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2 different views of America

Posted by on Nov. 5, 2013 at 1:36 PM
  • 17 Replies

New polling by ABC News-Fusion reveals massive differences over issues such as gender, race, religion, and politics between Americans; the differences between the opposing partisan and ideological groups are so extreme, in fact, that they seem to constitute visions of two completely different Americas. The authors of the resulting study note HERE that this extreme polarization on so many issues raises the question of how the country can be effectively governed, a question that seems particularly apt in the wake of the latest government shutdown.

Partisan and ideological differences of 20, 30, 40 and even 50 points raise challenging questions
of how political accommodation can occur in this country – a consideration that may gain
urgency in the aftermath of the 16-day partial government shutdown prompted by a political dispute over the new federal health care law. In an ABC News/Washington Post poll this week,
75 percent of liberal Democrats supported that law; 76 percent of conservative Republicans
opposed it. [source]

These ideological differences tend to predispose groups to support the party which would favour their interests: for example, in immigration reform, which is part of the Democratic platform, 70 percent of non-white Americans support legal status for undocumented immigrants… and 70 percent of non-whites are also Democrats or leaning-Democrats (support for this policy is highest in liberal Democrats, with 77 percent in favour).

One issue where partisanship trumps group interest, however, is gender: while more women than men believe that women have fewer opportunities in the workplace (and more Democrats than Republicans), when it comes to the issue of women in political office, the results are much more partisan in nature.

Women in Workplace

While more female Democrats than male Democrats believe that having more women in office would be a positive thing, this is an area where male and female members of the GOP are in accordance: less than 25% of Republicans of either gender believe that having more women in politics is a positive thing for America.

These are the poll’s findings on gender, available HERE:

  • Among all adults, 53 percent think women have fewer opportunities than men in the
    workplace. But that ranges from 68 percent of Democrats to 38 percent of Republicans, a
    difference of 30 percentage points. Comparing the most unlike groups, liberal Democrats
    and conservative Republicans, it’s 76 vs. 35 percent.
  • Forty-three percent of Americans say it would be a good thing if more women were
    elected to Congress – but the range here is from six in 10 Democrats and liberals alike to
    just 26 percent of conservatives and 23 percent of Republicans. Instead two-thirds or
    more in these latter two groups say it makes no difference to them.
  • On gender issues, 63 percent of women think women have fewer opportunities than men in the
    workplace; fewer men, 43 percent, agree. And women are 13 points more apt than men to call it
    a good thing if more women were elected to Congress, 49 vs. 36 percent.
  •  Among Republicans, partisanship trumps gender in views on electing women to Congress: There’s essentially no difference between Republican men and GOP women in calling this a good thing, 22 vs. 24 percent. There is a difference, though, between Democratic men (54 percent see electing more women as a good thing), compared with Democratic women (among whom more, 69 percent, hold this view).

Rutgers made up this infographic to visualize the results.

Women in Politics

It is important to note that those who did not think it was a “good thing” to elect more women to Congress were not opposed to the notion, they simply didn’t think it was important… but this means that over 75% of the women in the Republican Party do not think that it is a priority to have more women representing their interests in Congress, even though only 18.3% of elected officials in Congress are women (and most of those are Democrats). [source] 

The Atlantic points out that this partisan distinction likely stems from a difference in attitude towards the women’s rights movement between Democrats and Republicans.

The worldviews on display here are starkly disparate: Republicans of both genders are likely to believe women have already achieved equal footing with men and that it doesn’t matter if they are elected to Congress. Democrats, meanwhile, believe both that women have fewer opportunities than men and that it’s important for them to be elected to Congress. [source]

With results like this, it’s no wonder that the United States is considered to have a serious gender disparity in politics by the World Economic Forum. In their Global Gender Gap report, the United States slid from 21th place in 2012 to 22th place in 2013 (after being in 17th place in 2011) – and almost all of the disparity is in the category of “political empowerment.” [source]

This is what the gender gap in the United States looks like for economic participation and opportunity, educational attainment, political empowerment, and health and survival; note that the United States performs well in many of these areas… with the singular exception of political empowerment.

US Gender Gap

You can view the full report HERE, but here’s how the gender gap breaks down for the United States:

US Gender Gap Subindexes

So what can this lack of political empowerment for American women be attributed to? Well, it seems like it’s the Republican Party which is effectively keeping women out of politics. By failing to run and promote female candidates and convincing the women of their own party that having female representatives is a non-issue, the GOP is keeping American women out of political power and causing the United States to slide backwards on the issue of gender equality.


by on Nov. 5, 2013 at 1:36 PM
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Replies (1-10):
SallyMJ
by Ruby Member on Nov. 5, 2013 at 2:20 PM
4 moms liked this

Yes, P&P - Only in the liberal universe is neutrality called bigotry. 

 To be neutral - the goal of MLK - is bad. To be sexist and racist is good. Ironic.

Only with liberal bias can 75% of Republicans saying it doesn't matter whether elected leaders are women or non-whites, and 25% saying it's a good thing - can be spun as sexism and racism.


The question was whether it is:

 a) A good thing,

b) A bad thing,

c) It doesn't make much difference -  

- that more women and non-white people are elected nowadays.

Because 75% of Republicans said (c) it doesn't make any difference, and 25% said it's a good thing - 

This means,  to the liberal mind, that Republicans are sexists. And racists.


Yes - that is exactly what the survey said. Look it up yourself. Just apply common sense to it instead of liberal sense. It's not the Republican responses - just the liberal conclusions to it - that were suspect.


Two different views on intellectual honesty.

4kidz916
by Gold Member on Nov. 5, 2013 at 2:26 PM
2 moms liked this

I'm not taking it as meaning republicans want to keep women out of politics.  It's meaning that republicans don't think it makes a difference if it's men or women representing us.  And truthfully, it doesn't.  None of the current politicians are listening to "we the people" so who cares if they are men or women.

PrimmednPunked
by Silver Member on Nov. 5, 2013 at 3:18 PM

OK Sally I am going to ask you to do something you may find difficult.  Forget for a moment your preconceived notions as to what is being said here and let's look at the study itself.  

While the study does point out that gender doesn't matter to a majority it also points out that Republicans and Democratic men do not think that there is inequality in the opportunities in the work place.  We know this isn't true since gender discrimination is still an issue in the US.  Also look at the poll and see that the Republican party sees no issue that there is a lack of diversity in politics.  That means they are not trying to find out why more qualified women are not in politics.  Why do you think that is? 


BTW, I don't agree with all of the points of this article.  it is horribly slanted but I found the poll to be interesting and wanted some views on it.

Quoting SallyMJ:

Yes, P&P - Only in the liberal universe is neutrality called bigotry. 

 To be neutral - the goal of MLK - is bad. To be sexist and racist is good. Ironic.

Only with liberal bias can 75% of Republicans saying it doesn't matter whether elected leaders are women or non-whites, and 25% saying it's a good thing - can be spun as sexism and racism.


The question was whether it is:

 a) A good thing,

b) A bad thing,

c) It doesn't make much difference -  

- that more women and non-white people are elected nowadays.

Because 75% of Republicans said (c) it doesn't make any difference, and 25% said it's a good thing - 

This means,  to the liberal mind, that Republicans are sexists. And racists.


Yes - that is exactly what the survey said. Look it up yourself. Just apply common sense to it instead of liberal sense. It's not the Republican responses - just the liberal conclusions to it - that were suspect.


Two different views on intellectual honesty.


Farmlady09
by Silver Member on Nov. 5, 2013 at 3:39 PM
2 moms liked this

Barbara Boxer
Diane Feinstein
Nancy Pelosi
Cynthia McKinney

We need more like this like a hole in the head.

PrimmednPunked
by Silver Member on Nov. 5, 2013 at 3:43 PM
1 mom liked this

And how many men could we add to that list?  

Quoting Farmlady09:

Barbara Boxer
Diane Feinstein
Nancy Pelosi
Cynthia McKinney

We need more like this like a hole in the head.


susan115
by on Nov. 5, 2013 at 3:48 PM
1 mom liked this

Honestly, we women are our own worst enemy.  Men never make fun a construction worker who puts food on the table, but women will and they do. 

Farmlady09
by Silver Member on Nov. 5, 2013 at 3:56 PM

Most of them. Those women in particular (and a few others) are ugly in spirit and are the epitome of individuals who should never have any sort of power to make law in the US.


Quoting PrimmednPunked:

And how many men could we add to that list?  

Quoting Farmlady09:

Barbara Boxer
Diane Feinstein
Nancy Pelosi
Cynthia McKinney

We need more like this like a hole in the head.



 

PrimmednPunked
by Silver Member on Nov. 5, 2013 at 3:57 PM

How many women here are told they are horrible people simply because they work and put food on the table instead of being a SAHM.  

And I don't want to hear that men never make fun of other men.  I have worked in a mechanic shop where I was the only woman.  Those men can be worse drama queens than most women I know.

Quoting susan115:

Honestly, we women are our own worst enemy.  Men never make fun a construction worker who puts food on the table, but women will and they do. 


PrimmednPunked
by Silver Member on Nov. 5, 2013 at 3:58 PM
1 mom liked this

I think that there are men who are much much worse.

Quoting Farmlady09:

Most of them. Those women in particular (and a few others) are ugly in spirit and are the epitome of individuals who should never have any sort of power to make law in the US.


Quoting PrimmednPunked:

And how many men could we add to that list?  

Quoting Farmlady09:

Barbara Boxer
Diane Feinstein
Nancy Pelosi
Cynthia McKinney

We need more like this like a hole in the head.





Farmlady09
by Silver Member on Nov. 5, 2013 at 4:05 PM
2 moms liked this

I'd toss 90% of more of congress right now ... preferably from a catapult ... into the Potomac.

On a good day I'd attach them to it with a bungee cord and let 'we the people' buy tickets to toss them.


Quoting PrimmednPunked:

I think that there are men who are much much worse.

Quoting Farmlady09:

Most of them. Those women in particular (and a few others) are ugly in spirit and are the epitome of individuals who should never have any sort of power to make law in the US.

 

Quoting PrimmednPunked:

And how many men could we add to that list?  

Quoting Farmlady09:

Barbara Boxer
Diane Feinstein
Nancy Pelosi
Cynthia McKinney

We need more like this like a hole in the head.


 

 



 

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