Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

News & Politics News & Politics

Shamed For Breastfeeding In Public?

Posted by on Jul. 6, 2013 at 4:11 PM
  • 10 Replies
We've heard a lot of thoughtful, impassioned arguments from moms who have to defend their rights to breastfeed in public, but we've never come across anything quite as powerful as this.

Hollie McNish, a published U.K. poet and spoken word artist, posted this video entitled "Embarrassed" on YouTube on July 4, and it's slowly but surely going viral.

See the video here (http://m.huffpost.com/ca/entry/3552062)


McNish's edgy, rap-like stanzas describe what it feels like to be publically shamed into hiding out in toilet stalls to breastfeed her daughter.

"I thought it was OK. I could understand the reasons. They said: there might be a man or nervous child seeing this small piece of flesh that they weren't quite expecting. So I whispered and tiptoed with nervous discretion. But after 6 months of her life sat sitting on lids, Sipping on milk, nostrils sniffing on piss, Trying not to bang her head on toilet roll dispensers, I wonder if these public loo feeds offend her, 'Cause I'm getting tired of discretion and being polite. My baby's first sips are drown-drenched in shite..."
She goes on to expose the irony of billboards and magazines in the United Kingdom covered in women's breasts...with a little more colourful language.

Not surprisingly, the video, which had almost 9,000 views by Friday afternoon, is getting a flood of positive and tearful comments from supportive moms and dads around the world.

One YouTube user Caitlin Harper commented, "So, so true. I could never bring myself to try feeding my son in public. And I failed him. I couldn't keep my supply up when I couldn't bring myself to feed him when we were out."

Anothe another user ejoelleduval said, "I hate that breasts have become so sexualized that they have lost their original purpose in the public mind. It is acceptable to wear bikinis that cover less, but taboo to feed your child. Overall opinion is that you are less of a mother if you bottle feed, but they won't let you do it in public. Is this just another way to shame us back into roles that were relevant 50 years ago?"

So who says feminism is dying? Seems like some battles are still just getting started.
by on Jul. 6, 2013 at 4:11 PM
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Replies (1-10):
kcangel63
by Amanda on Jul. 6, 2013 at 4:11 PM
Have you ever been shamed, or asked to leave when NIP?

JanuaryBaby06
by on Jul. 8, 2013 at 1:35 AM

 never have but i only did  in the car when out or in the bathroom if we had walked or had him wait which is terrible. i totally understand why so many formula feed. i have seen woman humilated. awful.

4kidz916
by Gold Member on Jul. 8, 2013 at 11:31 AM
1 mom liked this

I'm not against breastfeeding in public.  I just think the mother should try to be discreet about it. 

JoJoBean8
by Silver Member on Jul. 8, 2013 at 9:18 PM

I only had one time that I was made to feel uncomfortable. I don't cover but I wear so many layers you can't see much. 

Stari27
by Member on Jul. 8, 2013 at 10:02 PM

My mother-in-law expected me to go away, somewhere private every time I breast-fed at family gatherings.  When I was at my sister-in-laws house for thanksgiving a couple months after my daughter was born I asked her where to go and she suggested the back room, my father-in-law was in it.  When my mother-in-law realized that she kept trying to get him to leave the room and he just acted like he had no clue what she was meaning and talked to me the whole time acting perfectly natural about it.  He clearly saw it as a normal harmless thing, I was feeding his grandbaby, end of story.  That was the last time I was sent away to feed her at a family gathering, and anywhere else.  I doubt anyone ever saw anything anyway, she was always a passive baby, not a squirmer so I was always well covered.  

Other then that, no one ever said anything to me that I remember anywhere... I don't think most people knew what was going on usually.

JoJoBean8
by Silver Member on Jul. 9, 2013 at 9:16 AM

I have noticed women have more of an issue with nip then men. My mom used to get all nervous when I would walk around a store and nurse ds.

Quoting Stari27:

My mother-in-law expected me to go away, somewhere private every time I breast-fed at family gatherings.  When I was at my sister-in-laws house for thanksgiving a couple months after my daughter was born I asked her where to go and she suggested the back room, my father-in-law was in it.  When my mother-in-law realized that she kept trying to get him to leave the room and he just acted like he had no clue what she was meaning and talked to me the whole time acting perfectly natural about it.  He clearly saw it as a normal harmless thing, I was feeding his grandbaby, end of story.  That was the last time I was sent away to feed her at a family gathering, and anywhere else.  I doubt anyone ever saw anything anyway, she was always a passive baby, not a squirmer so I was always well covered.  

Other then that, no one ever said anything to me that I remember anywhere... I don't think most people knew what was going on usually.


kcangel63
by Amanda on Jul. 9, 2013 at 11:52 AM
I've never had anyone say anything to me. However, I have had 2 older women 70's+ give me the 'evil eye'. LOL

Quoting JoJoBean8:

I have noticed women have more of an issue with nip then men. My mom used to get all nervous when I would walk around a store and nurse ds.

Quoting Stari27:

My mother-in-law expected me to go away, somewhere private every time I breast-fed at family gatherings.  When I was at my sister-in-laws house for thanksgiving a couple months after my daughter was born I asked her where to go and she suggested the back room, my father-in-law was in it.  When my mother-in-law realized that she kept trying to get him to leave the room and he just acted like he had no clue what she was meaning and talked to me the whole time acting perfectly natural about it.  He clearly saw it as a normal harmless thing, I was feeding his grandbaby, end of story.  That was the last time I was sent away to feed her at a family gathering, and anywhere else.  I doubt anyone ever saw anything anyway, she was always a passive baby, not a squirmer so I was always well covered.  

Other then that, no one ever said anything to me that I remember anywhere... I don't think most people knew what was going on usually.


JoJoBean8
by Silver Member on Jul. 9, 2013 at 11:55 AM

I had that happen to me one time at the zoo. I just kept smiling and waving at him until he stopped. lol

Quoting kcangel63:

I've never had anyone say anything to me. However, I have had 2 older women 70's+ give me the 'evil eye'. LOL

Quoting JoJoBean8:

I have noticed women have more of an issue with nip then men. My mom used to get all nervous when I would walk around a store and nurse ds.

Quoting Stari27:

My mother-in-law expected me to go away, somewhere private every time I breast-fed at family gatherings.  When I was at my sister-in-laws house for thanksgiving a couple months after my daughter was born I asked her where to go and she suggested the back room, my father-in-law was in it.  When my mother-in-law realized that she kept trying to get him to leave the room and he just acted like he had no clue what she was meaning and talked to me the whole time acting perfectly natural about it.  He clearly saw it as a normal harmless thing, I was feeding his grandbaby, end of story.  That was the last time I was sent away to feed her at a family gathering, and anywhere else.  I doubt anyone ever saw anything anyway, she was always a passive baby, not a squirmer so I was always well covered.  

Other then that, no one ever said anything to me that I remember anywhere... I don't think most people knew what was going on usually.



kcangel63
by Amanda on Jul. 9, 2013 at 12:04 PM
LMAO! That's awesome!

Quoting JoJoBean8:

I had that happen to me one time at the zoo. I just kept smiling and waving at him until he stopped. lol

Quoting kcangel63:

I've never had anyone say anything to me. However, I have had 2 older women 70's+ give me the 'evil eye'. LOL



Quoting JoJoBean8:

I have noticed women have more of an issue with nip then men. My mom used to get all nervous when I would walk around a store and nurse ds.

Quoting Stari27:

My mother-in-law expected me to go away, somewhere private every time I breast-fed at family gatherings.  When I was at my sister-in-laws house for thanksgiving a couple months after my daughter was born I asked her where to go and she suggested the back room, my father-in-law was in it.  When my mother-in-law realized that she kept trying to get him to leave the room and he just acted like he had no clue what she was meaning and talked to me the whole time acting perfectly natural about it.  He clearly saw it as a normal harmless thing, I was feeding his grandbaby, end of story.  That was the last time I was sent away to feed her at a family gathering, and anywhere else.  I doubt anyone ever saw anything anyway, she was always a passive baby, not a squirmer so I was always well covered.  

Other then that, no one ever said anything to me that I remember anywhere... I don't think most people knew what was going on usually.



Debrowsky
by Gold Member on Jul. 9, 2013 at 2:06 PM

I knew from the beginning that breasts are also seen as sexual- as evidant in my bedroom and in the media, therefore I had no qualms in nursing my boys in privacy.  It's common sense.   The irony of this is that our society will tolerate the exposure and use of womens bodies for everything else under the sun, making everything about us sexually arousing.  let's put the same pressure on the media and advertisement to stop exploiting womens bodies for their product.    It's so simple, we just need to be modest in the use of our bodies when in public and relax when in the privacy of our homes.

Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

close Join now to connect to
other members!
Connect with Facebook or Sign Up Using Email

Already Joined? LOG IN