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Texas Schools Teaching that Judaism is ‘Incomplete' and Africans Were ‘Cursed' (Video)

Posted by on Jan. 23, 2013 at 9:29 AM
  • 34 Replies

 

Texas Schools Teaching that Judaism is ‘Incomplete' and Africans Were ‘Cursed' (Video)

 

AATTP Texas Schools

A new report titled, Reading, Writing and Religion II, distributed by the Texas Freedom Network Education Fund reveals that publicly funded schools in Texas are teaching from an evangelical, conservative Christian  perspective.  The study, conducted by Mark A. Chancey who is a Professor of Religious Studies at Southern Methodist University, cites examples of lessons that are rooted in fundamentalist dogma, include instructing children that the Earth is approximately 6,000 years old, Judaism is a "flawed and incomplete religion" and Africans are decedents of Ham who were cursed by Noah, a story that has been used to justify racism in the past.

Other disturbing lessons include:

• The United States is a Christian nation founded on biblical principles

• The Bible is literally true

• Christians will be "raptured"

• Watching an episode of the television series "Ancient Aliens" which is presented as a "historic documentary"

Public School Bible Courses

Bible courses can be an effective way to teach public school students about the importance of religion in history and literature. However, Bible courses in public schools must be taught in an academic, non-devotional manner that refrains from promoting or disparaging religion or promotiong one particular faith perspective over all others. Many courses fail this most basic test and jeopardize the religious freedom of students. Below are original reports from the TFN Education Fund that reveal how challenging it is to create courses that are both legally and ethically appropriate as well as academically sound.

Dotted HR President Email

 

2013 Bible Report Cover

 

Latest Report:
Reading, Writing & Religion II (2013)

Reading, Writing & Religion II: Texas Public School Bible Courses in 2011-12 documents a widespread failure to implement key guidelines passed by the Legislature in 2007 to improve the academic quality and legal status of Bible courses in Texas public schools.

This report by Mark Chancey, a professor of religious studies at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, reveals that at least 57 school districts and three charter schools in the state taught courses about the Bible in 2011-12. That's more than double the 25 school districts teaching such courses in the 2006-06 school year. In 2007 the Texas Legislature passed House Bill 1287, which included guidelines designed to improve the quality of such courses while protecting the religious freedom of students and their families.The new report shows that state agencies and many local school districts have largely ignored those guidelines.

The report is based on information obtained from requests to school districts under the Texas Public Information Act. Those requests asked for copies of instructional materials, records related to teacher training and other relevant documents regarding Bible courses taught in the districts' schools.

Key findings in the report:

  • Many Bible course teachers lack the proper training required by the Legislature. Moreover, curriculum standards adopted by the State Board of Education are far too broad to help school districts create academically sound and legally appropriate courses. Consequently, many courses are not academically rigorous and include numerous errors, distortions and other problems.
  • Many Bible courses reflect the religious beliefs of the teachers and sectarian instructional materials they use in their classrooms. In every course in which religious bias is present, instruction reflects a Protestant -- most often a conservative Protestant -- perspective, including a literal interpretation of the Bible.
  • Many courses teach students to interpret the Bible and even Judaism through a distinctly Christian lens. Anti-Jewish bias -- sometimes intentional but often not -- is not uncommon.
  • A number of courses and their instructional materials incorporate pseudo-scholarship, including claims that the Bible provides scientific proof of a 6,000-year-old Earth (young Earth creationism) and that the United States was founded as a Christian nation based on biblical Christian principles. At least one district's Bible course includes materials suggesting that the origins of racial diversity among humans today can be traced back to a curse placed on Noah's son in the biblical story of the flood. Such claims have long been a foundational component of some forms of racism.
  • Despite the state's failure to implement HB 1287 effectively, a number of school districts did succeed in offering Bible courses that largely comply with legal and constitutional requirements, are academically serious and avoid many of the serious problems noted in most other districts. These successful courses can be found in urban, suburban and rural districts.

Texas Public School Bible Classes: ‘Theories of Creation’

Today we offer another example of what Texas students are learning in their public school Bible classes. A number of these classes incorporate pseudoscience, especially when it comes to promoting creationism. Suggestions that the biblical creation story is literally true are not uncommon. Neither are attempts to show that the Bible’s account can be reconciled with modern science.

In this example from the Texas Freedom Network Education Fund’s new report, Reading, Writing & Religion II: Texas Public School Bible Courses in 2011-12by Prof. Mark Chancey at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, students in the Ector County Independent School District in Odessa are asked to match the theories on the left with the descriptions on the right.

TheoriesOfCreation

It’s one thing to teach students in such classes that some people believe the Bible’s creation story is true but that such views are not shared by others. But that’s not what this Ector County exercise is doing. This exercise presumes the biblical creation story is true while suggesting that there are valid “theories” about the specifics. Moreover, scientific theories about the formation of the universe and about the development of life on Earth are simply ignored. This exercise might have a place in a Sunday School classroom, but not in a public school. And it’s certainly out of place in a truly academic study of the influence of the Bible in history and literature.

The TFN Education Fund’s new report includes many other examples of serious flaws in Texas public school Bible courses. You can read a short overview of the report here. Read what some Texas courses teach about race and Judaism and how they portray the Bible as “one of the most accurate history books in the world.”

The new report and other TFN Education Fund reports on public school Bible courses are here.

by on Jan. 23, 2013 at 9:29 AM
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Replies (1-10):
Raintree
by Silver Member on Jan. 23, 2013 at 9:49 AM
1 mom liked this

I'm very concerned about this. Personally concerned.

mikiemom
by Silver Member on Jan. 23, 2013 at 9:58 AM
3 moms liked this

Our country is falling deeper and deeper into ruin because our society refuses to ensure our children get sound educations rooted in truth and reality.

sweet-a-kins
by Ruby Member on Jan. 23, 2013 at 10:09 AM
1 mom liked this

 This is the kind of insidious indoctrination that swells the number of hate groups...

Quoting Raintree:

I'm very concerned about this. Personally concerned.

 

SEEKEROFSHELLS
by Member on Jan. 23, 2013 at 10:18 AM

 I thought this would be for Christian schools. This is course material for public schools. I went to the link and I think some statements need to be set with examples. Other things the link states are clearly disturbing to me.

sweet-a-kins
by Ruby Member on Jan. 23, 2013 at 10:30 AM

 

Texas Public School Bible Classes: ‘Theories of Creation’

Today we offer another example of what Texas students are learning in their public school Bible classes. A number of these classes incorporate pseudoscience, especially when it comes to promoting creationism. Suggestions that the biblical creation story is literally true are not uncommon. Neither are attempts to show that the Bible’s account can be reconciled with modern science.

In this example from the Texas Freedom Network Education Fund’s new report, Reading, Writing & Religion II: Texas Public School Bible Courses in 2011-12by Prof. Mark Chancey at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, students in the Ector County Independent School District in Odessa are asked to match the theories on the left with the descriptions on the right.

TheoriesOfCreation

It’s one thing to teach students in such classes that some people believe the Bible’s creation story is true but that such views are not shared by others. But that’s not what this Ector County exercise is doing. This exercise presumes the biblical creation story is true while suggesting that there are valid “theories” about the specifics. Moreover, scientific theories about the formation of the universe and about the development of life on Earth are simply ignored. This exercise might have a place in a Sunday School classroom, but not in a public school. And it’s certainly out of place in a truly academic study of the influence of the Bible in history and literature.

The TFN Education Fund’s new report includes many other examples of serious flaws in Texas public school Bible courses. You can read a short overview of the report here. Read what some Texas courses teach about race and Judaism and how they portray the Bible as “one of the most accurate history books in the world.”

The new report and other TFN Education Fund reports on public school Bible courses are here.

sweet-a-kins
by Ruby Member on Jan. 23, 2013 at 10:31 AM

 

Public School Bible Courses

Bible courses can be an effective way to teach public school students about the importance of religion in history and literature. However, Bible courses in public schools must be taught in an academic, non-devotional manner that refrains from promoting or disparaging religion or promotiong one particular faith perspective over all others. Many courses fail this most basic test and jeopardize the religious freedom of students. Below are original reports from the TFN Education Fund that reveal how challenging it is to create courses that are both legally and ethically appropriate as well as academically sound.

Dotted HR President Email

2013 Bible Report Cover

 

Latest Report:
Reading, Writing & Religion II (2013)

Reading, Writing & Religion II: Texas Public School Bible Courses in 2011-12 documents a widespread failure to implement key guidelines passed by the Legislature in 2007 to improve the academic quality and legal status of Bible courses in Texas public schools.

This report by Mark Chancey, a professor of religious studies at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, reveals that at least 57 school districts and three charter schools in the state taught courses about the Bible in 2011-12. That's more than double the 25 school districts teaching such courses in the 2006-06 school year. In 2007 the Texas Legislature passed House Bill 1287, which included guidelines designed to improve the quality of such courses while protecting the religious freedom of students and their families.The new report shows that state agencies and many local school districts have largely ignored those guidelines.

The report is based on information obtained from requests to school districts under the Texas Public Information Act. Those requests asked for copies of instructional materials, records related to teacher training and other relevant documents regarding Bible courses taught in the districts' schools.

Key findings in the report:

  • Many Bible course teachers lack the proper training required by the Legislature. Moreover, curriculum standards adopted by the State Board of Education are far too broad to help school districts create academically sound and legally appropriate courses. Consequently, many courses are not academically rigorous and include numerous errors, distortions and other problems.
  • Many Bible courses reflect the religious beliefs of the teachers and sectarian instructional materials they use in their classrooms. In every course in which religious bias is present, instruction reflects a Protestant -- most often a conservative Protestant -- perspective, including a literal interpretation of the Bible.
  • Many courses teach students to interpret the Bible and even Judaism through a distinctly Christian lens. Anti-Jewish bias -- sometimes intentional but often not -- is not uncommon.
  • A number of courses and their instructional materials incorporate pseudo-scholarship, including claims that the Bible provides scientific proof of a 6,000-year-old Earth (young Earth creationism) and that the United States was founded as a Christian nation based on biblical Christian principles. At least one district's Bible course includes materials suggesting that the origins of racial diversity among humans today can be traced back to a curse placed on Noah's son in the biblical story of the flood. Such claims have long been a foundational component of some forms of racism.
  • Despite the state's failure to implement HB 1287 effectively, a number of school districts did succeed in offering Bible courses that largely comply with legal and constitutional requirements, are academically serious and avoid many of the serious problems noted in most other districts. These successful courses can be found in urban, suburban and rural districts.
LucyMom08
by Silver Member on Jan. 23, 2013 at 1:00 PM

 Oh Texas...no wonder your stats are so depressing...way to go? Wonder how getting rid of critical thinking skills will play out in the future, for these poor children?

mikiemom
by Silver Member on Jan. 23, 2013 at 2:01 PM

 

How very racist of you. Resources that our society is not willing to spend on our children. Allowing idiots to homeschool is another problem and yes allowing jacked up religious fundemental bullshit such as creation and hatred towards other races is major flaw in our education system.

Quoting Imacakebaker:

Sure, that's why schools in promidantly white areas do well, and the ones in the ghetto don't.  That's why white kids score higher than their brown counterparts.  Its all because of evil Chrisitianity and not that one group for the most part is more involved and stable than the other.  Sure.  If Mom doesn't care what the her child is doing in school, why is throwing money at the school the answer?  

Quoting mikiemom:

 

Nice try- schools are in decline because as a society we don't want to put the resources into them that are needed.

Quoting Imacakebaker:

Really, Christians are the decline, or single moms popping out kids in the ghetto who have several baby daddies who aren't involved, never read to their kids, who don't give a crap.

It isn't gangs, drugs and crime.. NOPE schools are declining because of Christians.  How stupid are you?

Quoting mikiemom:

Our country is falling deeper and deeper into ruin because our society refuses to ensure our children get sound educations rooted in truth and reality.


 

 



 

brandydesiree
by Bronze Member on Jan. 23, 2013 at 2:04 PM
3 moms liked this

I am against this in public schools, simply because of the diversity of cultures there. However, I disagree that it the fall of public schools. The majority of private schools in this country are Christian backed and most require Christian based religious classes. Last I checked, they tend to score exponentially better in testing and have a higher percentage of success in secondary education, than their public school counterparts. So, I am on the fence here. I don't think the classes do any harm as long as they are elective and not required, but I think it would be better if they left religion up to the parents.

Imacakebaker
by on Jan. 23, 2013 at 2:06 PM
4 moms liked this

Stating a fact is not racist.

The state of Florida even lowered standards for AA children because they couldn't pass tests. That's not a money issues, its a parenting issue.

Home schooled children do better on tests and are usually above grade level in most subjects.  Homeschooling and Christianity are not the issue in our schools.  Lazy parents are the issue who don't give a crap about what their kids are doing in school.

Nice try.  Wanna try again?

Quoting mikiemom:


How very racist of you. Resources that our society is not willing to spend on our children. Allowing idiots to homeschool is another problem and yes allowing jacked up religious fundemental bullshit such as creation and hatred towards other races is major flaw in our education system.

Quoting Imacakebaker:

Sure, that's why schools in promidantly white areas do well, and the ones in the ghetto don't.  That's why white kids score higher than their brown counterparts.  Its all because of evil Chrisitianity and not that one group for the most part is more involved and stable than the other.  Sure.  If Mom doesn't care what the her child is doing in school, why is throwing money at the school the answer?  

Quoting mikiemom:


Nice try- schools are in decline because as a society we don't want to put the resources into them that are needed.

Quoting Imacakebaker:

Really, Christians are the decline, or single moms popping out kids in the ghetto who have several baby daddies who aren't involved, never read to their kids, who don't give a crap.

It isn't gangs, drugs and crime.. NOPE schools are declining because of Christians.  How stupid are you?

Quoting mikiemom:

Our country is falling deeper and deeper into ruin because our society refuses to ensure our children get sound educations rooted in truth and reality.








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