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Conservatives rebel against Boehner

Posted by on Jan. 3, 2013 at 8:54 PM
  • 17 Replies

Conservatives rebel against Boehner



Rep. Tim Huelskamp sits on the House floor during the speaker vote with his iPad on Jan. 3, 2012. | Jay Westcott/POLITICO

Tim Huelskamp sat on the House floor during the speaker vote brandishing an iPad. | Jay Westcott/POLITICO

Conservative opposition to John Boehner’s reelection as speaker on Thursday was more determined than it originally seemed, as a small band of hard-liners either flat-out opposed the speaker or simply abstained from casting a ballot.

There were some signs that conservative resistance to Boehner was well-organized, at least by one member who has never been a big fan of the Ohio Republican.


Rep. Tim Huelskamp (R-Kan.) — who was recently removed from key committees and supported Rep. Jim Jordan (R-Ohio) for speaker — sat on the House floor during the speaker vote brandishing an iPad. A message was displayed on the screen ticking off members of the House Republican Conference he hoped would oppose the sitting speaker. The title of the document: “You would be fired if this goes out.”

Among the Republicans on the list were Reps. Steve King (Iowa), Cynthia Lummis (Wyo.), Paul Gosar (Ariz.), Scott Garrett (N.J.), Steve Fincher (Tenn.) and Scott Desjarlais (Tenn.). All of them ultimately supported Boehner.

It’s not clear that any of the Republicans on Huelskamp’s list knew they were on it, or even knew of the list’s existence.

In the end, nine Republicans abandoned the Ohio Republican’s bid for a second term as speaker, and cast votes for people as varied as a former member of Congress who lost his reelection bid in November and a 1990s-era U.S. comptroller general who appears on cable television.

(Also on POLITICO: Boehner's battle for speaker)

Two Republicans – Reps. Raul Labrador (Idaho) and Mick Mulvaney (S.C.) – sat in the chamber, pointedly ignoring the call of their name to cast a vote for Boehner, who edged to victory with 220 votes. And newly elected Rep. Steve Stockman (R-Texas), who returned to the House after 15 yearsvoted “present,” demonstrating his lack of fear for the diminished Boehner.

Majority Leader Eric Cantor (R-Va.) — long a foil to Boehner — got three votes. As a trio of Republicans lawmakers cast their votes for him, Cantor shook his head on the House floor, visibly displeased. His office declined to comment on the vote.

Huelskamp’s and others’ whipping efforts to oust the speaker fell short, though several lawmakers listed in the Kansan’s iPad message did oppose Boehner, including Reps. Justin Amash (Mich.), Louie Gohmert (Texas) and Paul Broun (Ga.).

“I will not comment on stories that invade personal e-mails or private property,” Huelskamp said in a statement read by a spokesman when asked about the anti-Boehner list, which was clearly visible to photographers and reporters as he worked on it while sitting on the House floor.

But the drama playing out among House Republicans during the last 48 hours was a rebuke of Boehner’s leadership — and one that matters in both substance and style.

A small, but extraordinarily vocal group of conservatives sent Boehner a message: We don’t trust you.

Boehner allies write off the near-miss as sour grapes from lawmakers who have long opposed the Ohio Republican. Boehner is speaker for the 113th Congress, they noted. But the numbers do matter. Boehner now faces significant restiveness in his ranks over taxes, spending, borrowing, messaging and his hands-off leadership style.

And this comes as Boehner is about to enter three months that will define his tenure as speaker.

He is now somewhat weakened leading into key showdowns with President Barack Obama over the debt ceiling, the tens of billions in spending cuts known as the sequester - which will kick in in two months - and a government-funding bill, also set to expire in March. The debt ceiling in particular has become a rallying cry for conservatives as they seek to avenge themselves for the tax hikes imposed as a result of the fiscal cliff deal.

The discontented Republicans who opposed Boehner on Thursday — people like 18-year veteran Rep. Walter Jones of North Carolina — say that the number of Republicans willing to entertain a challenge to Boehner was actually closer to 20. If Boehner hadn’t made peace this week with the New Jersey and New York delegations over the Hurricane Sandy aid bill — which Boehner initially refused to bring up for a vote until publicly smacked by Gov. Chris Christie (R) and others — the speaker may have had an even bigger problem on his hands.


The problems were evident on the floor right before the roll-call to pick the speaker. Majority Whip Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.) had an animated conservation with Fincher, one of the names on Huelskamp’s whip list urging him to vote for Boehner. McCarthy’s lobbying worked and Fincher backed Boehner’s reelection.

Amash, a second-term libertarian lawmaker, was also trying to rally support against Boehner. He ended up voting for his colleague, Rep. Raul Labrador (R-Idaho).

Amash — who was recently booted off the Budget Committee by the GOP leadership — said there were “more than a couple dozen members who openly expressed their discontent to having the speaker continue,” although only 12 were willing to publicly display that on the floor by opposing Boehner’s reelection.

As opposed to tea party-allied Republicans, Amash thinks there’s too much partisanship being promoted by Boehner and other party leaders, and he wants real compromises with Democrats.

“Republicans have become too focused on hating Democrats and not focused enough on dealing with the real problems we have as a country,” Amash said. “Let’s cut the partisan crap out. Republicans and Democrats can work together to balance our budget. They just have to do it. They have to have the courage to do it.”

Amash added: “The reason I‘m upset with our leadership is not because they’re working with Democrats. It’s because they’re not working with Democrats.”

Garrett, who didn’t vote at all in the first round and was also on the Huelskamp list, was convinced to support Boehner after being lobbied by leadership, GOP insiders said.

Even those who supported Boehner complain about how the leader operates, and the freedom he will have to negotiate with Obama and Democrats is likely to be severely restrained.

Rep. John Fleming (R-La.) said the GOP conference is “starting out with less momentum than we did before. That’s an issue.”

“If you have a speaker that decides up front they wont shut government down, or go over whatever cliff may emerge, well then you really don’t have any bargaining chips,” Fleming told POLITICO. “So that’s yet to be seen.”

Rep. Phil Gingrey (R-Ga.) said “it would be fair to say that he is a little bit on a hot seat,” but noted it wasn’t totally his fault.

Rep. Steve Pearce (R-N.M.), who voted for Cantor over Boehner, told POLITICO he was “looking for a different direction.” Boehner, he said, needs to “offer bold leadership, that’s what I’m looking for.”

There’s evidence that Boehner senses the tension — and is looking to find ways to ease it. He told House Republicans he’s done negotiating behind closed doors with Obama. He’ll spend time at the House Republican retreat — set to occur Jan. 16 in Williamsburg, Va. — talking about how the conference will resolve internal differences, while still being able to pass important bills with solely Republican votes, lawmakers said

However, there are members who simply feel wronged by Boehner and his leadership team. Jones, who voted for former U.S. Comptroller General David Walker for speaker, is at the end of his rope with leadership

“The statement is we need to go back to conservative principles, and stop all this growing the government,” Jones said.




by on Jan. 3, 2013 at 8:54 PM
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Replies (1-10):
SallyMJ
by Ruby Member on Jan. 3, 2013 at 9:03 PM
5 moms liked this

Hey - At least, dissent and freedom of speech  are allowed in the Republican Party.

Democrats? Not so much.

sweet-a-kins
by Ruby Member on Jan. 3, 2013 at 9:10 PM

 113th will be the same as this

sweet-a-kins
by Ruby Member on Jan. 3, 2013 at 9:11 PM

 

Quoting SallyMJ:

Hey - At least, dissent and freedom of speech  are allowed in the Republican Party.

Democrats? Not so much.

 so the OPPOSITE of the truth! lol...dems fight all the time with each other! lol

SallyMJ
by Ruby Member on Jan. 3, 2013 at 9:30 PM
3 moms liked this

Huh? That doesn't even make sense.

Conservatives can have a variety of opinions - liberals cannot. Liberals in fact, kick people out of their party - people like Joe Lieberman, who was the Democrat VP candidate, no less! - but has military views other than the rank and file Democrats. Ergo, Dems did not support him for reelection, and he had to run as an independent. Nice way to reward a loyal Democrat.

How about at the DNC, taking out mentions of God, and Jerusalem as the capital of Israel. Obama didn't realize how negatively these steps were taken by the American people, so he "needed" to add them back, despite not having anything approaching a 2/3 majority of the delegates to do so. Huge fight at the convention, but the DNC unilaterally shut down its own dissenters. And Democrats shouted down pro-life Democrats. So you are not allowed to have your own opinion as a Democrat different from the party line, but you can as a Republican

It's really not that complicated.

Quoting sweet-a-kins:

 

Quoting SallyMJ:

Hey - At least, dissent and freedom of speech  are allowed in the Republican Party.

Democrats? Not so much.

 so the OPPOSITE of the truth! lol...dems fight all the time with each other! lol


sweet-a-kins
by Ruby Member on Jan. 3, 2013 at 9:35 PM
2 moms liked this

 You got all that Bass Ackwards

Lieberman wasn't chased from the party, he became in Indy when he lost the democratic bid in his state as a Dem so he became an Indy to run third party..

The republican party is KNOWN for doing EXACTLY this type of thing..

anyone that doesn't follow marching orders in the republican party is called a RINO...anyone. Even someone as decorated and respected as Colin Powell

Face it, your party is a JOKE these days

**ETA
 POTUS has ZERO to do with taking God out of the DNC platform lol...

Quoting SallyMJ:

Huh? That doesn't even make sense.

Conservatives can have a variety of opinions - liberals cannot. Liberals in fact, kick people out of their party - people like Joe Lieberman, who was the Democrat VP candidate, no less! - but has military views other than the rank and file Democrats. Ergo, Dems did not support him for reelection, and he had to run as an independent. Nice way to reward a loyal Democrat.

How about at the DNC, taking out mentions of God, and Jerusalem as the capital of Israel. Obama didn't realize how negatively these steps were taken by the American people, so he "needed" to add them back, despite not having anything approaching a 2/3 majority of the delegates to do so. Huge fight at the convention, but the DNC unilaterally shut down its own dissenters. And Democrats shouted down pro-life Democrats. So you are not allowed to have your own opinion as a Democrat different from the party line, but you can as a Republican

It's really not that complicated.

Quoting sweet-a-kins:

 

Quoting SallyMJ:

Hey - At least, dissent and freedom of speech  are allowed in the Republican Party.

Democrats? Not so much.

 so the OPPOSITE of the truth! lol...dems fight all the time with each other! lol

 

 

cbk_mom3
by on Jan. 3, 2013 at 9:36 PM
2 moms liked this

He is STILL head and shoulders above and better than Nancy Pelosi, the Botox queen!

shannonnigans
by Silver Member on Jan. 3, 2013 at 10:28 PM
1 mom liked this

Wow, that is one fractured party.  And now the Tea Party is making their usual "this will have consequences" threats with regard to primaries, indicating they'll elect more right-wing extremists who will then lose in general elections.  The remarkable thing is how quickly the GOP is coming apart.  It was talked about after the election, but this is going faster than I think anyone suspected.  Team chemistry isn't exactly a strength of the GOP right about now.

imamomzilla
by on Jan. 3, 2013 at 10:31 PM
1 mom liked this

 He's an appeaser. I don't have much respect for him and all that crying is embarrassing.

Grow a pair, Boehner.

SallyMJ
by Ruby Member on Jan. 4, 2013 at 1:11 AM
1 mom liked this

Negative - You don't follow the news too well, do you? Psst - Jon Stewart is really not a good news source.

The Democratic Party for the first time in Lieberman's long career, heavily supported a newbie Dem candidate instead of Lieberman - to punish Lieberman for supporting the Iraq and Afghanistan wars, and his view on Israel - notwithstanding his loyal years of service and faithful support of every other Democrat issue. The Dems effectively kicked him out of the party - removing all the support, financial and otherwise, they had given him for the previous 35-40 years. As a result, The Dem newbie won the primary. The only way Lieberman could run in the election was as an independent, not a Democrat. And Lieberman won, even though the Democrat Party did everything they could to make him lose, both in the primary and the election. So although Lieberman continued to caucus as a Democrat, he couldn't BE a Democrat, because Dems do not allow viewpoints contrary to the Democrat Party line. Republicans respect Lieberman more than Democrats do.

Obama had EVERYTHING to do with taking God and Jerusalem out of the platform, and putting it back. He personally approved it the first time - and when there was an explosion of public criticism, he personally added it back. Even though LA Mayor Villaraigosa had the crowd do a verbal vote three times, and finally said (outrageously falsely) that God and Jerusalem had been approved to be added back to the platform by 2/3 of the DNC delegates. Riiight... Jeez, I watched the DNC, and was shocked at the DNC's treatment of its own delegates. And I'm not even a liberal! I take it you did not, even though it is your party.  Do you not watch your own convention??

So it seems I - a conservative - know Democrat Party history better than an actual Democrat. Fascinating.

You've got a strange sense of humor. (And it's not even funny.) You might want to take a humor class at your nearest community college. I understand they are pretty inexpensive. It would help you in your knowedge and skills needed to do your current job. I'm sure you can get tuition reimbursement.  

Quoting sweet-a-kins:

 You got all that Bass Ackwards

Lieberman wasn't chased from the party, he became in Indy when he lost the democratic bid in his state as a Dem so he became an Indy to run third party..

The republican party is KNOWN for doing EXACTLY this type of thing..

anyone that doesn't follow marching orders in the republican party is called a RINO...anyone. Even someone as decorated and respected as Colin Powell

Face it, your party is a JOKE these days

**ETA
 POTUS has ZERO to do with taking God out of the DNC platform lol...

Quoting SallyMJ:

Huh? That doesn't even make sense.

Conservatives can have a variety of opinions - liberals cannot. Liberals in fact, kick people out of their party - people like Joe Lieberman, who was the Democrat VP candidate, no less! - but has military views other than the rank and file Democrats. Ergo, Dems did not support him for reelection, and he had to run as an independent. Nice way to reward a loyal Democrat.

How about at the DNC, taking out mentions of God, and Jerusalem as the capital of Israel. Obama didn't realize how negatively these steps were taken by the American people, so he "needed" to add them back, despite not having anything approaching a 2/3 majority of the delegates to do so. Huge fight at the convention, but the DNC unilaterally shut down its own dissenters. And Democrats shouted down pro-life Democrats. So you are not allowed to have your own opinion as a Democrat different from the party line, but you can as a Republican

It's really not that complicated.

Quoting sweet-a-kins:

 

Quoting SallyMJ:

Hey - At least, dissent and freedom of speech  are allowed in the Republican Party.

Democrats? Not so much.

 so the OPPOSITE of the truth! lol...dems fight all the time with each other! lol


 


sweet-a-kins
by Ruby Member on Jan. 4, 2013 at 5:25 AM
No, you don't

You are wrong on everything here, you are putting your own spin

If the dem party booted Lieberman (they didnt but following your made up lie)

Crist was kicked out of yours

Is that how it happened ?

And no, POtUS had nothing to do withe the DNC taking our or adding God. To the platform

Speaking of false votes...do you remember the RNC false vote?

On tv they lied and Texas delegates damn near walked out


Quoting SallyMJ:

Negative - You don't follow the news too well, do you? Psst - Jon Stewart is really not a good news source.

The Democratic Party for the first time in Lieberman's long career, heavily supported a newbie Dem candidate instead of Lieberman - to punish Lieberman for supporting the Iraq and Afghanistan wars, and his view on Israel - notwithstanding his loyal years of service and faithful support of every other Democrat issue. The Dems effectively kicked him out of the party - removing all the support, financial and otherwise, they had given him for the previous 35-40 years. As a result, The Dem newbie won the primary. The only way Lieberman could run in the election was as an independent, not a Democrat. And Lieberman won, even though the Democrat Party did everything they could to make him lose, both in the primary and the election. So although Lieberman continued to caucus as a Democrat, he couldn't BE a Democrat, because Dems do not allow viewpoints contrary to the Democrat Party line. Republicans respect Lieberman more than Democrats do.

Obama had EVERYTHING to do with taking God and Jerusalem out of the platform, and putting it back. He personally approved it the first time - and when there was an explosion of public criticism, he personally added it back. Even though LA Mayor Villaraigosa had the crowd do a verbal vote three times, and finally said (outrageously falsely) that God and Jerusalem had been approved to be added back to the platform by 2/3 of the DNC delegates. Riiight... Jeez, I watched the DNC, and was shocked at the DNC's treatment of its own delegates. And I'm not even a liberal! I take it you did not, even though it is your party.  Do you not watch your own convention??

So it seems I - a conservative - know Democrat Party history better than an actual Democrat. Fascinating.

You've got a strange sense of humor. (And it's not even funny.) You might want to take a humor class at your nearest community college. I understand they are pretty inexpensive. It would help you in your knowedge and skills needed to do your current job. I'm sure you can get tuition reimbursement.  


Quoting sweet-a-kins:

 You got all that Bass Ackwards


Lieberman wasn't chased from the party, he became in Indy when he lost the democratic bid in his state as a Dem so he became an Indy to run third party..


The republican party is KNOWN for doing EXACTLY this type of thing..


anyone that doesn't follow marching orders in the republican party is called a RINO...anyone. Even someone as decorated and respected as Colin Powell


Face it, your party is a JOKE these days


**ETA
 POTUS has ZERO to do with taking God out of the DNC platform lol...


Quoting SallyMJ:


Huh? That doesn't even make sense.


Conservatives can have a variety of opinions - liberals cannot. Liberals in fact, kick people out of their party - people like Joe Lieberman, who was the Democrat VP candidate, no less! - but has military views other than the rank and file Democrats. Ergo, Dems did not support him for reelection, and he had to run as an independent. Nice way to reward a loyal Democrat.


How about at the DNC, taking out mentions of God, and Jerusalem as the capital of Israel. Obama didn't realize how negatively these steps were taken by the American people, so he "needed" to add them back, despite not having anything approaching a 2/3 majority of the delegates to do so. Huge fight at the convention, but the DNC unilaterally shut down its own dissenters. And Democrats shouted down pro-life Democrats. So you are not allowed to have your own opinion as a Democrat different from the party line, but you can as a Republican


It's really not that complicated.


Quoting sweet-a-kins:


 


Quoting SallyMJ:


Hey - At least, dissent and freedom of speech  are allowed in the Republican Party.


Democrats? Not so much.


 so the OPPOSITE of the truth! lol...dems fight all the time with each other! lol




 


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