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US Airways ‘Forced’ Two Black [Non-Rev] Passengers To Change Jeans And Hoodies Before Boarding First Class

Posted by on Apr. 16, 2013 at 11:29 PM
  • 71 Replies

Posted: April 14, 2013


US Airways ‘Forced’ Two Black Passengers To Change Jeans And Hoodies Before Boarding First Class


US Airways have been accused of refusing to let two black passengers into first class unless they changed out of their jeans, hoodies and baseball caps into slacks and a button-up shirt.

McCraig Warren and Miles Warren are claiming that when they tried to board the plane in Denver bound for Los Angeles, they were told by an employee that their clothes violated a first class dress code.

The two men then went to a restroom to change their clothes. 

In a federal discrimination lawsuit filed Wednesday, the Warrens say they were then saw two young men in first class — one Caucasian and one Filipino — who were both wearing jeans and hooded sweatshirts.

The Warrens spoke to the two men who revealed that they were “not instructed to change their clothes prior to boarding, nor at any time during the flight.”

As a result of their alleged experience, the Warrens are now seeking punitive damages say they were shocked, humiliated and confused by what happened.

US Airways spokesperson Andrew Christie told AlterNet:

“We welcome customers of all ethnicities and backgrounds and do not tolerate discrimination of any kind. We take these allegations seriously.”

“Initial indications are that these pass-riders were traveling on non-revenue tickets as part of our employee travel program. All employees and pass-riders are expected to comply with the policies associated with this travel privilege.”

This explanation is understood to mean that passengers using “non-revenue” tickets are held to a dress code while other passengers are not.

by on Apr. 16, 2013 at 11:29 PM
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Replies (1-10):
SallyMJ
by Ruby Member on Apr. 16, 2013 at 11:36 PM
5 moms liked this

Every airline employee (and even their sister) knows that when using their employer provided non-revenue (ie, Non-Rev) tickets, they are required to wear business casual dress on the plane. 

Did their friend tell them? Did they ask? 

May be irrelevant now to that friend - who may have lost their job at US Airways.

If they had preferred to pay for their tickets, I'm sure their jeans and hoodies would have been just fine. Personally, I'd rather go with the dress code and save the money.

stacymomof2
by Bronze Member on Apr. 16, 2013 at 11:38 PM
2 moms liked this

Meh, that's dumb. If they were flying on employee passes they are expected to dress up.  My best friend's husband has been working for an airline for the past 15years, they know they have to follow the dress code.  I always dress up to fly, if you are dressed nice you can get upgraded to first class for free or a small fee.  It's happened to me twice.  :)

JanuaryBaby06
by on Apr. 16, 2013 at 11:40 PM

wow that is a huge overstep on US Airways part, I hope whoevers grand idea that was gets shown the door (not the poor person that had to deliver the news -if thats the case -but the higher power most likely passed down that dirty deed).

But if it was part of their tickets esp. if one of them was an employees then it is what it is..... rules are rules and generally there for a reason. I hope everything gets sorted out.

29again
by Gold Member on Apr. 16, 2013 at 11:40 PM

 

So, these two had comp flights, for whatever reason.  And since they got a free flight, they were expected to adhere to a dress code.  And they found that discriminatory.  Of course it was.  The airline expected passengers representing them in any capacity to be dressed well, which is apparently out of line these days.  I suppose that if they offered to pay for their flight, they could have kept the hoodies on, right?

I probably would have handled it differently, made sure these two knew what was expected before their flight, rather than assuming they knew how to dress for a flight and wait till they showed up.

DanaG70
by Member on Apr. 16, 2013 at 11:44 PM
4 moms liked this

 There is a dress code for anybody that is flying on the airline's dime. Anybody that works for the airline, is related to anybody that is employed by the airline and their grandmother knows it.

My mother in law worked for a airline for over 40 years, this is not new.

Analeigh2012
by Silver Member on Apr. 16, 2013 at 11:51 PM
4 moms liked this
Even if I fly on Sunday - if it is for business, I am representing my company and a dress code applies and is not discriminatory. I have flown on Non-Rev tickets and the dress code is declared in the rules and regulations. I get sick of people crying discrimination so quickly these days. The airline did nothing wrong.
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SallyMJ
by Ruby Member on Apr. 17, 2013 at 12:02 AM
1 mom liked this

I don't think you understand what you are saying.

This "grand idea", as you call it, of providing airline employees as one of their benefits, free airline tickets (aka, "Non-Rev" tickets) has been in place probably for about 60 years. And these tickets have always had a dress code.

And the problem you have with that great benefit that most of us would love - IS?


Quoting JanuaryBaby06:

wow that is a huge overstep on US Airways part, I hope whoevers grand idea that was gets shown the door (not the poor person that had to deliver the news -if thats the case -but the higher power most likely passed down that dirty deed). But if it was part of there passes esp. if one of them were emplyees then it is what it is..... rules are generally there for a reason. I hope everything gets sorted out. I hope if this is soem sort of rule that they have a lot of evidence to back them up.... they will need it.



Mommy_of_Riley
by Just Jess on Apr. 17, 2013 at 12:03 AM
When did first class become "dress code required"?
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
SallyMJ
by Ruby Member on Apr. 17, 2013 at 12:04 AM

Well, between them and their possibly-unemployed friend - they should have gotten it straight before they left.

Quoting 29again:

 

So, these two had comp flights, for whatever reason.  And since they got a free flight, they were expected to adhere to a dress code.  And they found that discriminatory.  Of course it was.  The airline expected passengers representing them in any capacity to be dressed well, which is apparently out of line these days.  I suppose that if they offered to pay for their flight, they could have kept the hoodies on, right?

I probably would have handled it differently, made sure these two knew what was expected before their flight, rather than assuming they knew how to dress for a flight and wait till they showed up.



JanuaryBaby06
by on Apr. 17, 2013 at 12:04 AM

 

Nothing. Did you read the end of my comment?

Quoting SallyMJ:

I don't think you understand what you are saying.

This "grand idea", as you call it, of providing airline employees as one of their benefits, free airline tickets (aka, "Non-Rev" tickets) has been in place probably for about 60 years. And these tickets have always had a dress code.

And the problem you have with that great benefit that most of us would love - IS?

 

Quoting JanuaryBaby06:

wow that is a huge overstep on US Airways part, I hope whoevers grand idea that was gets shown the door (not the poor person that had to deliver the news -if thats the case -but the higher power most likely passed down that dirty deed). But if it was part of there passes esp. if one of them were emplyees then it is what it is..... rules are generally there for a reason. I hope everything gets sorted out. I hope if this is soem sort of rule that they have a lot of evidence to back them up.... they will need it.

 

 

 

 

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