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How difficult ought it to be, to complete a 4 year university degree?

Posted by on Mar. 8, 2013 at 1:07 PM
  • 21 Replies

How difficult ought it to be, to complete a 4 year university degree, worthy of that name?

Should the difficulty of the course material be set at a level where you'd expect 90% of the population to be able to complete one in 4 years, given a high school education?

Or should it be harder than that?  Should it be so hard that only 70% of the population could attend university with a reasonable expectation of graduating?  Or 50%?  Or 30%?

How hard should degrees be?

by on Mar. 8, 2013 at 1:07 PM
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Replies (1-10):
mikiemom
by Gold Member on Mar. 8, 2013 at 1:37 PM

I think that depends on the degree one recieves.

Sisteract
by Socialist Hippie on Mar. 8, 2013 at 1:45 PM
1 mom liked this

I agree it depends on the degree.

Both of my kids could have been out in 3.5 years (one was, the other needed 1 class that was not offered in winter quarter).


It also depends on how flexible the school is (my girl talked her Profs into giving her dual credits for some course work), how many students attend, how impacted programs are and how often needed classes are offered. This last one really bothers me- Why is a class that many of the students need  to graduate only offered every other year?

In a perfect situation, students should be able to grad in 4 years.

Clairwil
by Platinum Member on Mar. 8, 2013 at 1:56 PM
Quoting mikiemom:

I think that depends on the degree one recieves.

Let's pick an example at random: the history of art.

What percentage of the population ought to be able to gain a 4 year honours degree in the history of art?

How hard should the course be, what standard of analysis, writing, encyclopaedic knowledge of the subject, etc should be required in order for someone to say "I have a degree in this"?

Or, to put it another way, if Podunk University offered a course in the history of art that anyone could pass just by recognising a stick figure of Charlie Brown in a single multiple choice test, should Podunk University's 'degree' receive accreditation from the various bodies in America who decide what is or is not a degree course for the purposes of state funding?    If not, then at what difficulty level should it be?

Clairwil
by Platinum Member on Mar. 8, 2013 at 1:59 PM

Perhaps a different question, but if you are an auction house, looking for a newly graduated art historian to join your evaluation team as a junior member, what proficiency level would you like "I have a degree" to indicate, and is that a level of proficiency that we should expect 90% of the population of America to be able to achieve in 4 years?

Momniscient
by on Mar. 8, 2013 at 2:02 PM

Degrees should be based on academic rigor not the lowest common denominator.

Accredidation is another matter :) Does a Harvard degree compare to the College of Southern Iowa? Should the standard be 'across the board?' That probably isn't going to happen.

mikiemom
by Gold Member on Mar. 8, 2013 at 2:05 PM

 colleges are accredited, it Podunk college is accredited to offer a 4 year degree in Art History the program would have to had met some form of Rigger determined by the College Accreditation board. I'm not really understanding your question. Or maybe I am. Are you asking about the Prestige of a degree. I will say having a degree doesn't actually mean you can do the job. It depends on the level of competency of the program.


Quoting Clairwil:

Quoting mikiemom:

I think that depends on the degree one recieves.

Let's pick an example at random: the history of art.

What percentage of the population ought to be able to gain a 4 year honours degree in the history of art?

How hard should the course be, what standard of analysis, writing, encyclopaedic knowledge of the subject, etc should be required in order for someone to say "I have a degree in this"?

Or, to put it another way, if Podunk University offered a course in the history of art that anyone could pass just by recognising a stick figure of Charlie Brown in a single multiple choice test, should Podunk University's 'degree' receive accreditation from the various bodies in America who decide what is or is not a degree course for the purposes of state funding?    If not, then at what difficulty level should it be?


 

mikiemom
by Gold Member on Mar. 8, 2013 at 2:07 PM

 I also don't get your hang-up with the four years - Each degree program should have qualifications, there should be a minimum set of criteria to meet within a certain time period. Achievement in 4 years would be for full time students but part time students might take longer to obtain the same requirements that should not be held against them.

Are you upset because you are competing for jobs with people that you feel have lesser qualifications than you do?


Quoting Clairwil:

Perhaps a different question, but if you are an auction house, looking for a newly graduated art historian to join your evaluation team as a junior member, what proficiency level would you like "I have a degree" to indicate, and is that a level of proficiency that we should expect 90% of the population of America to be able to achieve in 4 years?


 

JoshRachelsMAMA
by JRM on Mar. 8, 2013 at 2:08 PM
And the intelligence of the individual pursuing it.

Quoting mikiemom:

I think that depends on the degree one recieves.

Posted on the NEW CafeMom Mobile
Clairwil
by Platinum Member on Mar. 8, 2013 at 2:14 PM

For reference, the current situation is:


                        


Current situation:

People in the lowest 15%, by IQ score (400 or lower on SAT score), almost never graduate college.

People in the higest 15%, by IQ score (600 or higher on SAT score), are more likely to graduate college than not graduate.

JoshRachelsMAMA
by JRM on Mar. 8, 2013 at 2:15 PM
Ahh I get what you're saying.

Quoting Clairwil:


Quoting mikiemom:

I think that depends on the degree one recieves.

Let's pick an example at random: the history of art.

What percentage of the population ought to be able to gain a 4 year honours degree in the history of art?

How hard should the course be, what standard of analysis, writing, encyclopaedic knowledge of the subject, etc should be required in order for someone to say "I have a degree in this"?

Or, to put it another way, if Podunk University offered a course in the history of art that anyone could pass just by recognising a stick figure of Charlie Brown in a single multiple choice test, should Podunk University's 'degree' receive accreditation from the various bodies in America who decide what is or is not a degree course for the purposes of state funding?    If not, then at what difficulty level should it be?


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