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News & Politics News & Politics

THE SAD TRUTH ABOUT ILLEGAL IMMIGRATION AND THE SEQUESTER

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Out of President Obama's sequestration doomsday predictions, the one which best encapsulates what famed Washington Postreporter Bob Woodward described as "madness" involves illegal immigration. And it is no laughing matter.

A few hundred illegal immigrant detainees were released by the Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency, which probably led to the early "retirement" of ICE's Enforcement and Removal Operations Director Gary Mead. ICE plans to let loose between 5,000 and 10,000 additional illegal immigrants to meet the terms of the sequester. Confirming the story this week was The Washington Examiner.

But don't worry: Department of Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano has informed us that the illegals being released are "very low-level, low-risk detainees.” According to this New York Times profile, that can also be defined as illegals with convictions for “simple assault, simple battery, and child abuse." Are you comforted yet?

I have studied our porous Southern border closely. In 2006, I produced the award-winning documentary Border War: The Battle Over Illegal Immigration. Since that time, the situation and the drain on our social services and entitlement programs have become even more dire.

With President Obama rushing to give every illegal immigrant a pathway to citizenship, what he and our leaders in Congress should do is tell the truth about the state of the fence at our southern border and asking: Why hasn't the border fence been built? 

To get that answer, we must look back to the Secure Fence Act of 2006, which was signed into law by President George W. Bush. While it authorized the construction of hundreds of miles of "at least two layers of reinforced fencing," the law was subsequently amended heavily by then-Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison of Texas and others who gave DHS bureaucrats the ability to use less secure fencing at their discretion.

As Senator Jeff Sessions of Alabama pointed out during a February 13 Judiciary Committee hearing, with more than $600 million in appropriations, and out of the 700 miles of fence we were promised, only 36 miles of doubled-layered fence actually exist. The rest of the fencing consists of single-layer fence or just small "vehicle barriers" designed to stop cars, which any pedestrian could easily hop over. This is an outrage and one of the reasons Washington politicians are so unpopular.

Now, while the border fence construction has essentially stopped, Mexican cartels continue to smuggle weapons, drugs, and illegals into our country who are more likely to commit crimes and fill our prisons. The United State Attorney General's office has released statistical reports showing crime rates along the southern border is increasing, with drug smuggling posing a serious organized crime threat for the country. And throughout the border, desperate Southern states have erected signs warning citizens to avoid certain federal lands because of the high levels of human and drug trafficking.

Before Congress discusses comprehensive immigration reform, we must enforce the laws on our books, finish building a legitimate and effective fence for the 21st century, and further secure our border with boots on the ground. With enemies throughout the world who do not wear uniforms, our liberty can only be secure if we know exactly who is coming into the country. If we are a nation of laws, we cannot reward lawbreakers while punishing those who wait in line to find a better life. And if we are to cut the size of government while reducing the burden placed on law enforcement and social services, conservatives must unite and finally get our border secured first.

by on Mar. 10, 2013 at 1:31 AM
Replies (51-54):
jaxTheMomm
by Gold Member on Mar. 11, 2013 at 6:22 PM

I really don't know to whom you keep referring.  Bashir? 

Whatever...  I see a strong pattern with you.  I recognize it and sorry, but I giggle.

you are full of shit and not here for any type of discussion at all.   I know who you are and it's sad.

So have a nice evening with all that narcissism, but now I know so I will be more careful before I engage you.

i have no time for fools.

bird

Quoting SallyMJ:

Hilarious - Get your "bullying technique" tips from Bashir? 

Look up the word "condescending."

I would much rather be "bullied" or "insulted" in your sense of the word than than that of the actual definitions. I don't consider you weak at all.

It's called discussion with someone where you both have different ideologies.


Quoting jaxTheMomm:

Oy vey.  You are just going to jump to personal insults and ye olde "bullying technique".  I haven't insulted you, nor have I bullied you.

You were, indeed, condescending.  I was quite polite in my response.  For that, I get:


Quote:

You know this. Or should. Why ask? You and your buds would lambaste Bush if he ever did this.

I do not know how you were raised, but where I grew up, those are considered rude things to say. 

Nor did I say your posts were too long.  It would just be helpful if they were more concise.

I'm quite cordial, but I recognize the game you are playing. 

Act like a Polly Pill, oh so polite yet oh so backhanded, then jump back and squeal that you are being bullied.

I'm sorry, but I know how this game is played and I refuse to play.  It's beneath us both.  If you are unwilling to have a conversation or fair debate as an adult, then fine - now I know.  You are free to continue on posting eleventy seven bullshit propoganda pieces (why, I don't know, I can think of many more pleasant things to do) and I will, or will not, reply as I chose.

But at least I'll know you are full of crap and not up for an intelligent discussion.

Quoting SallyMJ:


Negative - these imprisoned illegal immigrant were in prison because they had been CONVICTED of these crimes - assault, battery, and child abuse, for the most part, as the article says. Already went through the court system.

Funny.

You insult me, so I call you on it.

Then you call me condescending for calling you on it - a bullying technique you share with Martin Bashir.

If you feel some of my posts are too long -  by all means, please feel free to skip them.

I think you are an intelligent person with interesting views. I would like to have discussions with you, if you can be cordial. But it is really difficult and unpleasant to be insulted all or most of the time.


Quoting jaxTheMomm:

It would help if you were a little more concise and a little less condescending.  I don't know who you think my "buds" are.  Whatever.

These immigrants are still in the court process to determine whether or not they are actually here illegally, or should be allowed to stay.  That hasn't stopped; their cases are ongoing.  I haven't read anything that states that any of these people were actually slated to be deported.

Where have you read that?

Quoting SallyMJ:

Come on Jax!! You know this. Or should. Why ask? You and your buds would lambaste Bush if he ever did this.

The law he is not enforcing in deporting illegal immigrants who are criminals - these guys were slated to be deported.


Quoting jaxTheMomm:

What law has the POTUS refused to enforce?


Quoting SallyMJ:

I don't remember any other President refusing to enforce laws.

Isn't that his job? Only if Congress changes the law, or the Supreme Court declares it unconstitutional is he not to enforce the law - even if he disagrees with it.

Another example of O thinking he is King of America.


Quoting 143myboys9496:

 Barry's attempting to outrage the public, by doing this. It IS an outrage.

The shameful thing is existing laws aren't being enforced. How hard is it to do that? I'm just sick and tired of these elected officials that are incompetent. Most of them couldn't find their dicks if the lights were turned off.

Is this an impeachable crime?

 

Are we moving forward yet??

Quoting SallyMJ:

Another example of the Obama administration staff choosing to make the sequester cuts as painful as possible - rather than using discretion in determining how to make the cuts without harming the American people.

This is a crime - releasing criminals!

Releasing illegals on to our streets with convictions for “simple assault, simple battery, and child abuse." Violent crime and child abuse! And these are the "low level" criminals. Would we release CITIZENS convicted of these crimes? NO. Why illegal immigrants? This makes absolutely no sense.

And 5,000 to 10,000 more are scheduled to be released. And our borders are not secure. 

Good job, Mr. President. You see, I have an eye problem.  I can't see your administration going back to work again.

 

















JustCJ
by on Mar. 11, 2013 at 6:27 PM

I'm not sure I follow? Sorry been gone all day.

Quoting Raintree:

They divested.

How do you feel about tax payer subsidization of for-profit prisons in light of what we've seen with the sequester?

Quoting JustCJ:

So where is the summary of the allegations for here in the US? They conducted an investigation but never said what they actually did or did not find?

Quoting Raintree:

6:00 A.M. EDT January 5, 2012

Angela Moyo protests outside the Nashville, Tenn., headquarters of Corrections Corporation of America on Nov. 14. UMNS photos by Kathleen Barry.
Angela Moyo protests outside the Nashville, Tenn., headquarters of Corrections Corporation of America on Nov. 14. UMNS photos by Kathleen Barry.
View in Photo Gallery

Private prison companies are big business. But, is it moral for United Methodists to make a profit from the incarceration of people?

The United Methodist Church’s pension agency has pondered that question since May. The Board of Pension and Health Benefits announced Jan. 3 its decision to prohibit investments in companies that derive more than 10 percent of their revenue from the management and operation of prison facilities. 

“It came down to that profiting from the incarceration of others was just not consistent with our view of what the (denomination’s) Social Principles ask for,” said David Zellner, the board’s chief investment officer.

The agency has the authority to make investment decisions.

The week after Christmas, the board sold about $1 million in stock in two companies that fell under the new screen — Corrections Corporation of America, more commonly called CCA, and the GEO Group.

 With almost $17 billion in assets, the United Methodist program is the largest church pension fund — and 80th largest pension fund — in the United States. Some 74,000 clergy and lay personnel participate in the denomination’s pension and benefits programs.

One of those participants is the Rev. V. H. “Sonnye” Dixon, lead pastor of Hobson United Methodist Church in Nashville, Tenn., who applauded the decision. He was an observer at a Nov. 14 demonstration at the CCA headquarters in Nashville.

“You want your investment in the pension fund to be placed with companies that are doing well, but you don’t want them putting money in companies that are doing well at the expense of the dignity of other people,” he said.

Incarceration is necessary at times, he acknowledged. However, Dixon sees private prison companies as more interested in pursuing a profit than promoting possible rehabilitation and re-entry.

“It’s just something that I don’t think we as The United Methodist Church should be participating in in any kind of way,” he said.

Nashville groups join Occupy Nashville participants and former CCA detainees to protest at the private-prison company’s headquarters.
Nashville groups join Occupy Nashville participants and former CCA detainees to protest at the private-prison company’s headquarters.
View in Photo Gallery

Requests to divest

The board’s decision comes after the United Methodist Interagency Task Force on Immigration first raised concerns about private, for-profit prisons, which governments around the globe increasingly use to detain unauthorized immigrants.

Allegations of widespread abuse and neglect have come with the expansion of private dentention. The Australian government, for example, dropped its contract with the GEO Group in 2003 after a commission found detained children were denied health care and subject to cruel treatment.

The pension agency later received requests to divest from prison companies from Metodistas Asociados Representando Ia Causa de los Hispanos Americanos, the denomination’s Hispanic caucus, and a petition signed by more than 1,170 United Methodists.

The United Methodist Board of Church and Society, the agency charged with advocating for the denomination’s Social Principles, created the petition. Bill Mefford, the agency’s director of civil and human rights, said he found troubling news reports about a violent private juvenile facility in Mississippi that houses teens with adults.

Phoenix Area Bishop Minerva G. Carcaño, co-chair of the denomination’s immigration task force, said the group first learned of the situation with private prisons through the ecumenical partners that work on immigration concerns.

“The board of pension was very good about doing all the research into not only what it means to invest in these for-profit detention centers but also setting that alongside how we invest … in line with our Christian faith,” she said. “This is a win for the connection.”

A young adult protests corporate profit from incarceration.
A young adult protests corporate profit from incarceration.
View in Photo Gallery

History of socially responsible investment

United Methodist groups, like many other religious organizations, long have participated in what the financial industry calls socially responsible investing.

The Book of Discipline, the denomination’s law book, requires that all church agencies and institutions, including hospitals and universities, “make a conscious effort” to invest in line with United Methodist Social Principles.

The book specifically urges church institutions to “endeavor to avoid” businesses that engage in racial discrimination, violate human rights or use forced labor. The book also exhorts United Methodist entities to avoid investments that support gambling, pornography, alcoholic beverages, tobacco or the production of nuclear armaments.

As a rule, the United Methodist pension board and other church-related groups will not invest in a company that receives more than 10 percent of its revenue from the objectionable products. With this announcement, the pension board is adding companies that manage or operate prison facilities to the screen-out list.

“These companies that are responsible for operating prisons were such a small portion of the investment universe that it would not violate our fiduciary responsibility to implement this sixth screen,” Zellner said.

The pension agency has amended its Statement of Administrative Investment Policy to say: “Investments will not knowingly be made in any company/corporation in which 10 percent or more of gross revenue is derived from the management or operation of federal, state, county, or municipal correctional facilities (jails, prisons, penitentiaries, detention centers, prison camps, transfer centers).”

Vidette Bullock Mixon, the pension board’s corporate relations director, said the board’s Principles and Fiduciary committees reviewed several social principles including the following two to inform their decision.

The first states that “the mistreatment or torture and other cruel, inhumane, and degrading treatment or punishment of persons by governments for any purpose violates Christian teaching and must be condemned and/or opposed by Christians and churches wherever and whenever it occurs.”  

The second calls for the creation of a justice system that provides “for the care and restoration of victims, offenders, criminal justice officials, and the community as a whole.”

“We simply do not want to profit from a business that does that.”
–Barbara Boigegrain

The board’s decision also came after a months-long investigation that included visits to a private prison near Indianapolis as well as a government- run correctional facility in Joliet, Ill. Pension staff members also met with CCA management and engaged in conversation with the GEO Group.

According to the Interfaith Center for Corporate Responsibility, a number of faith-based investors have engaged in shareholder advocacy with private prison companies to encourage humane treatment of detainees.

Barbara Boigegrain, the pension board’s top executive, said agency directors and staff did discuss whether further engagement with these companies would be productive. The board of directors ultimately decided it did not want to invest in the detention industry.

“We don’t believe we can ask companies that distill and sell alcohol, not to distill and sell alcohol. We simply do not want to profit from a business that does that,” she said. “(It’s) the same thing with prison companies.”

Daniel Carrillo, campaign coordinator for the National Prison Divestment Campaign, said he thinks the pension board is the first religious group to withdraw investments entirely from private-prison companies.

What other groups are doing

The pension agency is just one of many United Methodist groups — including universities, hospitals and foundations — that oversee investments.

Byrd L. Bonner, executive director of the United Methodist Church Foundation, said foundation directors plan to discuss whether to continue investing in private prison companies at their May meeting. The foundation manages endowments for church agencies and other general church initiatives.

General Conference, the denomination’s top lawmaking body, next meets April 24-May 4 in Tampa, Fla. The quadrennial gathering often takes up petitions for the denomination to withdraw investments from certain types of companies.

Bonner, who chairs the denomination’s Socially Responsible Investment Task Force, and other church leaders do not know of any petitions heading to this spring’s General Conference that specifically seek divestment from private-prison companies.

Boigegrain said she feels such action is unnecessary.

“We don’t expect or desire any action by General Conference with regards to this additional screen,” she said. “We think the language that is in the Book of Discipline still pertains.”

*Hahn is a multimedia news reporter for United Methodist News Service.




pvtjokerus
by Gold Member on Mar. 11, 2013 at 9:32 PM

 And again.....still can't stay on point......


Quoting Raintree:

What pvtaoweirndfgasdfasdf... can't see the big picture?

I love all of you small government (BIG GOVERNMENT!!) fans. You're so endlessly hilarious.

Quoting pvtjokerus:

 What Raintree....can't stay on point?  The illegals get tossed into our society by a bogus move made by Mr. Obama and you try to divert the attention back to Bush. 

 

Quoting Raintree:

Oh brother. Again.

You believe that many prisons aren't money-making enterprises? Google it.

In the last four years, we've sent home 50% more illegal immigrants than the first four years of the Bush admin. and 30% more than the second Bush admin.

Stick that in your pipe and smoke it. What's better? They aren't clogging up our for-profit prison system.

Quoting SallyMJ:

Private prisons? I've never heard of them.

I think you mean citizens are outraged that the administration released onto our streets convicted criminals that are supposed to be deported.

That is maddening. They don't belong here - and the administration before enforced the laws to put them in prison - did a pretty good job at it.  And then totally abdicated their legal responsibilities. They don't get that option. 

 

Quoting Raintree:

lol..

I see the private prison interest groups are up in arms about this loss of business.

lol.

 

 


 

 



 

SallyMJ
by Ruby Member on Mar. 11, 2013 at 10:18 PM

Please re-read my comment - and realize that I agree with you - other than your belief I need to pick up smoking. 

I SAID Obama's administration was doing really well at illegal immigrant deportations the past few years. This is primarily from changing the feds' focus on routine checks in prisons instead of occasional workplace raids. Previous administrations rounded up illegal immigrants from workplace raids. But you're going to get the bad guys in the PRISONS - much better idea to deport prisoners. So I definitely give him kudos for that.

The problem, as I said below, is that with these "sequester illegal immigrant prisoner releases' - Obama has STOPPED doing what he was doing that was so great. He's actually started to go backwards on his positive record. His administration started releasing illegal immigrant PRISONERS/CRIMINALS. This is Illegal - by law, you are supposed to deport illegal immigrants who are convicted felons, not release them into the community.

I don't think you mean "high profit." Profit refers to private business. Prisons are not private businesses , so that does not apply. They are public institutions run by the state or federal system. And yes - I totally agree with what I think you meant to say. In many states, the pay/benefits/pensions of prison employees are WAY out of the norm for the private sector, and essentially making prison guards and administration rich, at the people's expense. And the "five star" amenities in prison, often better than the private sector - are insane. I like the sheriff who puts prisoners in tents, feeds them baloney sandwiches and gives them pink undies and T-shirts. It should be  pain in the neck, not like a spa.

Please read comments before replying - so you don't misinterpret and belittle someone who actually agrees with you!

Quoting Raintree:

Oh brother. Again.

You believe that many prisons aren't money-making enterprises? Google it.

In the last four years, we've sent home 50% more illegal immigrants than the first four years of the Bush admin. and 30% more than the second Bush admin.

Stick that in your pipe and smoke it. What's better? They aren't clogging up our for-profit prison system.

Quoting SallyMJ:

Private prisons? I've never heard of them.

I think you mean citizens are outraged that the administration released onto our streets convicted criminals that are supposed to be deported.

That is maddening. They don't belong here - and the administration before enforced the laws to put them in prison - did a pretty good job at it.  And then totally abdicated their legal responsibilities. They don't get that option. 


Quoting Raintree:

lol..

I see the private prison interest groups are up in arms about this loss of business.

lol.






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