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GOP Didn't Want To Help Obama

Posted by on May. 8, 2013 at 11:13 PM
  • 17 Replies

Pat Toomey Background Checks
Sen. Pat Toomey (R-Pa.) blamed partisan politics for the failure of his bipartisan push to expand background checks for gun sales. (Photo by Jeff Fusco/Getty Images)

Sen. Pat Toomey (R-Pa.) revealed that some members of his party opposed expanding background checks for gun sales recently because they didn't want to "be seen helping the president."

Two weeks ago, only three Republican senators voted for the bipartisan background checks amendment sponsored by Toomey and Sen. Joe Manchin (D-W.Va.), despite overwhelming popular support for such a measure.

"In the end it didn’t pass because we're so politicized. There were some on my side who did not want to be seen helping the president do something he wanted to get done, just because the president wanted to do it,” Toomey admitted on Tuesday in an interview with Digital First Media editors in the offices of the Times Herald newspaper in Norristown, Pa.

The Times Herald noted that in "subsequent comments," Toomey "tried to walk that remark part-way back by noting he meant to say Republicans across the nation in general, not just those in the Senate."

Last week, Toomey placed more of the blame on the president himself, telling the Morning Call, "I would suggest the administration brought this on themselves. I think the president ran his re-election campaign in a divisive way. He divided Americans. He was using resentment of some Americans toward others to generate support for himself."

Manchin has argued, however, that the National Rifle Association's decision to score the vote was the main reason the compromise amendment on background checks failed. Without it, he believed, 70 senators -- well above the 60-vote threshold needed for passage -- would have supported it.

Opponents also pushed a significant amount of misinformation before the vote, including the myth that the legislation would lead to a federal gun registry. In fact, the bill would have made the creation of such a registry a felony carrying a prison sentence of up to 15 years.

Toomey was pessimistic on Tuesday about the prospects of gun legislation moving forward, saying it's "not likely to happen any time soon."

"The bill is available right now and Sen. (Majority leader Harry) Reid could bring it up for a vote at any time, but we need five people to change their minds," he said.

Sens. Kelly Ayotte (R-N.H.), Jeff Flake (R-Ariz.) and other lawmakers who voted against the background checks legislation have seen drops in their poll numbers since opposing the legislation.

Toomey, on the other hand, has seen his poll numbers rise.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/05/01/pat-toomey-background-checks_n_3192690.html

by on May. 8, 2013 at 11:13 PM
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grandmab125
by Gold Member on May. 9, 2013 at 12:58 AM
2 moms liked this

 The usual huffpost hack job of reporting.  They should use a vid of Toomey saying the above quote, if he did, instead of one where he's blaming the WH for air traffic controllers getting laid off.

What part of "there are something like 20 dem senators up for re-election, some of those being in red gun carrying states" don't you understand?  They're trying to protect their asses in 2014.  Even Harry Reid voted against it.

MsDenuninani
by Bronze Member on May. 9, 2013 at 12:26 PM
1 mom liked this

Yup.

There's some indication that there will be another vote, and people will change their vote.   The GOP wants to be seen as reasonable to women in the mid-terms, and this way they'll be able to say they did it on their own accord rather than at Obama's urging.

Which at this point is fine by me.  I just want it done.

itsmesteph11
by on May. 9, 2013 at 2:33 PM

 It was a stupid bill full of crap.  It shouldn't have passed anyway.   I think it's funny how they know they can't do anything that will prevent crazies from flipping out, obtaining a gun and blowing people away.  So instead of working on something that would help they go all out on whatever tiny nibble they can to make it look like they have done something. All while turning it into a partisan issue.   I think congress is full of sickos.

ramita
by Member on May. 9, 2013 at 4:06 PM
I have a question to those following the gun bills, wasn't there one that Republicans were putting out there right after this one failed? I could've sworn I read something about it, but I haven't seen anything about it since. I don't have tv or internet so the only 'news' I get is off my phone, so its hard to look stuff up.

Thanks!
susan115
by on May. 9, 2013 at 4:18 PM
1 mom liked this

 I think it was started with all the bullying that came out of the W.H. during the 1st term.  The attitude is I won and you didn't, the fish incident, the attempted blackout of Fox News, the not allowing Republicans to talk, the blaming of all the finicial crisis on the Repubs., the over the top parties, the lack of republicans allowed to attend top meetings compared to other presidents.  Plus, the W.H. has the media to help twist the truth and just bash any republican. Why help if all they do is call you a racist if you disagree with them?

blues_pagan
by on May. 9, 2013 at 5:02 PM

I think that some of these things need to be labeled as treason.  The simple fact of the matter is that they are playing politics on everything which includes things that will benefit the American citizens.  That in my book is treason.

nanaofsix531
by Platinum Member on May. 9, 2013 at 5:07 PM

It started the night of Obama's first inauguration by republicans.

Robert Draper Book: GOP's Anti-Obama Campaign Started Night Of Inauguration

Posted:  Updated: 04/26/2012 10:09 am

Do Not Ask What Good We Do

WASHINGTON -- As President Barack Obama was celebrating his inauguration at various balls, top Republican lawmakers and strategists were conjuring up ways to submarine his presidency at a private dinner in Washington.

The event -- which provides a telling revelation for how quickly the post-election climate soured -- serves as the prologue of Robert Draper's much-discussed and heavily-reported new book, "Do Not Ask What Good We Do: Inside the U.S. House of Representatives."

According to Draper, the guest list that night (which was just over 15 people in total) included Republican Reps. Eric Cantor (Va.), Kevin McCarthy (Calif.), Paul Ryan (Wis.), Pete Sessions (Texas), Jeb Hensarling (Texas), Pete Hoekstra (Mich.) and Dan Lungren (Calif.), along with Republican Sens. Jim DeMint (S.C.), Jon Kyl (Ariz.), Tom Coburn (Okla.), John Ensign (Nev.) and Bob Corker (Tenn.). The non-lawmakers present included Newt Gingrich, several years removed from his presidential campaign, and Frank Luntz, the long-time Republican wordsmith. Notably absent were Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) and House Minority Leader John Boehner (R-Ohio) -- who, Draper writes, had an acrimonious relationship with Luntz.

For several hours in the Caucus Room (a high-end D.C. establishment), the book says they plotted out ways to not just win back political power, but to also put the brakes on Obama's legislative platform.

"If you act like you're the minority, you're going to stay in the minority," Draper quotes McCarthy as saying. "We've gotta challenge them on every single bill and challenge them on every single campaign."

The conversation got only more specific from there, Draper reports. Kyl suggested going after incoming Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner for failing to pay Social Security and Medicare taxes while at the International Monetary Fund. Gingrich noted that House Ways and Means Chairman Charlie Rangel (D-N.Y.) had a similar tax problem. McCarthy chimed in to declare "there's a web" before arguing that Republicans could put pressure on any Democrat who accepted campaign money from Rangel to give it back.

The dinner lasted nearly four hours. They parted company almost giddily. The Republicans had agreed on a way forward:

Go after Geithner. (And indeed Kyl did, the next day: ‘Would you answer my question rather than dancing around it—please?’)

Show united and unyielding opposition to the president’s economic policies. (Eight days later, Minority Whip Cantor would hold the House Republicans to a unanimous No against Obama’s economic stimulus plan.)

Begin attacking vulnerable Democrats on the airwaves. (The first National Republican Congressional Committee attack ads would run in less than two months.)

Win the spear point of the House in 2010. Jab Obama relentlessly in 2011. Win the White House and the Senate in 2012.

"You will remember this day," Draper reports Newt Gingrich as saying on the way out. "You’ll remember this as the day the seeds of 2012 were sown."

Draper's timeline is correct. On Jan. 21, 2009, Kyl aggressively questioned Geithner during his confirmation hearings. On Jan. 28, 2009, House GOP leadership held the line against the stimulus package (Senate GOP leadership would prove less successful in stopping defections).

The votes, of course, can be attributed to legitimate philosophical objection to the idea of stimulus spending as well as sincere concern that the secretary of the Treasury should personally have a clean tax-paying record. But what Draper's book makes clear is that blunt electoral-minded ambitions were the animating force.

Whether or not that's shocking depends on the degree to which one's view of politics has been jaded. What's certainly noteworthy is the timing. When Mitch McConnell said in October 2010 that his party's primary goal in the next Congress was to make Obama a one-term president, it was treated as remarkably candid and deeply cynical. Had he said it publicly in January 2009, it would likely have caused an uproar.

By extension, however, the Draper anecdote also negatively reflects on the Obama administration for failing to appreciate how quickly congressional Republicans would oppose the president's agenda.

Quoting susan115:

 I think it was started with all the bullying that came out of the W.H. during the 1st term.  The attitude is I won and you didn't, the fish incident, the attempted blackout of Fox News, the not allowing Republicans to talk, the blaming of all the finicial crisis on the Repubs., the over the top parties, the lack of republicans allowed to attend top meetings compared to other presidents.  Plus, the W.H. has the media to help twist the truth and just bash any republican. Why help if all they do is call you a racist if you disagree with them?


susan115
by on May. 9, 2013 at 5:13 PM
1 mom liked this

 Please, this administration started it with "I won and you didn't".  Those were and still are the words of our current leader.  What happens when words like that are stated.  Read Tip O'Neal's book when he was speaker of the house.  He didn't like Reagan, Reagan didn't care for him, but what did they accomplish?  They worked on the economy, but the President took the first step and didn't go out and single out Dem.'s like this Admin. does.  Didn't this administration write a letter to the Gov. of Arizona complaining about a Rep senator stating something similiar to "if you don't control him, your state will lose money" and the fight started.


Quoting nanaofsix531:

It started the night of Obama's first inauguration by republicans.

Robert Draper Book: GOP's Anti-Obama Campaign Started Night Of Inauguration

Posted:  Updated: 04/26/2012 10:09 am

Do Not Ask What Good We Do

WASHINGTON -- As President Barack Obama was celebrating his inauguration at various balls, top Republican lawmakers and strategists were conjuring up ways to submarine his presidency at a private dinner in Washington.

The event -- which provides a telling revelation for how quickly the post-election climate soured -- serves as the prologue of Robert Draper's much-discussed and heavily-reported new book, "Do Not Ask What Good We Do: Inside the U.S. House of Representatives."

According to Draper, the guest list that night (which was just over 15 people in total) included Republican Reps. Eric Cantor (Va.), Kevin McCarthy (Calif.), Paul Ryan (Wis.), Pete Sessions (Texas), Jeb Hensarling (Texas), Pete Hoekstra (Mich.) and Dan Lungren (Calif.), along with Republican Sens. Jim DeMint (S.C.), Jon Kyl (Ariz.), Tom Coburn (Okla.), John Ensign (Nev.) and Bob Corker (Tenn.). The non-lawmakers present included Newt Gingrich, several years removed from his presidential campaign, and Frank Luntz, the long-time Republican wordsmith. Notably absent were Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) and House Minority Leader John Boehner (R-Ohio) -- who, Draper writes, had an acrimonious relationship with Luntz.

For several hours in the Caucus Room (a high-end D.C. establishment), the book says they plotted out ways to not just win back political power, but to also put the brakes on Obama's legislative platform.

"If you act like you're the minority, you're going to stay in the minority," Draper quotes McCarthy as saying. "We've gotta challenge them on every single bill and challenge them on every single campaign."

The conversation got only more specific from there, Draper reports. Kyl suggested going after incoming Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner for failing to pay Social Security and Medicare taxes while at the International Monetary Fund. Gingrich noted that House Ways and Means Chairman Charlie Rangel (D-N.Y.) had a similar tax problem. McCarthy chimed in to declare "there's a web" before arguing that Republicans could put pressure on any Democrat who accepted campaign money from Rangel to give it back.

The dinner lasted nearly four hours. They parted company almost giddily. The Republicans had agreed on a way forward:


Go after Geithner. (And indeed Kyl did, the next day: ‘Would you answer my question rather than dancing around it—please?’)

Show united and unyielding opposition to the president’s economic policies. (Eight days later, Minority Whip Cantor would hold the House Republicans to a unanimous No against Obama’s economic stimulus plan.)

Begin attacking vulnerable Democrats on the airwaves. (The first National Republican Congressional Committee attack ads would run in less than two months.)

Win the spear point of the House in 2010. Jab Obama relentlessly in 2011. Win the White House and the Senate in 2012.


"You will remember this day," Draper reports Newt Gingrich as saying on the way out. "You’ll remember this as the day the seeds of 2012 were sown."

Draper's timeline is correct. On Jan. 21, 2009, Kyl aggressively questioned Geithner during his confirmation hearings. On Jan. 28, 2009, House GOP leadership held the line against the stimulus package (Senate GOP leadership would prove less successful in stopping defections).

The votes, of course, can be attributed to legitimate philosophical objection to the idea of stimulus spending as well as sincere concern that the secretary of the Treasury should personally have a clean tax-paying record. But what Draper's book makes clear is that blunt electoral-minded ambitions were the animating force.

Whether or not that's shocking depends on the degree to which one's view of politics has been jaded. What's certainly noteworthy is the timing. When Mitch McConnell said in October 2010 that his party's primary goal in the next Congress was to make Obama a one-term president, it was treated as remarkably candid and deeply cynical. Had he said it publicly in January 2009, it would likely have caused an uproar.

By extension, however, the Draper anecdote also negatively reflects on the Obama administration for failing to appreciate how quickly congressional Republicans would oppose the president's agenda.

Quoting susan115:

 I think it was started with all the bullying that came out of the W.H. during the 1st term.  The attitude is I won and you didn't, the fish incident, the attempted blackout of Fox News, the not allowing Republicans to talk, the blaming of all the finicial crisis on the Repubs., the over the top parties, the lack of republicans allowed to attend top meetings compared to other presidents.  Plus, the W.H. has the media to help twist the truth and just bash any republican. Why help if all they do is call you a racist if you disagree with them?




susan115
by on May. 9, 2013 at 5:15 PM



Quoting susan115:

 Please, this administration started it with "I won and you didn't".  Those were and still are the words of our current leader.  What happens when words like that are stated.  Read Tip O'Neal's book when he was speaker of the house.  He didn't like Reagan, Reagan didn't care for him, but what did they accomplish?  They worked on the economy, but the President took the first step and didn't go out and single out Dem.'s like this Admin. does.  Didn't this administration write a letter to the Gov. of Arizona complaining about a Rep senator stating something similiar to "if you don't control him, your state will lose money" and the fight started.  By the way, Gueither was a bully, who was fired from a wall street brokage for unethical pratices and then ends up working for the feds.  Go figure.


Quoting nanaofsix531:

It started the night of Obama's first inauguration by republicans.

Robert Draper Book: GOP's Anti-Obama Campaign Started Night Of Inauguration

Posted:  Updated: 04/26/2012 10:09 am

Do Not Ask What Good We Do

WASHINGTON -- As President Barack Obama was celebrating his inauguration at various balls, top Republican lawmakers and strategists were conjuring up ways to submarine his presidency at a private dinner in Washington.

The event -- which provides a telling revelation for how quickly the post-election climate soured -- serves as the prologue of Robert Draper's much-discussed and heavily-reported new book, "Do Not Ask What Good We Do: Inside the U.S. House of Representatives."

According to Draper, the guest list that night (which was just over 15 people in total) included Republican Reps. Eric Cantor (Va.), Kevin McCarthy (Calif.), Paul Ryan (Wis.), Pete Sessions (Texas), Jeb Hensarling (Texas), Pete Hoekstra (Mich.) and Dan Lungren (Calif.), along with Republican Sens. Jim DeMint (S.C.), Jon Kyl (Ariz.), Tom Coburn (Okla.), John Ensign (Nev.) and Bob Corker (Tenn.). The non-lawmakers present included Newt Gingrich, several years removed from his presidential campaign, and Frank Luntz, the long-time Republican wordsmith. Notably absent were Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) and House Minority Leader John Boehner (R-Ohio) -- who, Draper writes, had an acrimonious relationship with Luntz.

For several hours in the Caucus Room (a high-end D.C. establishment), the book says they plotted out ways to not just win back political power, but to also put the brakes on Obama's legislative platform.

"If you act like you're the minority, you're going to stay in the minority," Draper quotes McCarthy as saying. "We've gotta challenge them on every single bill and challenge them on every single campaign."

The conversation got only more specific from there, Draper reports. Kyl suggested going after incoming Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner for failing to pay Social Security and Medicare taxes while at the International Monetary Fund. Gingrich noted that House Ways and Means Chairman Charlie Rangel (D-N.Y.) had a similar tax problem. McCarthy chimed in to declare "there's a web" before arguing that Republicans could put pressure on any Democrat who accepted campaign money from Rangel to give it back.

The dinner lasted nearly four hours. They parted company almost giddily. The Republicans had agreed on a way forward:


Go after Geithner. (And indeed Kyl did, the next day: ‘Would you answer my question rather than dancing around it—please?’)

Show united and unyielding opposition to the president’s economic policies. (Eight days later, Minority Whip Cantor would hold the House Republicans to a unanimous No against Obama’s economic stimulus plan.)

Begin attacking vulnerable Democrats on the airwaves. (The first National Republican Congressional Committee attack ads would run in less than two months.)

Win the spear point of the House in 2010. Jab Obama relentlessly in 2011. Win the White House and the Senate in 2012.


"You will remember this day," Draper reports Newt Gingrich as saying on the way out. "You’ll remember this as the day the seeds of 2012 were sown."

Draper's timeline is correct. On Jan. 21, 2009, Kyl aggressively questioned Geithner during his confirmation hearings. On Jan. 28, 2009, House GOP leadership held the line against the stimulus package (Senate GOP leadership would prove less successful in stopping defections).

The votes, of course, can be attributed to legitimate philosophical objection to the idea of stimulus spending as well as sincere concern that the secretary of the Treasury should personally have a clean tax-paying record. But what Draper's book makes clear is that blunt electoral-minded ambitions were the animating force.

Whether or not that's shocking depends on the degree to which one's view of politics has been jaded. What's certainly noteworthy is the timing. When Mitch McConnell said in October 2010 that his party's primary goal in the next Congress was to make Obama a one-term president, it was treated as remarkably candid and deeply cynical. Had he said it publicly in January 2009, it would likely have caused an uproar.

By extension, however, the Draper anecdote also negatively reflects on the Obama administration for failing to appreciate how quickly congressional Republicans would oppose the president's agenda.

Quoting susan115:

 I think it was started with all the bullying that came out of the W.H. during the 1st term.  The attitude is I won and you didn't, the fish incident, the attempted blackout of Fox News, the not allowing Republicans to talk, the blaming of all the finicial crisis on the Repubs., the over the top parties, the lack of republicans allowed to attend top meetings compared to other presidents.  Plus, the W.H. has the media to help twist the truth and just bash any republican. Why help if all they do is call you a racist if you disagree with them?






nanaofsix531
by Platinum Member on May. 9, 2013 at 6:53 PM

So the President said that before the inauguration,before the inauguration night meeting?When did he say it?

Quoting susan115:

 Please, this administration started it with "I won and you didn't".  Those were and still are the words of our current leader.  What happens when words like that are stated.  Read Tip O'Neal's book when he was speaker of the house.  He didn't like Reagan, Reagan didn't care for him, but what did they accomplish?  They worked on the economy, but the President took the first step and didn't go out and single out Dem.'s like this Admin. does.  Didn't this administration write a letter to the Gov. of Arizona complaining about a Rep senator stating something similiar to "if you don't control him, your state will lose money" and the fight started.


Quoting nanaofsix531:

It started the night of Obama's first inauguration by republicans.

Robert Draper Book: GOP's Anti-Obama Campaign Started Night Of Inauguration

Posted:  Updated: 04/26/2012 10:09 am

Do Not Ask What Good We Do

WASHINGTON -- As President Barack Obama was celebrating his inauguration at various balls, top Republican lawmakers and strategists were conjuring up ways to submarine his presidency at a private dinner in Washington.

The event -- which provides a telling revelation for how quickly the post-election climate soured -- serves as the prologue of Robert Draper's much-discussed and heavily-reported new book, "Do Not Ask What Good We Do: Inside the U.S. House of Representatives."

According to Draper, the guest list that night (which was just over 15 people in total) included Republican Reps. Eric Cantor (Va.), Kevin McCarthy (Calif.), Paul Ryan (Wis.), Pete Sessions (Texas), Jeb Hensarling (Texas), Pete Hoekstra (Mich.) and Dan Lungren (Calif.), along with Republican Sens. Jim DeMint (S.C.), Jon Kyl (Ariz.), Tom Coburn (Okla.), John Ensign (Nev.) and Bob Corker (Tenn.). The non-lawmakers present included Newt Gingrich, several years removed from his presidential campaign, and Frank Luntz, the long-time Republican wordsmith. Notably absent were Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) and House Minority Leader John Boehner (R-Ohio) -- who, Draper writes, had an acrimonious relationship with Luntz.

For several hours in the Caucus Room (a high-end D.C. establishment), the book says they plotted out ways to not just win back political power, but to also put the brakes on Obama's legislative platform.

"If you act like you're the minority, you're going to stay in the minority," Draper quotes McCarthy as saying. "We've gotta challenge them on every single bill and challenge them on every single campaign."

The conversation got only more specific from there, Draper reports. Kyl suggested going after incoming Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner for failing to pay Social Security and Medicare taxes while at the International Monetary Fund. Gingrich noted that House Ways and Means Chairman Charlie Rangel (D-N.Y.) had a similar tax problem. McCarthy chimed in to declare "there's a web" before arguing that Republicans could put pressure on any Democrat who accepted campaign money from Rangel to give it back.

The dinner lasted nearly four hours. They parted company almost giddily. The Republicans had agreed on a way forward:


Go after Geithner. (And indeed Kyl did, the next day: ‘Would you answer my question rather than dancing around it—please?’)

Show united and unyielding opposition to the president’s economic policies. (Eight days later, Minority Whip Cantor would hold the House Republicans to a unanimous No against Obama’s economic stimulus plan.)

Begin attacking vulnerable Democrats on the airwaves. (The first National Republican Congressional Committee attack ads would run in less than two months.)

Win the spear point of the House in 2010. Jab Obama relentlessly in 2011. Win the White House and the Senate in 2012.


"You will remember this day," Draper reports Newt Gingrich as saying on the way out. "You’ll remember this as the day the seeds of 2012 were sown."

Draper's timeline is correct. On Jan. 21, 2009, Kyl aggressively questioned Geithner during his confirmation hearings. On Jan. 28, 2009, House GOP leadership held the line against the stimulus package (Senate GOP leadership would prove less successful in stopping defections).

The votes, of course, can be attributed to legitimate philosophical objection to the idea of stimulus spending as well as sincere concern that the secretary of the Treasury should personally have a clean tax-paying record. But what Draper's book makes clear is that blunt electoral-minded ambitions were the animating force.

Whether or not that's shocking depends on the degree to which one's view of politics has been jaded. What's certainly noteworthy is the timing. When Mitch McConnell said in October 2010 that his party's primary goal in the next Congress was to make Obama a one-term president, it was treated as remarkably candid and deeply cynical. Had he said it publicly in January 2009, it would likely have caused an uproar.

By extension, however, the Draper anecdote also negatively reflects on the Obama administration for failing to appreciate how quickly congressional Republicans would oppose the president's agenda.

Quoting susan115:

 I think it was started with all the bullying that came out of the W.H. during the 1st term.  The attitude is I won and you didn't, the fish incident, the attempted blackout of Fox News, the not allowing Republicans to talk, the blaming of all the finicial crisis on the Repubs., the over the top parties, the lack of republicans allowed to attend top meetings compared to other presidents.  Plus, the W.H. has the media to help twist the truth and just bash any republican. Why help if all they do is call you a racist if you disagree with them?





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