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Stacey Campfield, Tennessee GOP Lawmaker, Wants To Tie Welfare Benefits To Children's Grades

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Stacey Campfield, Tennessee GOP Lawmaker, Wants To Tie Welfare Benefits To Children's Grades



Tennessee state Rep. Stacey Campfield (R) introduced a bill this week seeking to make welfare benefits contingent upon the grades of a would-be recipient's children.
Campfield's legislation, filed Thursday, would "require the reduction of Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF) payments for parents or caretakers of TANF recipients whose children fail to maintain satisfactory progress in school." TANF is more commonly referred to as welfare.
Under Campfield's bill, welfare recipients would face a loss of benefits if their children showed poor academic performance. It's unclear how these factors would be tied to one another, or how the children's performance would be assessed.
In a blog addressing his proposal, Campfield calls his bill a measure to "break the cycle of poverty." According to Campfield, education is a "three legged stool" comprised of schools, teachers and parents. He claims the state has adequately held the first two legs of the school accountable, but argues that it should apply more pressure on the third.
"The third leg of the stool (probably the most important leg) is the parents," Campfield writes. "We have done little to hold them accountable for their child's performance. What my bill would do is put some responsibility on parents for their child's performance."
Campfield has been a pioneer of creative ways to target beneficiaries of entitlement programs in the past. He was a driving force behind failed efforts to require Tennesseeans seeking government benefits to first pass drug tests.
He was also the legislator behind Tennessee's controversial and ill-fated "don't say gay bill" in early 2012.
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by on Jan. 25, 2013 at 7:38 PM
Replies (21-30):
SallyMJ
by Ruby Member on Jan. 27, 2013 at 1:38 AM
1 mom liked this

Please -  Enlighten me about my so-called "stereotypes".

My own teaching experience = fact

My friend's experience = fact

Asian highest ranking in education in the US = fact

What other "stereotypes" are you referring to in my comment? Thanks.

Quoting mommygiggles317:


Quoting SallyMJ:

Makes sense to me.

When I taught in inner city schools, the biggest problem for my students was indifference of many parents to their children's education. Kids whose parents were involved tended to achieve better in school. That isn't the case for most kids there, and that indifference can lead to a downward spiral of poverty.

A friend of mine made an interesting observation (he is black). He went to an inner city public library, and saw lots of black kids sitting around and playing outside. Inside, Asian moms in that same inner city library were working with their kids on their homework. A huge disparity.

Any wonder that Americans of Asian descent have by far the highest test scores, college attendance and career success of any ethnic group in the country? 

Parental involvement in their children's education absolutely is a key factor to their success in life.

Damn... your response is laced with so many stereotypes I don't know where to begin...

Why do you feel that the parents are indifferent to their children's education? Did you ever think about the fact that a lot of these parents have to work?... Some are working more than one job? How about the fact that maybe both mom and dad may be working hard because the bills have to be paid?... the cost of living is going up and wages are not. 

What you may see as "indifference" may be parents doing everything in their power to keep a roof over their families heads, food in their children's bellies etc... They may not have the time to be as involved as parents who are financially more stable - and if you worked in an inner city/low-income school and you did not have a biased attitude - you could vouch for that because you know... right?... 



LIMom1105
by on Jan. 27, 2013 at 8:31 AM

ITA. They are also less likely to be diagnosed with special needs or learning disabilities, thus earning lower grades in all likelihood. 

Ridiculous idea.

Quoting PamR:

I won't argue that children do better when parents are involved, however, you need to look at the circumstances that a lot of these children are growing up in.  Not only are they more likely to attend poor performing schools, they are more likely to have parents with limited education (and therefore, a more limited ability to help with schoolwork), and single parent families where the parent is working and not necessarily home to help out as much.  And if you aren't getting enough to eat, you perform more poorly in school.  This is just stupid and punishing children just makes no sense. 

What does he define as satisfactory grades in school?


romalove
by SenseandSensibility on Jan. 27, 2013 at 8:40 AM
2 moms liked this

http://www.fairtaxation.org/facts/sinking.php


PUBLIC INVESTMENT:

  • 43rd in financial commitment to public health (per person)
  • 44th in financial commitment to elementary and secondary school (per student)
  • 48th in financial commitment to higher education by state and local government (per person)

OVERALL RETURN ON INVESTMENT:

  • 45th safest state
  • 47th healthiest state
  • 47th most livable state

INVESTMENT RETURNS (IN PAINFUL DETAIL):

  • 41st in children living above the national poverty line
  • 41st in percent of 4th graders who read at a 4th grade level
  • 46th in percent of 4th graders who can do 4th grade math
  • 41st in percent of population who graduated from college
  • 42ndin high school graduation rates
  • 42nd in citizens living above the national poverty line
  • 44th in higher education enrollment
  • 46th in seniors living above the national poverty line

WHAT TENNESSEE DOES WELL:

  • 6th in children living in extreme poverty
  • 10th in young adults not attending school. not working, and with no degree beyond high school
  • 3rd in meth lab incidents
  • 5th in percent of adults overweight or obese
  • 8th in grandchildren in the care of grandparents


Tennessee is in a world of hurt.

momtoscott
by on Jan. 27, 2013 at 9:59 AM

 Bad bill, I hope it doesn't pass.   

Raintree
by Silver Member on Jan. 27, 2013 at 10:41 AM
4 moms liked this

Sally, I understand what you're saying- as a wife to an asian American, I have first hand knowledge of the amount of pressure put on Asian children to perform well in school (and I'm not saying that pressure is always a bad thing). WIth regard to the idea that the "Asian mothers are in the library helping their kids with homework'" thing that you posited, I'd like to ask one small little question:

Many people who partake of welfare benefits ARE working. When will they have time to do this?

Perhaps if we didn't have such a huge class of working poor- if our companies and their record profits would supply some kind of livable wage? This problem would decline.

This isn't just a race issue.

Quoting SallyMJ:

Please -  Enlighten me about my so-called "stereotypes".

My own teaching experience = fact

My friend's experience = fact

Asian highest ranking in education in the US = fact

What other "stereotypes" are you referring to in my comment? Thanks.

Quoting mommygiggles317:


Quoting SallyMJ:

Makes sense to me.

When I taught in inner city schools, the biggest problem for my students was indifference of many parents to their children's education. Kids whose parents were involved tended to achieve better in school. That isn't the case for most kids there, and that indifference can lead to a downward spiral of poverty.

A friend of mine made an interesting observation (he is black). He went to an inner city public library, and saw lots of black kids sitting around and playing outside. Inside, Asian moms in that same inner city library were working with their kids on their homework. A huge disparity.

Any wonder that Americans of Asian descent have by far the highest test scores, college attendance and career success of any ethnic group in the country? 

Parental involvement in their children's education absolutely is a key factor to their success in life.

Damn... your response is laced with so many stereotypes I don't know where to begin...

Why do you feel that the parents are indifferent to their children's education? Did you ever think about the fact that a lot of these parents have to work?... Some are working more than one job? How about the fact that maybe both mom and dad may be working hard because the bills have to be paid?... the cost of living is going up and wages are not. 

What you may see as "indifference" may be parents doing everything in their power to keep a roof over their families heads, food in their children's bellies etc... They may not have the time to be as involved as parents who are financially more stable - and if you worked in an inner city/low-income school and you did not have a biased attitude - you could vouch for that because you know... right?... 




shannonnigans
by Bronze Member on Jan. 27, 2013 at 10:54 AM
3 moms liked this
"Why are you homeless?" "Well, after my husband left us high and dry, my son screwed us by doing lousy on his multiplication tables. He missed 9 x 6 so here we are."

Easily the dumbest proposal I've ever heard. Well, apart from stereotyping scholastic success by race and ethnicity.
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
shannonnigans
by Bronze Member on Jan. 27, 2013 at 10:56 AM
2 moms liked this
Seriously, these are Deliverance type numbers...


Quoting romalove:

http://www.fairtaxation.org/facts/sinking.php


PUBLIC INVESTMENT:

  • 43rd in financial commitment to public health (per person)
  • 44th in financial commitment to elementary and secondary school (per student)
  • 48th in financial commitment to higher education by state and local government (per person)

OVERALL RETURN ON INVESTMENT:

  • 45th safest state
  • 47th healthiest state
  • 47th most livable state

INVESTMENT RETURNS (IN PAINFUL DETAIL):

  • 41st in children living above the national poverty line
  • 41st in percent of 4th graders who read at a 4th grade level
  • 46th in percent of 4th graders who can do 4th grade math
  • 41st in percent of population who graduated from college
  • 42ndin high school graduation rates
  • 42nd in citizens living above the national poverty line
  • 44th in higher education enrollment
  • 46th in seniors living above the national poverty line

WHAT TENNESSEE DOES WELL:

  • 6th in children living in extreme poverty
  • 10th in young adults not attending school. not working, and with no degree beyond high school
  • 3rd in meth lab incidents
  • 5th in percent of adults overweight or obese
  • 8th in grandchildren in the care of grandparents


Tennessee is in a world of hurt.


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Raintree
by Silver Member on Jan. 27, 2013 at 11:02 AM
3 moms liked this

pretty bad.

Quoting shannonnigans:

Seriously, these are Deliverance type numbers...


Quoting romalove:

http://www.fairtaxation.org/facts/sinking.php


PUBLIC INVESTMENT:

  • 43rd in financial commitment to public health (per person)
  • 44th in financial commitment to elementary and secondary school (per student)
  • 48th in financial commitment to higher education by state and local government (per person)

OVERALL RETURN ON INVESTMENT:

  • 45th safest state
  • 47th healthiest state
  • 47th most livable state

INVESTMENT RETURNS (IN PAINFUL DETAIL):

  • 41st in children living above the national poverty line
  • 41st in percent of 4th graders who read at a 4th grade level
  • 46th in percent of 4th graders who can do 4th grade math
  • 41st in percent of population who graduated from college
  • 42ndin high school graduation rates
  • 42nd in citizens living above the national poverty line
  • 44th in higher education enrollment
  • 46th in seniors living above the national poverty line

WHAT TENNESSEE DOES WELL:

  • 6th in children living in extreme poverty
  • 10th in young adults not attending school. not working, and with no degree beyond high school
  • 3rd in meth lab incidents
  • 5th in percent of adults overweight or obese
  • 8th in grandchildren in the care of grandparents


Tennessee is in a world of hurt.



stringtheory
by Bronze Member on Jan. 27, 2013 at 11:06 AM
1 mom liked this
That is an awful lot of pressure to put on kids. Stress like that does NOT help improve performance.
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stringtheory
by Bronze Member on Jan. 27, 2013 at 11:08 AM
2 moms liked this
I'm betting Campfield doesn't give a whoot about poor kids breaking any cycles by doing well in school; likely he's banking on these numbers to save some money on PA.

Quoting romalove:

http://www.fairtaxation.org/facts/sinking.php


PUBLIC INVESTMENT:

  • 43rd in financial commitment to public health (per person)
  • 44th in financial commitment to elementary and secondary school (per student)
  • 48th in financial commitment to higher education by state and local government (per person)

OVERALL RETURN ON INVESTMENT:

  • 45th safest state
  • 47th healthiest state
  • 47th most livable state

INVESTMENT RETURNS (IN PAINFUL DETAIL):

  • 41st in children living above the national poverty line
  • 41st in percent of 4th graders who read at a 4th grade level
  • 46th in percent of 4th graders who can do 4th grade math
  • 41st in percent of population who graduated from college
  • 42ndin high school graduation rates
  • 42nd in citizens living above the national poverty line
  • 44th in higher education enrollment
  • 46th in seniors living above the national poverty line

WHAT TENNESSEE DOES WELL:

  • 6th in children living in extreme poverty
  • 10th in young adults not attending school. not working, and with no degree beyond high school
  • 3rd in meth lab incidents
  • 5th in percent of adults overweight or obese
  • 8th in grandchildren in the care of grandparents


Tennessee is in a world of hurt.

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