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News & Politics News & Politics

'RUNAWAY SLAVE,' OR HOW PROGRESSIVES ROB BLACK CITIZENS OF THEIR AMERICAN DREAMS

Posted by on Feb. 12, 2013 at 4:38 PM
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1 mom liked this



(Rev. C.L. Bryant's new film, Runaway Slave, is available now via DVD and Digital Download. The documentary finds Bryant, a former NAACP local chapter president, traveling across the country to explore how the progressive mindset has allowed blacks to trade "one form of tyranny for another").

Bryant shares his story exclusively with Big Hollywood.

Black History Month, though honorable in its concept, has become a tool to patronize a people who seem to be falling further into the abyss of non-participation in the engine that drives American achievement.

While there are many black people whose accomplishments are absolutely incredible in this country, I notice unfortunately, even in the year 2013, anger among black people; anger that I witnessed firsthand in the early '60s, '70s and '80s.

The question I have is, if black folks were angry in the '40s and '50s with little opportunity, no vote, no equal access, why are we still angry today? Why is it on the lips of so many so-called black leaders the idea that we have not overcome?

I am a black southerner born and bred, and I remember Negro Day at the Louisiana State Fair. It was the only day out of a two-week run that Negroes (as we were called then in polite circles) could go to the State Fair. I remember black and white water fountains and public facilities. There is no question that the civil rights movement began at a time in America when people who were true victims of their present circumstances found the courage to escape a system of perpetual bondage.

In retrospect, without the brave men and women of the civil rights struggle of the late '50s and early '60s, it is horrific to think how backward black folks would be at this point in American history.



In my own hometown of Shreveport, LA, Rev. Harry Blake was nearly beaten to death by police. We must ask what was that unseen quality that caused these oppressed people to remain on course even in the face of injustices like police violence. I believe it is called character, and I am convinced as a pastor who has led three churches in 34 years of ministry, when courage is failing, character will not yield. I have found that it takes little courage to complain about what you don’t have. It also takes small determination to be a victim but it takes character to turn a complaint into an effective action and to turn a victim into a victor.

Black folks in America today don’t often see it this way. As a black fiscal conservative and dare I say Republican, I can’t help but make this point: I believe that America is the greatest success story the world has ever known, and the survival of black people in a country that had the harshest form of slavery should naturally be for those grandsons and daughters of former slaves a call to embrace a quality that was in the DNA of a generation gone by but now has been bred out of the mentality of present day blacks by the overreach of what was once legitimately called social justice now called equal outcome.

To desire equal outcome for any length of time is to rob oneself of the character it takes to achieve individually. Dr Martin Luther King, Jr. in his 1963 speech uttered the words of his dream “that one day my four little children will live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character.” How backwards have the mindset of far too many black folks gone from this magnificent dream.

To secure the course plotted for the intended destination of a people we must understand fruit produced by the content of character. The content of character will cause the individual to contribute to his society only expecting to be able compete equally as Dr. King did even in the midst of minimal opportunity. The content of character will open doors that otherwise would remain closed to those trapped in the mindset of being owed a position in modern America because of skin color.

A person's character says to big government,”Get out of my way so I may achieve my individual dream.” The content of character still causes all Runaway Slaves to say in the words of that old Negro spiritual ... free at last.

My grandfather once said to me,”I didn’t go through all that I went through so you could be black. I went through all I went through so you could be free.” These words grow more precious as the years go by.


by on Feb. 12, 2013 at 4:38 PM
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MsDenuninani
by Bronze Member on Feb. 12, 2013 at 4:54 PM
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My grandfather once said to me,”I didn’t go through all that I went through so you could be black. I went through all I went through so you could be free.”  

Are the two mutually exclusive?

'Cause I'm both. 

(And my dream is for this country to get a little more progressive.)  

SallyMJ
by Ruby Member on Feb. 12, 2013 at 4:57 PM
1 mom liked this

So I guess you disagree with these folks.

Freedom of speech is a right for all in the United States of America. Even you. Even me. Even them.

Be glad for what Martin Luther King accomplished for us. And maybe take another look at the kinds of things he said that would make people free.

Quoting MsDenuninani:



My grandfather once said to me,”I didn’t go through all that I went through so you could be black. I went through all I went through so you could be free.”  

Are the two mutually exclusive?

'Cause I'm both. 

(And my dream is for this country to get a little more progressive.)  



rccmom
by Gold Member on Feb. 12, 2013 at 5:45 PM
1 mom liked this

I don't read anything in here that shows Progressives rob anyone, let alone black people, of their dreams.

MsDenuninani
by Bronze Member on Feb. 13, 2013 at 11:33 AM
2 moms liked this

 

Quoting SallyMJ:
 

Be glad for what Martin Luther King accomplished for you.


Actually, I'm grateful for what MLK accomplished for Americans.

SallyMJ
by Ruby Member on Feb. 13, 2013 at 12:32 PM

You are absolutely right!  -  my mistake.

And we all need to learn from and continue what MLK taught. Becoming a slave again to Progressivism is not what he had in mind. Whenever the Derrick Bells and Progressives of the world could have followed in the steps of Martin Luther King, they followed in the steps of Malcolm X and the racist LBJ. Yes, it is ironic.

Quoting MsDenuninani:


Quoting SallyMJ:
 

Be glad for what Martin Luther King accomplished for you.


Actually, I'm grateful for what MLK accomplished for Americans.



MsDenuninani
by Bronze Member on Feb. 13, 2013 at 12:56 PM

Quite honestly, I think it's ironic to hear a modern-day Republican suggesting that we should be continuing in the footsteps of MLK, considering that he spent his last years focusing on poverty (and often unions).  There is ample evidence that he believed that the problems of racism and poverty (and he was also against militarism and materialism) were systemic, which suggests that he and progressivism aren't so much on opposite sides.

Further, I really don't think he would use the term "slave" lightly -- and if he did, it would probably be more in regards to consumerism.  His teachings and writings before his death are pretty articulate on that point.  I know because I have had many disagreements with my friends on that exact subject, since I think consumerism is the backbone of a capitalist country.

In other words, if the Rev here truly believes that being progressive is antithetical to King's values. . .I think that's a misread of King, especially when you look at what he was doing in 1967-1968.

Quoting SallyMJ:

You are absolutely right!  -  my mistake.

And we all need to learn from and continue what MLK taught. Becoming a slave again to Progressivism is not what he had in mind. Whenever the Derrick Bells and Progressives of the world could have followed in the steps of Martin Luther King, they followed in the steps of Malcolm X and the racist LBJ. Yes, it is ironic.

Quoting MsDenuninani:

 

Quoting SallyMJ:
 

Be glad for what Martin Luther King accomplished for you.

 

Actually, I'm grateful for what MLK accomplished for Americans.

 

 


 

brandydesiree
by Bronze Member on Feb. 13, 2013 at 1:13 PM
1 mom liked this
I love a good AA Republican!!!!
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SallyMJ
by Ruby Member on Feb. 13, 2013 at 1:25 PM
2 moms liked this

Are you serious? Why is it "honestly ironic" to suggest we should continue in the footsteps of MLK? It is a good thing for EVERYONE to follow in his footsteps. Just as you said in your previous comment - MLK accomplished great strides for EVERYONE, not just blacks.

Big deal if we may not all agree with all your views or his. Do you really think all Republicans agree on everything? Please. We are not like Democrats who pound identical ideology over the heads of your members. 

And your attempted disparagement that I can't discuss this because I am a conservative who happens to be a registered Republican? Please. So was Martin Luther King and most all historical black leaders, including black Congressmen in the late 1800s - yes, that is correct - until the mid-1960. Republicans, not Democrats, registered blacks to vote. Racist LBJ passed his social programs that he swore would "keep N***ers voting Democrat for 200 years!". Despite Daniel Patrick Moynihan's warnings that these were likely to cause the destruction of the black family. Which they did. And blacks moved over to the Democrat Party in large numbers, where it became much more of a cultural thing than with other ethnic groups.

The black leaders behind this film don't use the term "slave" lightly, and neither do I. It's called a  metaphor. Do you have a problem with other blacks exercising their right to free speech, when their statements do not fit in with your narrative? And why are the most racist Americans ironically black liberals/progressives who disparage black conservatives, black Republicans, and black Democrats who voted for Romney in the last election? Ironic that black liberals have become the new slave owners who metaphorically whip blacks who hold views other than those of the Democrat Media Complex.


Quoting MsDenuninani:

Quite honestly, I think it's ironic to hear a modern-day Republican suggesting that we should be continuing in the footsteps of MLK, considering that he spent his last years focusing on poverty (and often unions).  There is ample evidence that he believed that the problems of racism and poverty (and he was also against militarism and materialism) were systemic, which suggests that he and progressivism aren't so much on opposite sides.

Further, I really don't think he would use the term "slave" lightly -- and if he did, it would probably be more in regards to consumerism.  His teachings and writings before his death are pretty articulate on that point.  I know because I have had many disagreements with my friends on that exact subject, since I think consumerism is the backbone of a capitalist country.

In other words, if the Rev here truly believes that being progressive is antithetical to King's values. . .I think that's a misread of King, especially when you look at what he was doing in 1967-1968.

Quoting SallyMJ:

You are absolutely right!  -  my mistake.

And we all need to learn from and continue what MLK taught. Becoming a slave again to Progressivism is not what he had in mind. Whenever the Derrick Bells and Progressives of the world could have followed in the steps of Martin Luther King, they followed in the steps of Malcolm X and the racist LBJ. Yes, it is ironic.

Quoting MsDenuninani:


Quoting SallyMJ:
 

Be glad for what Martin Luther King accomplished for you.


Actually, I'm grateful for what MLK accomplished for Americans.







Carpy
by Platinum Member on Feb. 13, 2013 at 1:37 PM
4 moms liked this
Progressives need victims for votes. They don't want MLK's dream to exist.
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autodidact
by Silver Member on Feb. 13, 2013 at 1:47 PM


freedom of speech doe not prohibit dissent, which is likewise FoS.

Quoting SallyMJ:

So I guess you disagree with these folks.

Freedom of speech is a right for all in the United States of America. Even you. Even me. Even them.

Be glad for what Martin Luther King accomplished for you. And maybe take another look at the kinds of things he said that would make people free.

Quoting MsDenuninani:



My grandfather once said to me,”I didn’t go through all that I went through so you could be black. I went through all I went through so you could be free.”  

Are the two mutually exclusive?

'Cause I'm both. 

(And my dream is for this country to get a little more progressive.)  








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