Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

News & Politics News & Politics

White liberals tell black lies about civil rights

Posted by on Feb. 15, 2013 at 12:37 PM
  • 31 Replies


7:58 PM 02/13/2013

The 1957 bill was sent to Congress by Eisenhower, passed with the intervention of Vice President Richard Nixon, and opposed exclusively by Democrats. Not “Southern Democrats,” not “conservative Democrats,” but Democrats, such as Wayne Morse of Oregon, Warren Magnuson of Washington, James Murray of Montana, Mike Mansfield of Montana and Joseph O’Mahoney of Wyoming.


With absolutely no evidence (because there is none), Tanenhaus then asserted that Republicans decided “they were not going to be pro-. … They were going to side with the Southern oppressors.” Cretin Matthews seconded this gibberish by saying Nixon was “playing the Southern Strategy electorally with Strom Thurmond and those boys.”

Who exactly does Matthews imagine he means by “Strom Thurmond and those boys”? Every single segregationist in the Senate was a Democrat. Only one of them ever became a Republican: Strom Thurmond.

The rest remained not only Democrats, but quite liberal Democrats. These included such liberal luminaries as Harry Byrd, Robert Byrd, Allen Ellender, Albert Gore Sr., J. William Fulbright, Walter F. George, Russell Long and Richard Russell.

Fulbright was Bill Clinton’s mentor. Gore was “Al Jazeera” Gore’s father. Sam Ervin headed Nixon’s impeachment committee. The segregationists who were in the Senate in the ’50s were rabid Joe McCarthy opponents. In the ’60s, they opposed the Vietnam War and supported LBJ’s Great Society programs. In the ’90s, they got 100 percent ratings from NARAL Pro-Choice America.

These “Southern oppressors” were liberal Democrats when they were racists and remained liberal Democrats after they finally stopped being racists (in public). If Republicans had a racist “Southern strategy,” it didn’t work on the racists.

Nor did Nixon — or Reagan — ever win over segregationist voters. Republicans only began sweeping the South after the segregationists died.

Even as late as 1980, when Reagan won a 44-state landslide, the old segregationists were still voting Democrat. Although Reagan handily won Southern states that had been voting Republican since the ’20s, he barely won — or lost — the Goldwater states.

According to numerous polls, Reagan swept Southern college students, while losing college students in the Northeast. Meanwhile, The Washington Post called the elderly “a bedrock of Carter’s southern base.”

As LBJ explained to fellow Democrats after doing a 180-flip on civil rights as president and pushing the 1964 Civil Rights Act (which resembled the 1957 Civil Rights Act he had gutted as a senator): “I’ll have them niggers voting Democratic for two hundred years.” That’s according to a steward on Air Force One, who overhead him say it.

It’s one thing to rewrite history to say the Holocaust was when the Swedes killed the Jews. But it’s another to say that the Holocaust was when Jews killed the Germans.

That’s how liberals rewrite the history of civil rights in America. For the truth, get “Mugged.”

Ann Coulter is an author and political commentator.

by on Feb. 15, 2013 at 12:37 PM
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Replies (1-10):
Carpy
by Platinum Member on Feb. 15, 2013 at 12:51 PM
4 moms liked this
I love Ann Coulter.
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
sweet-a-kins
by Ruby Member on Feb. 15, 2013 at 12:53 PM
1 mom liked this

 The most ignorant thing you have ever posted

So what happened, Why are MOST OF the racists in the republican party now?

 

 

So, how long until the Republican party is declared a “hate group”? vickie said, on May 31st, 2012 at 9:17 pm. ... The election of this white supremacist, ...

www.splcenter.org/.../longtime-white-​supremacist-to-serve...

More White Supremacists With Ties To Neo-Nazi Groups Elected into the Republican Party ... White Supremacist With Ties To Neo-Nazi Groups Elected To Pennsylvania County ...

tucsoncitizen.com/hispanic-politico/​2012/05/31/more...

White Supremacist Stampede

Jul 4, 2011 8:18 PM EDT

A startling number of white-power candidates are seeking public office. Eve Conant reports on their under-the-radar strategy and David Duke's White House flirtation.

  • Add to the growing list of candidates considering a bid for the GOP presidential nomination in 2012 America's most famous white-power advocate: David Duke.

A former grand wizard of the Ku Klux Klan, member of the Louisiana House of Representatives and Republican executive-committee chairman in his district until 2000, Duke has a significant following online. His videos go viral. This month, he's launching a tour of 25 states to explore how much support he can garner for a potential presidential bid. He hasn't considered running for serious office since the early '90s, when he won nearly 40 percent of the vote in his bid for Louisiana governor. But like many "white civil rights advocates," as he describes himself to The Daily Beast, 2012 is already shaping up to be a pivotal year.

Former (and current) Neo Nazis, Ku Klux Klan members, neo-Confederates, and other representatives of the many wings of the "white nationalist" movement are starting to file paperwork and print campaign literature for offices large and small, pointing to rising unemployment, four years with an African-American president, and rampant illegal immigration as part of a growing mound of evidence that white people need to take a stand.

Most aren't winning-not yet. But they're drawing levels of support that surprise and alarm groups that keep tabs on the white-power movement (members prefer the terms "racial realist" or "white nationalist"). In May, the National Socialist Movement's Jeff Hall hit national headlines in a bizarre tragedy: his murder, allegedly at the hands of his 10-year-old son. But before his death, he had campaigned for a low-level water board position in Riverside, California. The swastika-wearing plumber who patrolled the U.S. border paramilitary-style walked away with almost 30 percent of his community's vote. "That's a sizable amount of the vote for a person running openly as a Neo Nazi," says Marilyn Mayo, co-director of the Anti-Defamation League's Center on Extremism.  While Hall's political future-and life-has been cut short, Mayo points out that we should expect more white supremacist hopefuls next year.

Mayo and others date the current spike to 2008, and the election of the country's first African-American president (an historic marker accompanied by a surge in the percentage of U.S. children born to minorities in 2008-48 percent, compared to 37 percent in 1990). "The immediate reaction after Obama was elected was of rage. They feel if a black man can get elected to office, why can't someone who represents white interests?" Just a few weeks after Obama's election, Duke gathered followers in Memphis to expressly strategize what to do next. The solution? If you can't beat ‘em, join ‘em. 

Billy Roper, David Duke

Billy Roper, at the White Heritage Days Festival (left) on September 18, 2004. Former Ku Klux Klan leader and congressional candidate David Duke speaks on "Meet the Press." March 28, 1999 (right). (Photos from left: David S. Holloway / Getty Images; Richard Ellis / Getty Images)

What followed in 2010, say extremism watchers, was the biggest electoral push by white supremacists in years. "We've seen increasing numbers of white supremacists and others on the radical right running for electoral office for several years now and we likely had more in the last election than in any other in recent memory," says Mark Potok of the Southern Poverty Law Center. "Although extremely few of these people are elected, especially if their views become known during the campaign, the fact that there are so many openly running for public office reflects the growth of white nationalism over the last 10 years."

Potok's group tracked 23 candidates in 2010 with radical right-wing views, nine of whom they described as white supremacists or white nationalists. (The others had extreme immigration and world-conspiracy views but did not specifically have links to white organizations.) One candidate, the neo-Confederate Loy Mauch, won a seat in the Arkansas House of Representatives, and another, James C. Russell, who has denounced interracial marriage, garnered 37 percent of the vote in his quest for the New York House of Representatives. Some candidates benefited from a new umbrella organization-the A3P, or American Third Position-which was launched in 2010 by a handful of wonkish-looking professors and corporate lawyers to, as they wrote in their mission statement, "represent the political interests of White Americans." One of their political hopefuls, Atlee Yarrow, who has filed paperwork to run for Florida governor in 2014, says the Southern Poverty Law Center has listed A3P as a hate group "but it has open membership that mirrors the NAACP. They can have identity politics, but if white people do, it's considered racist."

LINK

White liberals tell black lies about civil rights

SallyMJ
by Ruby Member on Feb. 15, 2013 at 1:46 PM

BUMP!

SallyMJ
by Ruby Member on Feb. 15, 2013 at 4:42 PM
5 moms liked this

Why sweet-a-kins,

Thank you so much - I wear your racist epithet as a badge of pride! As do all conservatives unjustly labeled as such.

Did you even read the OP? Republicans have always been the party of individual rights, and pushed through all of the Civil Rights acts in the past 150 years.

The Democrat Party is filled with racists and race-baiters - not toward their own, but toward conservatives. The most viciously hit victims of liberal racism are conservatives of color, especially black conservatives. You can't deny that. And libs love to volley slander of racism at conservatives of any kind.

BTW, white supremacists are not conservatives.  Actually they are more similar to the KKK, a Democrat group.

Nice try.

Quoting sweet-a-kins:

 The most ignorant thing you have ever posted

So what happened, Why are MOST OF the racists in the republican party now?

 

 

So, how long until the Republican party is declared a “hate group”? vickie said, on May 31st, 2012 at 9:17 pm. ... The election of this white supremacist, ...

www.splcenter.org/.../longtime-white-​supremacist-to-serve...

More White Supremacists With Ties To Neo-Nazi Groups Elected into the Republican Party ... White Supremacist With Ties To Neo-Nazi Groups Elected To Pennsylvania County ...

tucsoncitizen.com/hispanic-politico/​2012/05/31/more...

White Supremacist Stampede

Jul 4, 2011 8:18 PM EDT

A startling number of white-power candidates are seeking public office. Eve Conant reports on their under-the-radar strategy and David Duke's White House flirtation.

  • Add to the growing list of candidates considering a bid for the GOP presidential nomination in 2012 America's most famous white-power advocate: David Duke.

A former grand wizard of the Ku Klux Klan, member of the Louisiana House of Representatives and Republican executive-committee chairman in his district until 2000, Duke has a significant following online. His videos go viral. This month, he's launching a tour of 25 states to explore how much support he can garner for a potential presidential bid. He hasn't considered running for serious office since the early '90s, when he won nearly 40 percent of the vote in his bid for Louisiana governor. But like many "white civil rights advocates," as he describes himself to The Daily Beast, 2012 is already shaping up to be a pivotal year.

Former (and current) Neo Nazis, Ku Klux Klan members, neo-Confederates, and other representatives of the many wings of the "white nationalist" movement are starting to file paperwork and print campaign literature for offices large and small, pointing to rising unemployment, four years with an African-American president, and rampant illegal immigration as part of a growing mound of evidence that white people need to take a stand.

Most aren't winning-not yet. But they're drawing levels of support that surprise and alarm groups that keep tabs on the white-power movement (members prefer the terms "racial realist" or "white nationalist"). In May, the National Socialist Movement's Jeff Hall hit national headlines in a bizarre tragedy: his murder, allegedly at the hands of his 10-year-old son. But before his death, he had campaigned for a low-level water board position in Riverside, California. The swastika-wearing plumber who patrolled the U.S. border paramilitary-style walked away with almost 30 percent of his community's vote. "That's a sizable amount of the vote for a person running openly as a Neo Nazi," says Marilyn Mayo, co-director of the Anti-Defamation League's Center on Extremism.  While Hall's political future-and life-has been cut short, Mayo points out that we should expect more white supremacist hopefuls next year.

Mayo and others date the current spike to 2008, and the election of the country's first African-American president (an historic marker accompanied by a surge in the percentage of U.S. children born to minorities in 2008-48 percent, compared to 37 percent in 1990). "The immediate reaction after Obama was elected was of rage. They feel if a black man can get elected to office, why can't someone who represents white interests?" Just a few weeks after Obama's election, Duke gathered followers in Memphis to expressly strategize what to do next. The solution? If you can't beat ‘em, join ‘em. 

Billy Roper, David Duke

Billy Roper, at the White Heritage Days Festival (left) on September 18, 2004. Former Ku Klux Klan leader and congressional candidate David Duke speaks on "Meet the Press." March 28, 1999 (right). (Photos from left: David S. Holloway / Getty Images; Richard Ellis / Getty Images)

What followed in 2010, say extremism watchers, was the biggest electoral push by white supremacists in years. "We've seen increasing numbers of white supremacists and others on the radical right running for electoral office for several years now and we likely had more in the last election than in any other in recent memory," says Mark Potok of the Southern Poverty Law Center. "Although extremely few of these people are elected, especially if their views become known during the campaign, the fact that there are so many openly running for public office reflects the growth of white nationalism over the last 10 years."

Potok's group tracked 23 candidates in 2010 with radical right-wing views, nine of whom they described as white supremacists or white nationalists. (The others had extreme immigration and world-conspiracy views but did not specifically have links to white organizations.) One candidate, the neo-Confederate Loy Mauch, won a seat in the Arkansas House of Representatives, and another, James C. Russell, who has denounced interracial marriage, garnered 37 percent of the vote in his quest for the New York House of Representatives. Some candidates benefited from a new umbrella organization-the A3P, or American Third Position-which was launched in 2010 by a handful of wonkish-looking professors and corporate lawyers to, as they wrote in their mission statement, "represent the political interests of White Americans." One of their political hopefuls, Atlee Yarrow, who has filed paperwork to run for Florida governor in 2014, says the Southern Poverty Law Center has listed A3P as a hate group "but it has open membership that mirrors the NAACP. They can have identity politics, but if white people do, it's considered racist."

LINK

White liberals tell black lies about civil rights



Pema_Jampa
by 2HotTacoTini on Feb. 15, 2013 at 6:14 PM
2 moms liked this

GOP has a race problem.

sweet-a-kins
by Ruby Member on Feb. 15, 2013 at 6:33 PM
1 mom liked this
I didnt call you a racist

The KKK openly states they recruit republicans and tea party members. The time of them being democrats have been over for well over 3 decades

In fact , the Kennedy era really drove the remaining ones right into the Republican Party



Quoting SallyMJ:

Why sweet-a-kins,

Thank you so much - I wear your racist epithet as a badge of pride! As do all conservatives unjustly labeled as such.

Did you even read the OP? Republicans have always been the party of individual rights, and pushed through all of the Civil Rights acts in the past 150 years.

The Democrat Party is filled with racists and race-baiters - not toward their own, but toward conservatives. The most viciously hit victims of liberal racism are conservatives of color, especially black conservatives. You can't deny that. And libs love to volley slander of racism at conservatives of any kind.

BTW, white supremacists are not conservatives.  Actually they are more similar to the KKK, a Democrat group.

Nice try.


Quoting sweet-a-kins:

 The most ignorant thing you have ever posted


So what happened, Why are MOST OF the racists in the republican party now?


 


 



So, how long until the Republican party is declared a “hate group”? vickie said, on May 31st, 2012 at 9:17 pm. ... The election of this white supremacist, ...

www.splcenter.org/.../longtime-white-​supremacist-to-serve...



More White Supremacists With Ties To Neo-Nazi Groups Elected into the Republican Party ... White Supremacist With Ties To Neo-Nazi Groups Elected To Pennsylvania County ...

tucsoncitizen.com/hispanic-politico/​2012/05/31/more...


White Supremacist Stampede


Jul 4, 2011 8:18 PM EDT



A startling number of white-power candidates are seeking public office. Eve Conant reports on their under-the-radar strategy and David Duke's White House flirtation.




  • Add to the growing list of candidates considering a bid for the GOP presidential nomination in 2012 America's most famous white-power advocate: David Duke.



A former grand wizard of the Ku Klux Klan, member of the Louisiana House of Representatives and Republican executive-committee chairman in his district until 2000, Duke has a significant following online. His videos go viral. This month, he's launching a tour of 25 states to explore how much support he can garner for a potential presidential bid. He hasn't considered running for serious office since the early '90s, when he won nearly 40 percent of the vote in his bid for Louisiana governor. But like many "white civil rights advocates," as he describes himself to The Daily Beast, 2012 is already shaping up to be a pivotal year.



Former (and current) Neo Nazis, Ku Klux Klan members, neo-Confederates, and other representatives of the many wings of the "white nationalist" movement are starting to file paperwork and print campaign literature for offices large and small, pointing to rising unemployment, four years with an African-American president, and rampant illegal immigration as part of a growing mound of evidence that white people need to take a stand.

Most aren't winning-not yet. But they're drawing levels of support that surprise and alarm groups that keep tabs on the white-power movement (members prefer the terms "racial realist" or "white nationalist"). In May, the National Socialist Movement's Jeff Hall hit national headlines in a bizarre tragedy: his murder, allegedly at the hands of his 10-year-old son. But before his death, he had campaigned for a low-level water board position in Riverside, California. The swastika-wearing plumber who patrolled the U.S. border paramilitary-style walked away with almost 30 percent of his community's vote. "That's a sizable amount of the vote for a person running openly as a Neo Nazi," says Marilyn Mayo, co-director of the Anti-Defamation League's Center on Extremism.  While Hall's political future-and life-has been cut short, Mayo points out that we should expect more white supremacist hopefuls next year.

Mayo and others date the current spike to 2008, and the election of the country's first African-American president (an historic marker accompanied by a surge in the percentage of U.S. children born to minorities in 2008-48 percent, compared to 37 percent in 1990). "The immediate reaction after Obama was elected was of rage. They feel if a black man can get elected to office, why can't someone who represents white interests?" Just a few weeks after Obama's election, Duke gathered followers in Memphis to expressly strategize what to do next. The solution? If you can't beat ‘em, join ‘em. 

Billy Roper, David Duke

Billy Roper, at the White Heritage Days Festival (left) on September 18, 2004. Former Ku Klux Klan leader and congressional candidate David Duke speaks on "Meet the Press." March 28, 1999 (right). (Photos from left: David S. Holloway / Getty Images; Richard Ellis / Getty Images)



What followed in 2010, say extremism watchers, was the biggest electoral push by white supremacists in years. "We've seen increasing numbers of white supremacists and others on the radical right running for electoral office for several years now and we likely had more in the last election than in any other in recent memory," says Mark Potok of the Southern Poverty Law Center. "Although extremely few of these people are elected, especially if their views become known during the campaign, the fact that there are so many openly running for public office reflects the growth of white nationalism over the last 10 years."



Potok's group tracked 23 candidates in 2010 with radical right-wing views, nine of whom they described as white supremacists or white nationalists. (The others had extreme immigration and world-conspiracy views but did not specifically have links to white organizations.) One candidate, the neo-Confederate Loy Mauch, won a seat in the Arkansas House of Representatives, and another, James C. Russell, who has denounced interracial marriage, garnered 37 percent of the vote in his quest for the New York House of Representatives. Some candidates benefited from a new umbrella organization-the A3P, or American Third Position-which was launched in 2010 by a handful of wonkish-looking professors and corporate lawyers to, as they wrote in their mission statement, "represent the political interests of White Americans." One of their political hopefuls, Atlee Yarrow, who has filed paperwork to run for Florida governor in 2014, says the Southern Poverty Law Center has listed A3P as a hate group "but it has open membership that mirrors the NAACP. They can have identity politics, but if white people do, it's considered racist."


LINK



White liberals tell black lies about civil rights




Posted on CafeMom Mobile
SallyMJ
by Ruby Member on Feb. 15, 2013 at 9:36 PM

BUMP!

Carpy
by Platinum Member on Feb. 16, 2013 at 3:33 AM
5 moms liked this
KKK Byrd was a republican? When Bill Clinton was overheard saying "I don't want to talk to that ni*+er", did he become a republican? Is Hillary a Republican since she called someone a "fucking Jew"?
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
shannonnigans
by Silver Member on Feb. 16, 2013 at 4:15 AM
2 moms liked this
You might want to look up party realignment, but before you do that, please find us a single KKK member who supports the Democratic Party.


Quoting SallyMJ:

Why sweet-a-kins,

Thank you so much - I wear your racist epithet as a badge of pride! As do all conservatives unjustly labeled as such.

Did you even read the OP? Republicans have always been the party of individual rights, and pushed through all of the Civil Rights acts in the past 150 years.

The Democrat Party is filled with racists and race-baiters - not toward their own, but toward conservatives. The most viciously hit victims of liberal racism are conservatives of color, especially black conservatives. You can't deny that. And libs love to volley slander of racism at conservatives of any kind.

BTW, white supremacists are not conservatives.  Actually they are more similar to the KKK, a Democrat group.

Nice try.


Quoting sweet-a-kins:

 The most ignorant thing you have ever posted


So what happened, Why are MOST OF the racists in the republican party now?


 


 



So, how long until the Republican party is declared a “hate group”? vickie said, on May 31st, 2012 at 9:17 pm. ... The election of this white supremacist, ...

www.splcenter.org/.../longtime-white-​supremacist-to-serve...



More White Supremacists With Ties To Neo-Nazi Groups Elected into the Republican Party ... White Supremacist With Ties To Neo-Nazi Groups Elected To Pennsylvania County ...

tucsoncitizen.com/hispanic-politico/​2012/05/31/more...


White Supremacist Stampede


Jul 4, 2011 8:18 PM EDT



A startling number of white-power candidates are seeking public office. Eve Conant reports on their under-the-radar strategy and David Duke's White House flirtation.




  • Add to the growing list of candidates considering a bid for the GOP presidential nomination in 2012 America's most famous white-power advocate: David Duke.



A former grand wizard of the Ku Klux Klan, member of the Louisiana House of Representatives and Republican executive-committee chairman in his district until 2000, Duke has a significant following online. His videos go viral. This month, he's launching a tour of 25 states to explore how much support he can garner for a potential presidential bid. He hasn't considered running for serious office since the early '90s, when he won nearly 40 percent of the vote in his bid for Louisiana governor. But like many "white civil rights advocates," as he describes himself to The Daily Beast, 2012 is already shaping up to be a pivotal year.



Former (and current) Neo Nazis, Ku Klux Klan members, neo-Confederates, and other representatives of the many wings of the "white nationalist" movement are starting to file paperwork and print campaign literature for offices large and small, pointing to rising unemployment, four years with an African-American president, and rampant illegal immigration as part of a growing mound of evidence that white people need to take a stand.

Most aren't winning-not yet. But they're drawing levels of support that surprise and alarm groups that keep tabs on the white-power movement (members prefer the terms "racial realist" or "white nationalist"). In May, the National Socialist Movement's Jeff Hall hit national headlines in a bizarre tragedy: his murder, allegedly at the hands of his 10-year-old son. But before his death, he had campaigned for a low-level water board position in Riverside, California. The swastika-wearing plumber who patrolled the U.S. border paramilitary-style walked away with almost 30 percent of his community's vote. "That's a sizable amount of the vote for a person running openly as a Neo Nazi," says Marilyn Mayo, co-director of the Anti-Defamation League's Center on Extremism.  While Hall's political future-and life-has been cut short, Mayo points out that we should expect more white supremacist hopefuls next year.

Mayo and others date the current spike to 2008, and the election of the country's first African-American president (an historic marker accompanied by a surge in the percentage of U.S. children born to minorities in 2008-48 percent, compared to 37 percent in 1990). "The immediate reaction after Obama was elected was of rage. They feel if a black man can get elected to office, why can't someone who represents white interests?" Just a few weeks after Obama's election, Duke gathered followers in Memphis to expressly strategize what to do next. The solution? If you can't beat ‘em, join ‘em. 

Billy Roper, David Duke

Billy Roper, at the White Heritage Days Festival (left) on September 18, 2004. Former Ku Klux Klan leader and congressional candidate David Duke speaks on "Meet the Press." March 28, 1999 (right). (Photos from left: David S. Holloway / Getty Images; Richard Ellis / Getty Images)



What followed in 2010, say extremism watchers, was the biggest electoral push by white supremacists in years. "We've seen increasing numbers of white supremacists and others on the radical right running for electoral office for several years now and we likely had more in the last election than in any other in recent memory," says Mark Potok of the Southern Poverty Law Center. "Although extremely few of these people are elected, especially if their views become known during the campaign, the fact that there are so many openly running for public office reflects the growth of white nationalism over the last 10 years."



Potok's group tracked 23 candidates in 2010 with radical right-wing views, nine of whom they described as white supremacists or white nationalists. (The others had extreme immigration and world-conspiracy views but did not specifically have links to white organizations.) One candidate, the neo-Confederate Loy Mauch, won a seat in the Arkansas House of Representatives, and another, James C. Russell, who has denounced interracial marriage, garnered 37 percent of the vote in his quest for the New York House of Representatives. Some candidates benefited from a new umbrella organization-the A3P, or American Third Position-which was launched in 2010 by a handful of wonkish-looking professors and corporate lawyers to, as they wrote in their mission statement, "represent the political interests of White Americans." One of their political hopefuls, Atlee Yarrow, who has filed paperwork to run for Florida governor in 2014, says the Southern Poverty Law Center has listed A3P as a hate group "but it has open membership that mirrors the NAACP. They can have identity politics, but if white people do, it's considered racist."


LINK



White liberals tell black lies about civil rights





Posted on CafeMom Mobile
SallyMJ
by Ruby Member on Feb. 16, 2013 at 12:33 PM
3 moms liked this

You might want to check your history. The KKK is known as the terrorist arm of the Democratic Party, that terrorized and  lynched both black and white Republicans. Try to dispute that. You can't.

There is no such thing as "party realignment". Why would abolitionist Republicans turn into Democrat-esque racial bigots? Never happened. You are believing the lies of the Democrat Party trying to explain the black affiliation with Democrats, when they were always historically Republicans - the party that freed them from slavery and passed numerous civil rights laws, over the objections of Democrats. Republicans pushed the Civil Rights Act of 1964 over the top, not Democrats, whose percentage of support far dwarfed that of Republicans.

Blacks started leaving the GOP when racist LBJ passed his social programs that he said "will keep those ni****s voting Democrat for 200 years!" Proportionately more blacks were on these social programs  than whites, even though thought the number of whites was higher due to percentages of the population. You can't truthfully explain that in any other way. LBJ's social programs actually had racist aims. You know that, don't you?

From then on, cultural factors took over - as many people are members of the party their parents were.

Democrats like to explain this by saying they became color-blind and Republicans racist - only this is not true and is not backed up by the truth. Another Democrat fairy tale to try to explain their own evil, racist history.

Educate yourself - you will be surprised...and shocked.

Quoting shannonnigans:

You might want to look up party realignment, but before you do that, please find us a single KKK member who supports the Democratic Party.


Quoting SallyMJ:

Why sweet-a-kins,

Thank you so much - I wear your racist epithet as a badge of pride! As do all conservatives unjustly labeled as such.

Did you even read the OP? Republicans have always been the party of individual rights, and pushed through all of the Civil Rights acts in the past 150 years.

The Democrat Party is filled with racists and race-baiters - not toward their own, but toward conservatives. The most viciously hit victims of liberal racism are conservatives of color, especially black conservatives. You can't deny that. And libs love to volley slander of racism at conservatives of any kind.

BTW, white supremacists are not conservatives.  Actually they are more similar to the KKK, a Democrat group.

Nice try.


Quoting sweet-a-kins:

 The most ignorant thing you have ever posted


So what happened, Why are MOST OF the racists in the republican party now?


 


 



White liberals tell black lies about civil rights







Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

close Join now to connect to
other members!
Connect with Facebook or Sign Up Using Email

Already Joined? LOG IN