOU'RE BACK!! You were missed.

welcome back

Quoting Kate_Momof3:

She is a never-ending font of it. No substance, pure bullshit.

Quoting autodidact:

oh, bullshit. 


 


Wow, so sorry I did not realize you were in the hospital.  Hope everything is OK and wishes for a fast and pain free recovery.

I agree, we should all be worried about the Sandy victims.  It looks like FEMA has not improved much after Katerina.

autodidact
by Silver Member on Nov. 16, 2012 at 10:12 PM
1 mom liked this

and what is it about an extention of the statue of limitation for discrimination that you think would cause the opportunity for frivolous lawsuits? 


Quoting mom2twinboyz:


Becuase of the opportunity for frivilous lawsuits.

Quoting lnicole:

 I know what it does..and I know what the bill is....the main question is why would anyone NOT support it?  If someone is being discriminated against they should have that right.  Discrimination is NOT legal.

Quoting mom2twinboyz:


Right, it gives them the RIGHT to sue for discrimination. It doesn't demand companies pay women equally. Again big difference.

Quoting lnicole:

 

The Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act of 2009 (Pub.L. 111-2, S. 181) is a federal statute in the United States that was the first bill signed into law by President Barack Obama on January 29, 2009. The Act amends the Civil Rights Act of 1964. The new act states that the 180-day statute of limitations for filing an equal-pay lawsuit regarding pay discrimination resets with each new paycheck affected by that discriminatory action. The law directly addressed Ledbetter v. Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co., 550 U.S. 618 (2007), a U.S. Supreme Court decision that the statute of limitations for presenting an equal-pay lawsuit begins on the date that the employer makes the initial discriminatory wage decision, not at the date of the most recent paycheck.

A bill, also called the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act, to supersede the decision, was introduced in the 110th United States Congress but was never enacted, as it was passed by the House but failed in the Senate.

During the campaign for the 2008 elections, the Democrats criticized Republicans for defeating the 2007 version of the bill, citing Republican presidential candidate John McCain's opposition to the bill and candidate Barack Obama's support.[1]

The antecedents of the case were posed when Lilly Ledbetter, a production supervisor at a Goodyear tire plant in Alabama, filed an equal-pay lawsuit regarding pay discrimination under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, six months before her early retirement in 1998.

Was she discriminated against? yes.  Was she a woman? yes  Did the republicans attempt to block it? yes again.

Quoting mom2twinboyz:


Lily LedBetter (or Bedwetter) was not about equal pay at all. All it gave was a right to be sue happy. Purly benefitting corrupt lawyers.

Quoting lnicole:

 It's like saying you sign a bill to make abortion illegal and don't support equal pay for women then your surprised you lose most of the female vote.


 


 






Analeigh2012
by Silver Member on Nov. 16, 2012 at 10:19 PM
He clearly spoke of illegal immigrants as those who should self deport, and if 70% of illegals voted against Romney, you are laying out a case of voter fraud as illegal immigrants do not have the right to vote.
SMDH


Quoting lnicole:

 It's like saying you wish immigrants would self deport, then are surprised when you lose 70% of their vote.

Posted on CafeMom Mobile
mom2twinboyz
by Bronze Member on Nov. 16, 2012 at 10:25 PM

 

Well I mean come on you either are or you aren't being discriminated against. I mean what the heck you going to be able to go back 5 yrs and claim descrimination because you feel like it.

It shouldn't have to take you that long to act on something you feel that is unjust. Chances are you would act right away. If you are let go from a company anywayI believe you have a certain amout of time to seek legal action under the statue. Extending just opens up a whole can of worms and doesn't allow legitimate cases to be taken seriously.

Quoting autodidact:

and what is it about an extention of the statue of limitation for discrimination that you think would cause the opportunity for frivolous lawsuits? 

 

Quoting mom2twinboyz:

 

Becuase of the opportunity for frivilous lawsuits.

Quoting lnicole:

 I know what it does..and I know what the bill is....the main question is why would anyone NOT support it?  If someone is being discriminated against they should have that right.  Discrimination is NOT legal.

Quoting mom2twinboyz:

 

Right, it gives them the RIGHT to sue for discrimination. It doesn't demand companies pay women equally. Again big difference.

Quoting lnicole:

 

The Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act of 2009 (Pub.L. 111-2, S. 181) is a federal statute in the United States that was the first bill signed into law by President Barack Obama on January 29, 2009. The Act amends the Civil Rights Act of 1964. The new act states that the 180-day statute of limitations for filing an equal-pay lawsuit regarding pay discrimination resets with each new paycheck affected by that discriminatory action. The law directly addressed Ledbetter v. Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co., 550 U.S. 618 (2007), a U.S. Supreme Court decision that the statute of limitations for presenting an equal-pay lawsuit begins on the date that the employer makes the initial discriminatory wage decision, not at the date of the most recent paycheck.

A bill, also called the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act, to supersede the decision, was introduced in the 110th United States Congress but was never enacted, as it was passed by the House but failed in the Senate.

During the campaign for the 2008 elections, the Democrats criticized Republicans for defeating the 2007 version of the bill, citing Republican presidential candidate John McCain's opposition to the bill and candidate Barack Obama's support.[1]

The antecedents of the case were posed when Lilly Ledbetter, a production supervisor at a Goodyear tire plant in Alabama, filed an equal-pay lawsuit regarding pay discrimination under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, six months before her early retirement in 1998.

Was she discriminated against? yes.  Was she a woman? yes  Did the republicans attempt to block it? yes again.

Quoting mom2twinboyz:

 

Lily LedBetter (or Bedwetter) was not about equal pay at all. All it gave was a right to be sue happy. Purly benefitting corrupt lawyers.

Quoting lnicole:

 It's like saying you sign a bill to make abortion illegal and don't support equal pay for women then your surprised you lose most of the female vote.

 

 

 

 

 

 


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