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News & Politics News & Politics

Florida's Long Lines On Election Day Discouraged 49,000 People From Voting: Report

Posted by on Dec. 29, 2012 at 6:19 PM
  • 8 Replies

Florida's Long Lines On Election Day Discouraged 49,000 People From Voting: Report


Florida Long Lines
As many as 49,000 people in Central Florida were discouraged from voting in the 2012 elections because of long lines at the polls, according to a new report. (AP Photo/J Pat Carter, File)

Florida took center stage in the 2012 elections, when voters around the state had to wait in line at the polls for up to nine hours. Gov. Rick Scott (R) initially denied that there was any problem, saying it was "very good" that people were getting out to vote.

But a new study shows that tens of thousands of people were actually discouraged from voting because of the long lines.

According to an analysis by Theodore Allen, an associate professor of industrial engineering at Ohio State University, as many as 49,000 individuals in Central Florida did not vote because of the problems at the polls.

About 19,000 of those people would have backed former GOP nominee Mitt Romney, while the rest would have gone for President Barack Obama, according to Allen.

The Orlando Sentinel, which published the results of Allen's research, notes that those findings suggest "that Obama's margin over Romney in Florida could have been roughly 11,000 votes higher than it was, based just on Central Florida results. Obama carried the state by 74,309 votes out of more than 8.4 million cast."

Since the elections, Scott has admitted that his state still has its share of electoral problems. In a December interview with CNN, Scott said "we've got to restore confidence in our elections," pointing to three issues: the length of ballots, size of polling places and the number of days for early voting.

Indeed, Allen's research also found that the long ballots that confronted many Florida voters led to longer lines, which resulted in suppressing turnout. Black and Hispanic voters were disproportionately disenfranchised.

The GOP-controlled legislature reduced the number of days available for early voting from 14 to eight for the 2012 elections, meaning voters were trying to cast their ballots in a shorter window, which resulted in longer lines.

Scott refused to extend early voting hours even as problems at the polls gained more attention. Former Florida Gov. Charlie Crist, who was a Republican while in office but is now a Democrat,- called his position "indefensible."

Democratic state lawmakers in Florida have introduced legislation to address the long lines and expand early voting hours. There have also been several efforts at the federal level, and Obama has said it is imperative to "fix" problems at the polls.

by on Dec. 29, 2012 at 6:19 PM
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Replies (1-8):
gsprofval
by Gold Member on Dec. 29, 2012 at 6:21 PM

Hmmm, can we say illegals voting illegally?

PamR
by Platinum Member on Dec. 29, 2012 at 6:24 PM
1 mom liked this


Quoting gsprofval:

Hmmm, can we say illegals voting illegally?

Which has what to do with the Governor of Florida attempting to disenfranchise voters in the state?

Legal residents were made to stand on lines for up to 8 or 9 hours in order to vote.  Some people just can't do that.  And the governor knew that.  It was no accident.

gsprofval
by Gold Member on Dec. 29, 2012 at 6:51 PM

Out of 175,554 registered voters, 247,713 vote cards were cast in St. Lucie County, Florida, on Tuesday”
Read more at http://www.wnd.com/2012/11/the-big-list-of-vote-fraud-reports/#UGyJ0zEhQeesZAdc.99 

SallyMJ
by Ruby Member on Dec. 29, 2012 at 7:14 PM
2 moms liked this

Florida's Long Lines On Election Day Discouraged 49,000 People From Voting: Report   Negative - This article is about early voting - not voting on Election Day.

"Black and Hispanic voters were disproportionately disenfranchised." Negative. Disenfranchise means to deprive someone of the right to vote. That didn't happen here. Nobody was forced to leave. And again, this was EARLY VOTING, which only a few of the polling places have. All polls were open on Election Day. Someone who got discouraged from waiting during early voting could always vote Nov. 6.

I seriously doubt 50K people didn't vote on Election Day because of long lines during early voting. So they didn't vote Nov. 6, because the line on Oct. 31 was too long? That doesn't even make sense.

Why can't they just report the facts? It sounds like there were too few polling places for early voting. That is not that difficult to say or report.

Inaccurate, scaremongering "journalism" strikes again.

PamR
by Platinum Member on Dec. 29, 2012 at 7:34 PM
1 mom liked this


Quoting SallyMJ:

Florida's Long Lines On Election Day Discouraged 49,000 People From Voting: Report   Negative - This article is about early voting - not voting on Election Day.

"Black and Hispanic voters were disproportionately disenfranchised." Negative. Disenfranchise means to deprive someone of the right to vote. That didn't happen here. Nobody was forced to leave. And again, this was EARLY VOTING, which only a few of the polling places have. All polls were open on Election Day. Someone who got discouraged from waiting during early voting could always vote Nov. 6.

I seriously doubt 50K people didn't vote on Election Day because of long lines during early voting. So they didn't vote Nov. 6, because the line on Oct. 31 was too long? That doesn't even make sense.

Why can't they just report the facts? It sounds like there were too few polling places for early voting. That is not that difficult to say or report.

Inaccurate, scaremongering "journalism" strikes again.

It was no mistake that the people who were disporportionately disenfranchised were minorities.  Because the GOP knew which way the wind was blowing.  No American should have to spend 9 hours in a line in order to vote.  No one.

Sisteract
by Socialist Hippie on Dec. 29, 2012 at 7:50 PM

Wasn't the ballot 10+ pages long in some counties?

SallyMJ
by Ruby Member on Dec. 29, 2012 at 8:03 PM

Again - no one was disenfranchised, no one had their right to vote taken away. It may be true that more minorities tried to vote early early, perhaps on the last day.

Back in the olden days, prior to early voting, voting in all states was done on Election Day. If someone is tired from waiting in an early voting line on Oct. 31, their back-up plan of Election Day is always an option.

Negative- No political party decides where polling places are, and which are designated early voting sites. It's done by the State Department of each state.

Quoting PamR:


Quoting SallyMJ:

Florida's Long Lines On Election Day Discouraged 49,000 People From Voting: Report   Negative - This article is about early voting - not voting on Election Day.

"Black and Hispanic voters were disproportionately disenfranchised." Negative. Disenfranchise means to deprive someone of the right to vote. That didn't happen here. Nobody was forced to leave. And again, this was EARLY VOTING, which only a few of the polling places have. All polls were open on Election Day. Someone who got discouraged from waiting during early voting could always vote Nov. 6.

I seriously doubt 50K people didn't vote on Election Day because of long lines during early voting. So they didn't vote Nov. 6, because the line on Oct. 31 was too long? That doesn't even make sense.

Why can't they just report the facts? It sounds like there were too few polling places for early voting. That is not that difficult to say or report.

Inaccurate, scaremongering "journalism" strikes again.

It was no mistake that the people who were disporportionately disenfranchised were minorities.  Because the GOP knew which way the wind was blowing.  No American should have to spend 9 hours in a line in order to vote.  No one.


SallyMJ
by Ruby Member on Dec. 29, 2012 at 8:09 PM

Not sure - many times our California state ballot is long because of all the state constitutional Propositions, and other elections. The General Election ballot is almost always the longest.

It's always been that way - that's nothing new.

I find it interesting that the article titles are about long lines on Election Day, people being disenfranchised - but they are not even about Election Day! Or disenfranchisement. Sure, they can improve their early voting - but it's not like anyone was not permitted to vote (ie, disenfranchised). Love the alarm bell reporting. Next time they will say the sky is falling.

Quoting Sisteract:

Wasn't the ballot 10+ pages long in some counties?


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