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News & Politics News & Politics

I love Rick Perry! Leave Your States Business is Better in Texas!

Posted by on Jun. 16, 2013 at 6:33 PM
  • 32 Replies
1 mom liked this

Governor Rick Perry (R) is putting that ol’ “everything’s better in Texas” motto to the test. He appears in a new TV ad campaign, shown above, in hopes of enticing New York businesses to ditch the Empire State. The governor wants not only New Yorkers, but others across the country to know that his state is open for business.


What Are the Most, Least Free States in the United States?


Gov. Perry sat down with Shannon Bream on America’s New HQ on Sunday to explain. He said it’s a good experiment for the United States to take a look at how businesses in Texas are affected by low tax burdens, a legal system that doesn’t allow over-suing and accountable public schools.

He boasted, “Texas has the best business climate in the world. […] Over the last 10 years, 30 percent of all the new jobs created in America were in Texas.”

As for his critics in other states, Gov. Perry believes it's all part of healthy competition. “It’s the 50 laboratories of innovation that are out competing for the jobs to keep America at the front of the race.”

On another note, the governor just passed what's been nicknamed the "Merry Christmas law.” Gov. Perry explained that it protects people’s religious freedom to say things like “Merry Christmas” and “Happy Hanukah” in public without fear of retribution. “Why we had to do that is really kind of reflective of where the political correctness has gone in the country.”

He answered Fox News viewers’ questions which included will he run for president and what’s going to happen now that FEMA has denied funds to victims of the West, Texas explosion. The hear what Gov. Perry had to say, watch the clip above. 



Read more: http://foxnewsinsider.com/2013/06/16/gov-rick-perry-pushes-businesses-move-texas#ixzz2WQAYZJOy

by on Jun. 16, 2013 at 6:33 PM
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Replies (1-10):
autodidact
by Silver Member on Jun. 16, 2013 at 6:40 PM
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yeah, we saw how well their relaxed attitude toward regulation worked out for West. 

blues_pagan
by on Jun. 16, 2013 at 7:18 PM
1 mom liked this
Nope I will take my clean and environmentally friendly state of Vermont any time of the day over Texas.
lylalane7275
by Silver Member on Jun. 16, 2013 at 7:20 PM
2 moms liked this

I love Rick Perry too.

SallyMJ
by Ruby Member on Jun. 16, 2013 at 9:55 PM
3 moms liked this

OMB - 30% of the jobs were created in TX?Wow.

I LOVE the Merry Christmas law. Sad that it comes to this.

BTW - I also like Rick Perry's brother Steve  ("The Voice" from Journey)

gludwig2000
by Gina on Jun. 16, 2013 at 10:32 PM

I visited Texas years ago, and it was okay, but I like SC, for the most part. I have to agree that it is a shame that anyone would have to come up with a law protecting someone's right to wish another a happy holiday.

-Celestial-
by Pepperlynn on Jun. 16, 2013 at 11:13 PM
1 mom liked this
As a Texan. Rick Perry is an arrogant ass who does not have Texans best imterest at heart.

He's a failure as a governor and a presidential candidate, and once Texans get a clue, and they are, his ass will be gone.
Jshuma
by Member on Jun. 16, 2013 at 11:33 PM
4 moms liked this


As a Texan myself I don't think he is the second coming by any means, but he has done a great job in the state of Texas. If you doubt that, just look at some of the other states in the union who are losing jobs every day! The economy in Texas is growing, the schools are better than most n the nation. I don't know if he is arrogant I have never met the man myself. I moved here from NC, where the job I had shut the doors and over three thousand were without a job, and their governor this last election cycle tried to suspend the election she claimed because there was not enough money to have an election, because she had done such a poor job she knew she would not be reelected, which she was not.. I disagree with you. he does have Texans best interests at heart. If he were a failure then there would not be so many people moving here.

Quoting -Celestial-:

As a Texan. Rick Perry is an arrogant ass who does not have Texans best imterest at heart.

He's a failure as a governor and a presidential candidate, and once Texans get a clue, and they are, his ass will be gone.



grandmab125
by Platinum Member on Jun. 17, 2013 at 12:25 AM

 Get your head out of your butt.  They have not made a final determination as to what caused the explosion.  They are leaning heavily on the arson theory.  From The Atlantic Wire (note that they arrested a paramedic who had bomb making mateiral in his home):

 

This Is Exactly How Massive the Texas Fertilizer Explosion Was

 

AP
Philip Bump 4,972 Views May 16, 2013

Representatives of the ATF and the Texas Fire Marshall provided an update on their joint investigation into the fertilizer plant explosion in West Texas. The short story is that the cause of the fire is undetermined. The long story is that the investigation has been as massive as was the explosion.

 

At 7:29 pm on April 17, something caught fire in the seed and fertilizer building at the plant. Three minutes later, the fire department was dispatched; by 7:38 firefighters were on-scene. Three minutes later, more firefighters were called out.

 

At 7:51, the fire was hot enough to change the sensitivity of the ammonium nitrate stored in the building in a tall column of wooden bins. Something hit the unstable compound - a piece of equipment, or some debris - and triggered a small explosion. That explosion created enough additional heat and enough shock to set off a far larger blast a few milliseconds later. Investigators know there were two explosions because they were separately recorded on a seismograph at a nearby college. An estimated 28 to 34 tons of ammonium nitrate exploded, with the force of 15,000 to 20,000 pounds of TNT. An additional 20 to 30 tons in the building didn't go off, nor did 100 tons in a nearby railcar.

 

The blast killed twelve of the first responders at the scene, and three others elsewhere. It left a crater 93 feet wide and ten feet deep. Debris was scattered over a 37-block area, and pieces were found 2.5 miles away. Over 104 people from the two agencies spent 30 days going over the scene of the blast, excavating and mapping the crater, generating nearly 300 leads, interviewing 500 people. They combed an area covering about 14 acres. At one point, investigators looking for evidence sifted through an entire silo of corn - 300,000 pounds - by hand.

 

 

Despite that effort, what caused the fire isn't clear. Investigators have rules out a number of causes. It wasn't due to an earlier fire rekindling, as had been speculated. It wasn't spontaneous ignition from equipment in the plant or its 480-volt electrical system. It wasn't weather or smoking.

 

There are three possibilities. The first is that a second electrical system in the plant, its 120-volt system, malfunctioned. The second is that a battery failed on a golf cart kept in the room where the fire started. There have been cases in which such failures have started fires, and investigators have only found two small pieces of the cart, impairing their ability to evaluate it.

 

And then, of course, there's arson. The investigators pointed out that their investigation led them to Bryce Reed, an EMS worker arrested for possession of bomb-making materials. "At this time," a representative of the ATF told reporters, "authorities will not speculate whether that possession has any connection" to the explosion at the fertilizer plant. Beyond that, there was no indication of who might have intentionally set the fire.

 

The investigation in West, at the scene, is over. Now the investigation, which remains open, turns largely to analyzing the evidence they already have.

 

 

Quoting autodidact:

yeah, we saw how well their relaxed attitude toward regulation worked out for West. 

 

 

 

grandma B

grandmab125
by Platinum Member on Jun. 17, 2013 at 12:32 AM

 Has there been anything in the Texas papers about if they have made a final determination on the West, TX fertilizer plant explosion?  Everything I've been able to find on google, just talks about the investigation,and that they were supposed to release the findings at the end of May.

Quoting Jshuma:

 

As a Texan myself I don't think he is the second coming by any means, but he has done a great job in the state of Texas. If you doubt that, just look at some of the other states in the union who are losing jobs every day! The economy in Texas is growing, the schools are better than most n the nation. I don't know if he is arrogant I have never met the man myself. I moved here from NC, where the job I had shut the doors and over three thousand were without a job, and their governor this last election cycle tried to suspend the election she claimed because there was not enough money to have an election, because she had done such a poor job she knew she would not be reelected, which she was not.. I disagree with you. he does have Texans best interests at heart. If he were a failure then there would not be so many people moving here.

Quoting -Celestial-:

As a Texan. Rick Perry is an arrogant ass who does not have Texans best imterest at heart.

He's a failure as a governor and a presidential candidate, and once Texans get a clue, and they are, his ass will be gone.

 

 

 

grandma B

grandmab125
by Platinum Member on Jun. 17, 2013 at 12:46 AM
1 mom liked this

 Why don't you make those sour grapes into some 'wine', and stop with the 'whining'.

The Bureau of Labor Statistics just reported on 5/17/13 that Texas is at the top of the jobs number.  It added 33,100 jobs in just one month, from April to May (non agricultural jobs).

From Forbes.com:

Personal Finance

  

Quoting -Celestial-:

As a Texan. Rick Perry is an arrogant ass who does not have Texans best imterest at heart.

He's a failure as a governor and a presidential candidate, and once Texans get a clue, and they are, his ass will be gone.

 

|
2/25/2013 @ 11:27AM |106,675 views

Texas Dominates The Best Cities For Good Jobs

 

Gary Donaldson Very strange how all of the prosperous states are Republican and all of the bankrupt states are Democrat. Daniel Fisher, Forbes StaffSome of it is legacy costs. States that industrialized early also built large, unionized government infrastructure that is hard to jettison after the indus [...] Gary Donaldson Most of it is bad or terrible goverment management. When states tax businesses too much they move, When states have law that help only union workers and de [...] Clinton Sandvick It should be noted that Dallas, Houston and Austin (especially Austin) are heavily democratic cities. Additionally, don't confuse job growth with prosperit [...] ssohara This is a good point. I do believe business friendly "red-state" policies factor into the equation, but they are not the whole story. Legacy costs also pla [...] Daniel Fisher, Forbes StaffFBI crime statistics show California has a violent crime rate of 411 per 100,000, versus 408 for Texas. Illinois is 429. California's household poverty rat [...] Robert Thomas Check out quality of life also! Texas has one of the lowest in the nation. New residents that travel outside the city limits of Austin are in for a rude sh [...]
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Daniel Fisher, Forbes Staff

Some of it is legacy costs. States that industrialized early also built large, unionized government infrastructure that is hard to jettison after the indus [...]

 

Best Cities For Good Jobs

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Dallas

The Big D shrugged off the bankruptcy of American Airlines to add thousands of jobs last year and is expected to keep up the pace with growth in financial services, energy and healthcare.

5-year expected annual job growth rate: 2.8%
Per capita income: $39,548
Unemployment rate: 5.9%

Earlier this month, Texas Gov. Rick Perry made a quick tour of California to remind business owners that life's a whole lot easier in the Lone Star State. Perry's California critics called him "Governor Oops" for his miscues during the presidential debates, and Gov. Jerry Brown dismissed the Texan's recruiting drive as "not a burp," and barely even a certain bodily release of gas.

Laugh away, Californians. But Perry is playing the stronger hand here. Texas trounced the rest of the country our latest survey of the Best Cities for Good Jobs, with five metropolitan areas in the Top Ten, including the four best cities to find jobs in the next few years.

(See Also: How We Picked The Best Cities For Jobs)

This year's winner is Dallas, which shrugged off the Nov. 2011 bankruptcy of American Airlines parent AMR Corp. to rack up 2.1% job growth last year and is projected to continue adding jobs at a 2.8% rate through 2019 - more than 300,000 on top of the 2.1 million already in Dallas and its Plano and Irving suburbs.

"The explanation is we have an incredibly diversified economy," said Bernard Weinstein, who's been tracking the north Texas economy since 1975 and is associate director of Southern Methodist University‘s McGuire Energy Institute. "As the national economy improves, we're getting better."

To construct this list, Forbes gathered data from Moody's Analytics on the 100 largest U.S. metropolitan areas. We then ranked the cities according to recent and expected job growth, current unemployment rate, and current and expected per-capita income. We threw out cities with high unemployment rates or that are clearly rebounding from severe economic distress, such as Stockton, Calif., which came in first on 2012 job growth at 3.7% but still sports a 14% unemployment rate. We also gave increased weight to areas with high and growing per-capita incomes, to avoid steering people to cities that are adding lots of low-wage jobs. A description of the methodology is here.

The Moody's data show that Texans didn't suffer as much in the financial crisis, and they're doing much better now. The Texas unemployment rate rose from below 5% in 2007 all the way to a little above 8% in 2010, but now it's falling back down again to a current 6.2%. The U.S. unemployment rate peaked at 10% and is still stuck at about 8%, with states like California, Illinois and New York well above that.

"You've got these two economic powerhouses, Texas and California, and you have to ask why we are outperforming," Weinstein said. "It's a real testament to the diversity and strength of our economy, that through good times and bad we are outperforming the nation."

(See Also: How We Picked The Best Cities For Jobs)

One explanation that is definitely false: Texas isn't growing on the backs of underpaid, non-union workers. While Texas is a right-to-work state, many of the highest paying jobs in the Dallas area are with unionized defense manufacturers like Bell Helicopter and Lockheed Martin, which produces the F-35 Lightning II fighter at a mile-long plant in Fort Worth.

Asked about the state's reputation for union-busting and low-wage jobs, Dallas Federal Reserve Economist Pia Orrenius said "we get a lot of that."

"People say it's all low-pay jobs, so I looked at employment growth by wage quartile," she said. And guess what? Not only is the Dallas-area per-capita income of $39,548 comfortably above the national average of $37,000, but it's growing fastest in the top half of wages above $16 an hour.

Dallas doesn't have the booming energy industry of Houston - No. 2 on the list with expected 5-year job growth of 2.6% a year - but it has a prosperous and growing financial and professional-services sector. Bank of America has large back-office operations in the Dallas area and the city is home to large law and accounting firms as well as professionals who serve the energy industry. "Those are your extremely high paying jobs," Orrenius said, paying an average of $28 an hour.

The relatively higher wages in Dallas are what pushed it to the top of the list, but for raw growth the Austin area wins at No. 2 in the nation with an expected 5-year annual growth rate of 3.9%. (No. 1 was Honolulu, which but for recent hiccups in its job market and lackluster projected income growth would be in the Top 10 overall). Austin is sucking in high-tech jobs from more expensive California and struggling to keep up with growth in demand for houses and roads.

"The hottest place to be in Texas is Austin," said Orrenius. "They're just booming."

The fastest-growing city for good jobs outside of Texas was another tech capital, Seattle, which is expected to add 136,000 jobs over the next five years. Others include Oklahoma City, prospering on the shale-fracking boom in oil and gas, and Denver, which is adding jobs in construction, professional services and mining.

(See Also: How We Picked The Best Cities For Jobs)

grandma B

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