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The Monkeysphere: Human Nature

Posted by on Jan. 10, 2013 at 9:50 AM
  • 23 Replies
1 mom liked this

Read it, it's interesting, then come back!

 

:)

 

What is the Monkeysphere?

By: September 30, 2007 1,351,136 views
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"One death is a tragedy. One million deaths is a statistic."
-Kevin Federline

 

What do monkeys have to do with war, oppression, crime, racism and even e-mail spam? You'll see that all of the random ass-headed cruelty of the world will suddenly make perfect sense once we go Inside the Monkeysphere.

 

"What the Hell is the Monkeysphere?"

First, picture a monkey. A monkey dressed like a little pirate, if that helps you. We'll call him Slappy.

 

Imagine you have Slappy as a pet. Imagine a personality for him. Maybe you and he have little pirate monkey adventures and maybe even join up to fight crime. Think how sad you'd be if Slappy died.

 

Now, imagine you get four more monkeys. We'll call them Tito, Bubbles, Marcel and ShitTosser. Imagine personalities for each of them now. Maybe one is aggressive, one is affectionate, one is quiet, the other just throws shit all the time. But they're all your personal monkey friends.

 

Now imagine a hundred monkeys.

 

Not so easy now, is it? So how many monkeys would you have to own before you couldn't remember their names? At what point, in your mind, do your beloved pets become just a faceless sea of monkey? Even though each one is every bit the monkey Slappy was, there's a certain point where you will no longer really care if one of them dies.

 

So how many monkeys would it take before you stopped caring?

 

That's not a rhetorical question. We actually know the number.

Read more: http://www.cracked.com/article_14990_what-monkeysphere.html#ixzz2HaHXcB75

Don't miss the rest of it, at the link.

Do you think the article describes most people well, including you and most people you know?

by on Jan. 10, 2013 at 9:50 AM
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Replies (1-10):
romalove
by SenseandSensibility on Jan. 10, 2013 at 10:08 AM

I read it, all of it.

I struggled with parts of it.  I mean, I'm not a person who sees everyone outside my "monkeysphere" as faceless.  I have told restaurants when they undercharged me, I wouldn't think of stealing cable, etc.  I don't live to get over on someone else.  I'm a very ethical businessperson, bending over backwards to where I will cheat myself before a worker or a client.  

Having said that, yeah, I care more when someone I know dies than when strangers in China die.  I have empathy and compassion for other people's tragedies but when it hits home of course it is different.

My question for you is, what made you think to post this?  :-)

Meadowchik
by Gold Member on Jan. 10, 2013 at 10:25 AM

 

Quoting romalove:

I read it, all of it.

I struggled with parts of it.  I mean, I'm not a person who sees everyone outside my "monkeysphere" as faceless.  I have told restaurants when they undercharged me, I wouldn't think of stealing cable, etc.  I don't live to get over on someone else.  I'm a very ethical businessperson, bending over backwards to where I will cheat myself before a worker or a client.  

Ditto.

Having said that, yeah, I care more when someone I know dies than when strangers in China die.  I have empathy and compassion for other people's tragedies but when it hits home of course it is different.

Same here.

My question for you is, what made you think to post this?  :-)

I brought it to the Politics Group sorta as a spin-off of Clairwil's post about defining human life.  But IMO the concept has an even broader application than the abortion topic, regarding politics.  The first obvious question is whether human societies can ever really successfully govern themselves on scales so much more massive than their "monkeyspheres." That's a start.

 

romalove
by SenseandSensibility on Jan. 10, 2013 at 10:28 AM


Quoting Meadowchik:

 

Quoting romalove:

I read it, all of it.

I struggled with parts of it.  I mean, I'm not a person who sees everyone outside my "monkeysphere" as faceless.  I have told restaurants when they undercharged me, I wouldn't think of stealing cable, etc.  I don't live to get over on someone else.  I'm a very ethical businessperson, bending over backwards to where I will cheat myself before a worker or a client.  

Ditto.

Having said that, yeah, I care more when someone I know dies than when strangers in China die.  I have empathy and compassion for other people's tragedies but when it hits home of course it is different.

Same here.

My question for you is, what made you think to post this?  :-)

I brought it to the Politics Group sorta as a spin-off of Clairwil's post about defining human life.  But IMO the concept has an even broader application than the abortion topic, regarding politics.  The first obvious question is whether human societies can ever really successfully govern themselves on scales so much more massive than their "monkeyspheres." That's a start.

 

Hmmmm

Well, we have local, state and then federal governments.

You would think within those groupings you could see differences, wouldn't you, in how effectively they govern based on those monkeyspheres.

How would you quantify those groupings to figure out if it holds true?

Small towns to small towns?

How big the town is before it changes?

Differences state to federal?

Congress.....representatives run every two years and have their much smaller districts.  Senators from states have much larger amounts of people to be in charge of.


Sisteract
by Socialist Hippie on Jan. 10, 2013 at 10:31 AM

The first obvious question is whether human societies can ever really successfully govern themselves on scales so much more massive than their "monkeyspheres." 


I do not believe so. It's why we need rules and regulations- It's why we need to tell companies that they can not foul the air, soil or water, and that child labor or 23 hour work days are inappropriate. Left to their own devices, over time, most companies will put profit over doing what is right-

Meadowchik
by Gold Member on Jan. 10, 2013 at 10:35 AM

 

Quoting romalove:


Quoting Meadowchik:

 

Quoting romalove:

I read it, all of it.

I struggled with parts of it.  I mean, I'm not a person who sees everyone outside my "monkeysphere" as faceless.  I have told restaurants when they undercharged me, I wouldn't think of stealing cable, etc.  I don't live to get over on someone else.  I'm a very ethical businessperson, bending over backwards to where I will cheat myself before a worker or a client.  

Ditto.

Having said that, yeah, I care more when someone I know dies than when strangers in China die.  I have empathy and compassion for other people's tragedies but when it hits home of course it is different.

Same here.

My question for you is, what made you think to post this?  :-)

I brought it to the Politics Group sorta as a spin-off of Clairwil's post about defining human life.  But IMO the concept has an even broader application than the abortion topic, regarding politics.  The first obvious question is whether human societies can ever really successfully govern themselves on scales so much more massive than their "monkeyspheres." That's a start.

 

Hmmmm

Well, we have local, state and then federal governments.

You would think within those groupings you could see differences, wouldn't you, in how effectively they govern based on those monkeyspheres.

How would you quantify those groupings to figure out if it holds true?

Small towns to small towns?

How big the town is before it changes?

Differences state to federal?

Congress.....representatives run every two years and have their much smaller districts.  Senators from states have much larger amounts of people to be in charge of.


I've mentioned this before, but I have seen the difference between a school system being controlled nationally/regionally vs being controlled locally.  I am ready to spit nails about the bureacracy of our current school system in France.  On the other hand, I miss the Swiss experience, even though the local laws prohibited some things I favor, in the sum total they seemed to do a much better job because they were in charge.

Meadowchik
by Gold Member on Jan. 10, 2013 at 10:37 AM

 "Govern themselves" refers to representative government, like the USA has now.

Quoting Sisteract:

The first obvious question is whether human societies can ever really successfully govern themselves on scales so much more massive than their "monkeyspheres." 

 

I do not believe so. It's why we need rules and regulations- It's why we need to tell companies that they can not foul the air, soil or water, and that child labor or 23 hour work days are inappropriate. Left to their own devices, over time, most companies will put profit over doing what is right-

 

romalove
by SenseandSensibility on Jan. 10, 2013 at 10:37 AM


Quoting Meadowchik:

 

Quoting romalove:


Quoting Meadowchik:

 

Quoting romalove:

I read it, all of it.

I struggled with parts of it.  I mean, I'm not a person who sees everyone outside my "monkeysphere" as faceless.  I have told restaurants when they undercharged me, I wouldn't think of stealing cable, etc.  I don't live to get over on someone else.  I'm a very ethical businessperson, bending over backwards to where I will cheat myself before a worker or a client.  

Ditto.

Having said that, yeah, I care more when someone I know dies than when strangers in China die.  I have empathy and compassion for other people's tragedies but when it hits home of course it is different.

Same here.

My question for you is, what made you think to post this?  :-)

I brought it to the Politics Group sorta as a spin-off of Clairwil's post about defining human life.  But IMO the concept has an even broader application than the abortion topic, regarding politics.  The first obvious question is whether human societies can ever really successfully govern themselves on scales so much more massive than their "monkeyspheres." That's a start.

 

Hmmmm

Well, we have local, state and then federal governments.

You would think within those groupings you could see differences, wouldn't you, in how effectively they govern based on those monkeyspheres.

How would you quantify those groupings to figure out if it holds true?

Small towns to small towns?

How big the town is before it changes?

Differences state to federal?

Congress.....representatives run every two years and have their much smaller districts.  Senators from states have much larger amounts of people to be in charge of.


I've mentioned this before, but I have seen the difference between a school system being controlled nationally/regionally vs being controlled locally.  I am ready to spit nails about the bureacracy of our current school system in France.  On the other hand, I miss the Swiss experience, even though the local laws prohibited some things I favor, in the sum total they seemed to do a much better job because they were in charge.

What is the French system like?

Meadowchik
by Gold Member on Jan. 10, 2013 at 10:45 AM

 

Quoting romalove:

What is the French system like?

Bigger classes, less teachers.  Lots of red tape. Here, you don't just go register at your local school, you have to go through regional authorities, and that goes for many kinds of changes.  Regional authorities, people who had never met me or my kids, made specific decisions about my daughter's education with very little notice. 

Swiss schools had smaller classes and more individual attention and communication.  The principal could make decisions, and/or exceptions on a case-by-case basis.  There was always a rationale for decisions, not a pass-the-buck schpiel.

romalove
by SenseandSensibility on Jan. 10, 2013 at 10:47 AM


Quoting Meadowchik:

 

Quoting romalove:

What is the French system like?

Bigger classes, less teachers.  Lots of red tape. Here, you don't just go register at your local school, you have to go through regional authorities, and that goes for many kinds of changes.  Regional authorities, people who had never met me or my kids, made specific decisions about my daughter's education with very little notice. 

Swiss schools had smaller classes and more individual attention and communication.  The principal could make decisions, and/or exceptions on a case-by-case basis.  There was always a rationale for decisions, not a pass-the-buck schpiel.

Which school system has better educational ratings?  Is the education in those countries relatively uniform or is it like America where depending on where you live it can be great or terrible?

Sisteract
by Socialist Hippie on Jan. 10, 2013 at 11:05 AM
Some good points made, but at times it almost seems like the premise is being used as an excuse for accepting bad behaviors.
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