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What Do Actual Doctors Think About Obamacare Now?

Posted by on Mar. 22, 2013 at 11:53 AM
  • 61 Replies

Rod of Asclepius - Cadaceus



Scott W. Atlas, M.D., Forbes Contributor

 10/11/2012 @ 8:57AM



“What’s most telling is that some of the people who are most supportive of reform are the very medical professionals who know the health care system best.” Barack Obama, October 5, 2009.

We all remember the highly publicized Rose Garden ceremony of smiling doctors in their white coats standing alongside a glowing President Obama (“you look very spiffy in your coats,” he approvingly noted) in his attempt to validate his Affordability Care Act to the public before its details were even exposed to public scrutiny.

And we also recall when the AMA endorsed ObamaCare at its inception, an endorsement that led many Americans to believe America’s doctors supported the dramatic changes to the U.S. health care system.

The problem is that, unbeknownst to the public and the press, the AMA represents only about one fourth of the nation’s doctors.

Meanwhile, contrary to those doctors selected to legitimize ObamaCare in the staged media event (where the White House actually handed out white lab coats to generate the image of official credibility), an overwhelming 70 percent of doctors said, even back in 2011, that they disagreed with the AMA’s position on health reform, while only 13 percent agreed with it.  In fact, almost half of doctors in that survey even went so far as to say that the AMA stance on ObamaCare was the factor causing them to drop AMA membership.

What has happened to the opinion of doctors, now that ObamaCare has been examined in detail?

Moving the clock forward to this year, thousands of the nation’s doctors from all across the country engaged in the full spectrum of clinical practice have had the chance to digest the content of ObamaCare and to see the early impact of the law. Without the filtering by the president’s staff, and after far more exposure of the details in the ACA, the nation’s doctors have twice expressed their views about ObamaCare.

This past February, 60 percent of more than 5,000 doctors surveyed said the Obama health law would have a negative impact on patient care, while only 22 percent thought it would be positive. And more than half thought it would have a negative impact on their relationships with patients, while only 11 percent thought the doctor-patient relationship would be better. A startling 43 percent said the health care reform itself would likely lead them to retire over the next 5 years, and only 37 percent said that was an unlikely consequence of this law. It is worth repeating that sentiment to understand the impact of ObamaCare – it is viewed as being so destructive that almost half of doctors said they would “likely” soon retire directly because of the law itself.

Why do America’s doctors overwhelmingly disagree with the changes to U.S. health care by ObamaCare? 

Perhaps America’s doctors, those who actually have experience and knowledge about how American health care functions, realize how ObamaCare would dumb down its excellence, shackle doctors, and restrict access to care for patients, while transforming health care toward the centralized bureaucracies of Western Europe or Canada.

Perhaps America’s doctors see the repeated behind-the-scenes maneuvers by our political leaders in the US, frankly by some of the strongest advocates for more government control of US health care when they or their families are sick. Like when President Obama, an on-the-record supporter of single- payer systems (“I happen to be a proponent of a single payer universal health care program”on June 30, 2003), was asked pointedly in 2009 to promise that he would not seek out-of-plan help for his wife or daughters if they became sick and the public plan he was then proposing limited their options, the president refused, and instead replied, “If it’s my family member, if it’s my wife, if it’s my children, if it’s my grandmother, I always want them to get the very best care.” Time and time again, these same outspoken advocates of nationalized health systems for the rest of us, like the late Senator Edward Kennedy of Massachusetts, have exercised their personal freedoms unique to our system for the latest diagnostic tests, the most sophisticated surgical techniques, the most innovative medical therapies, the newest drugs, and the best doctors in the world – right here, in America, where those choices were uniquely available – when confronted with their own personal illnesses.

At the time, President Obama appeared thoughtful and logical back in 2009, when he assured our nation that America’s doctors, the experts in medical care, the doctors who supply the vast majority of innovation and the training for most of the world in health care advances, supported his radical transformation of American health care After all, he said they “would not be supporting health insurance reform if they really believed that it would lead to government bureaucrats making decisions that are best left to doctors.”  But in retrospect, maybe he should have actually listened, instead of passing out more white coats for the willing few.

Scott W. Atlas, MD is the David and Joan Traitel Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University, and author of the recently published book In Excellent Health: Setting the Record Straight on America’s Health Care (Hoover Press, 2011).

http://www.forbes.com/sites/scottatlas/2012/10/11/what-do-actual-doctors-think-about-obamacare-now/

by on Mar. 22, 2013 at 11:53 AM
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Replies (1-10):
Ziva65
by Bronze Member on Mar. 22, 2013 at 12:07 PM

Working in health-care as a provider, I think it's scary. It is rationing, in order to provide for all. Providers see more patients, they are rushed, and paid less. I don't blame providers at all for retiring, and I know many of them who are retiring as well- and encouraging their kids to go into another field.Granted, they didn't need to make 500-600 thousand a year, but this is a pendulum now that has swung to the other extreme.

As a patient, and having elderly parents, I have learned I need to be VERY aggressive and vocal to get what the need- it's not even what we want. When they have been inpatients in the last year, I was there every day, all the time if I can just to oversee the care. Sorry, but to me it is scary, especially for seniors. Yes, IMO there is rationing, and I see it from both sides. It's probably the only logical way to try to provide for all- unfortunately the cost is very high. 

Even for my children, I have had to be very aggressive to get what I want, whether it's acne meds or whatever. I have also been willing ot pay privately for meds easily obtained before- even an epipen is expensive. Insurance companies are going to the bare basics. It definitely impacts the decisions that physicians and NP;s are faced with in order to care for their patients.

In the end, when this all shakes out- it will be different than we knew it as before. Not ideal IMO- not bad necessarily, just different. We as consumers will need to be aware and advocates for ourselves and our families. A a provider, we will just do what we are trained within the parameters we have- the onus will be on patients to be informed and make decisions accordingly.

-Celestial-
by Platinum Member on Mar. 22, 2013 at 12:21 PM
2 moms liked this
I had a Dr at my desk yesterday saying the healthcare law isn't perfect but definitely has helped numerous patients thanks to preventive care. Cancer screenings has gone up and is saving lives as well as money.
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paknari
by Silver Member on Mar. 22, 2013 at 12:35 PM
The problem I have with this is that there is already rationing. Some people go without, some abuse the emergency system because it's the only option and them there are the people who have the money or the insurance. I have decent insurance and I can tell you that I received different care than my niece who doesn't. I am catered to more, given more meds if I want them and never get dismissed. I've watched her be ignored by nurses, denied medication, and left for hours without being checked on in the same facility. The medical personel know when they are getting payment and when they are not.
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SallyMJ
by Ruby Member on Mar. 22, 2013 at 12:54 PM
1 mom liked this

What I've heard, Ziva is that we currently have "hidden" rationing, because it comes from the plan talking with the provider. You can ask/speak up., appeal if necessary and eventually will get what you need.

Under Obamacare, it is overt. They say no - and as far as I know, you cannot appeal. Scary.

Hey - Is your real name Ziva? Ziva on NCIS is my favorite. Any connection to her, or Israeli or Middle Eastern name? Just curious.  :)


Quoting Ziva65:

Working in health-care as a provider, I think it's scary. It is rationing, in order to provide for all. Providers see more patients, they are rushed, and paid less. I don't blame providers at all for retiring, and I know many of them who are retiring as well- and encouraging their kids to go into another field.Granted, they didn't need to make 500-600 thousand a year, but this is a pendulum now that has swung to the other extreme.

As a patient, and having elderly parents, I have learned I need to be VERY aggressive and vocal to get what the need- it's not even what we want. When they have been inpatients in the last year, I was there every day, all the time if I can just to oversee the care. Sorry, but to me it is scary, especially for seniors. Yes, IMO there is rationing, and I see it from both sides. It's probably the only logical way to try to provide for all- unfortunately the cost is very high. 

Even for my children, I have had to be very aggressive to get what I want, whether it's acne meds or whatever. I have also been willing ot pay privately for meds easily obtained before- even an epipen is expensive. Insurance companies are going to the bare basics. It definitely impacts the decisions that physicians and NP;s are faced with in order to care for their patients.

In the end, when this all shakes out- it will be different than we knew it as before. Not ideal IMO- not bad necessarily, just different. We as consumers will need to be aware and advocates for ourselves and our families. A a provider, we will just do what we are trained within the parameters we have- the onus will be on patients to be informed and make decisions accordingly.



SallyMJ
by Ruby Member on Mar. 22, 2013 at 12:59 PM
1 mom liked this



Quoting -Celestial-:

I had a Dr at my desk yesterday saying the healthcare law isn't perfect but definitely has helped numerous patients thanks to preventive care. Cancer screenings has gone up and is saving lives as well as money.

But again, that is not Obamacare at all.

That's their health coverage now - and yes, I agree, esp with managed care, the preventative measures have gone way up! I first started seeing those maybe 10 years ago - and now they are pretty much all over.

When I make an appointment it's something like: "Sally, you are due for a mammogram/pap, etc. Would you like me to schedule an appointment for you right now?"

Obamacare starts 1/1/14.


SallyMJ
by Ruby Member on Mar. 22, 2013 at 1:03 PM
1 mom liked this

Which is even a HUGER problem with Obamacare.

They are not paid for a LOT of things, you have this IPAB rationing panel (aka death panel) that flat out denies lifesaving care for some people. That is not part of ANY healthplan right now.

How old is your niece - is she younger than age 26? If so, she can get on her parents' coverage now for no additional charge.

Or does she have Medicaid, CHIPP, or Healthy Families? Those are things she could get on now.

(I'm in healthcare too.) Maybe I can help.


Quoting paknari:

The problem I have with this is that there is already rationing. Some people go without, some abuse the emergency system because it's the only option and them there are the people who have the money or the insurance. I have decent insurance and I can tell you that I received different care than my niece who doesn't. I am catered to more, given more meds if I want them and never get dismissed. I've watched her be ignored by nurses, denied medication, and left for hours without being checked on in the same facility. The medical personel know when they are getting payment and when they are not.



ReadWriteLuv
by on Mar. 22, 2013 at 1:20 PM
Let me begin by stating that I am firmly an Independent, and I hate both parties equally. I have never been a stringent supporter of Obamacare, but I wasn't a strong opponent of it either. That is, until yesterday when certain aspects that I hadn't thought much about came to my attention.

I'm an X-ray tech who works in a private office owned by 8 orthopedic surgeons. The direct competitor is a group of orthopedic surgeons that are owned by a corporate medical company. Their surgeons are salaried and their employees are paid $3-$5 less per hour than we make here, with mandatory furlough days. It's miserable there, I know because I worked there for a short time. When the opportunity arose to run back to my current position, I couldn't get out of there fast enough. I had heard a rumor a month ago that one of our surgeons was seen touring their clinic, and the rumor over there was that the practices were joining. We all said no way, it will never happen. Then yesterday I discovered that the CEO of the competitors company visited our clinic last week. Someone close to the top of our good chain also said that she had heard rumors of combining, and the reasoning is that because reimbursement from Medicare and Medicaid specifically continues to plummet, the profit margin is shrinking at such a substantial rate that it is, and will, killing private practice clinics. Under Obamacare, private clinics will cease to exist and all of our healthcare will be corporate or hospital owned. The problem that I have with this is that if our office, who employs around 100 people, joins with their office who employs 100 people, who gets to keep their job? They won't need 200 employees. At least 75 people will be out of work, and that really sucks.

I despise corporate health care. I hate it. I hate that it's run like a business where money is the bottom line and patient care comes second, if not last. Nothing good can come of this. Nothing.
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paknari
by Silver Member on Mar. 22, 2013 at 1:23 PM
She's under 26 but she's married and he doesn't have insurance. Honestly where I would start if I was in charge would be to revamp the health insurance companies. I worked for united healthcare 10 years ago and we were always told that we would only pay 30% of the bill and the doctor made enough to write off the difference. They of course don't take into account how hard the physicians and staff work or how much the people are paying for the insurance as long as someone else has to foot the bill. I've also watched some of my employees literally killing themselves because they didn't have medical care. I had an employee at my previous job who didn't make enough to get health insurance and he was diabetic. His mother was also diabetic and had insirance do she was splitting her insulin with him do that both of them would stay alive. Barely. He went from full time to part time because he just couldn't do it anymore. It made me sick to watch. I've always been lucky to have wonderful healthcare staff and I know that there are many doctors out there who discount and care about there patients. I see the healthcare bill as an attempt to rectify a bad situation but I don't know how effective it will be. If it were up to me I would model my healthcare plan after Australia's two part system. They have both private and public insurance. You can have one or both. For someone who has no access to healthcare something is better than nothing!


Quoting SallyMJ:

Which is even a HUGER problem with Obamacare.

They are not paid for a LOT of things, you have this IPAB rationing panel (aka death panel) that flat out denies lifesaving care. That is not part of ANY healthplan right now.

How old is your niece - is she younger than age 26? If so, she can get on her parents' coverage now for no additional charge.

Or does she have Medicaid, CHIPP, or Healthy Families? Those are things she could get on now.

(I'm in healthcare too.) Maybe I can help.



Quoting paknari:

The problem I have with this is that there is already rationing. Some people go without, some abuse the emergency system because it's the only option and them there are the people who have the money or the insurance. I have decent insurance and I can tell you that I received different care than my niece who doesn't. I am catered to more, given more meds if I want them and never get dismissed. I've watched her be ignored by nurses, denied medication, and left for hours without being checked on in the same facility. The medical personel know when they are getting payment and when they are not.





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Friday
by Platinum Member on Mar. 22, 2013 at 1:29 PM
1 mom liked this


Quoting SallyMJ:

What I've heard, Ziva is that we currently have "hidden" rationing, because it comes from the plan talking with the provider. You can ask/speak up., appeal if necessary and eventually will get what you need.

Under Obamacare, it is overt. They say no - and as far as I know, you cannot appeal. Scary.

Hey - Is your real name Ziva? Ziva on NCIS is my favorite. Any connection to her, or Israeli or Middle Eastern name? Just curious.  :)


Quoting Ziva65:

Working in health-care as a provider, I think it's scary. It is rationing, in order to provide for all. Providers see more patients, they are rushed, and paid less. I don't blame providers at all for retiring, and I know many of them who are retiring as well- and encouraging their kids to go into another field.Granted, they didn't need to make 500-600 thousand a year, but this is a pendulum now that has swung to the other extreme.

As a patient, and having elderly parents, I have learned I need to be VERY aggressive and vocal to get what the need- it's not even what we want. When they have been inpatients in the last year, I was there every day, all the time if I can just to oversee the care. Sorry, but to me it is scary, especially for seniors. Yes, IMO there is rationing, and I see it from both sides. It's probably the only logical way to try to provide for all- unfortunately the cost is very high. 

Even for my children, I have had to be very aggressive to get what I want, whether it's acne meds or whatever. I have also been willing ot pay privately for meds easily obtained before- even an epipen is expensive. Insurance companies are going to the bare basics. It definitely impacts the decisions that physicians and NP;s are faced with in order to care for their patients.

In the end, when this all shakes out- it will be different than we knew it as before. Not ideal IMO- not bad necessarily, just different. We as consumers will need to be aware and advocates for ourselves and our families. A a provider, we will just do what we are trained within the parameters we have- the onus will be on patients to be informed and make decisions accordingly.



Yes, you can appeal ins company's decisions but you don't always win and I've seen some who finally won after they died.

I worked in member services for a large health ins company for a few years and everything I've read about the ACA that is supposed to be scary or bad, already happens with private ins every day.

 


Thank God......it's Friday!!!

Friday
by Platinum Member on Mar. 22, 2013 at 1:32 PM
1 mom liked this


Quoting SallyMJ:

Which is even a HUGER problem with Obamacare.

They are not paid for a LOT of things, you have this IPAB rationing panel (aka death panel) that flat out denies lifesaving care. That is not part of ANY healthplan right now.

How old is your niece - is she younger than age 26? If so, she can get on her parents' coverage now for no additional charge.

Or does she have Medicaid, CHIPP, or Healthy Families? Those are things she could get on now.

(I'm in healthcare too.) Maybe I can help.


Quoting paknari:

The problem I have with this is that there is already rationing. Some people go without, some abuse the emergency system because it's the only option and them there are the people who have the money or the insurance. I have decent insurance and I can tell you that I received different care than my niece who doesn't. I am catered to more, given more meds if I want them and never get dismissed. I've watched her be ignored by nurses, denied medication, and left for hours without being checked on in the same facility. The medical personel know when they are getting payment and when they are not.



Obviously you aren't familiar with private ins Utilization Management/Review Depts. They do exactly what your 'death panels' are supposed to do.

 


Thank God......it's Friday!!!

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