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Why Isn't It Big News When Republicans Deny Million's Health Insurance?

Posted by on Nov. 23, 2013 at 4:01 PM
  • 17 Replies
1 mom liked this

You've probably never heard of Sherilyn Horrocks.

A 61-year-old woman with autoimmune disease, she was profiled by The Salt Lake Tribune before the governor of Utah's health summit in September, as an example of someone who would benefit from Medicaid expansion but wasn't being asked to speak at the event. Horrocks hasn't had insurance since about 2000, when her husband's company stopped offering spousal coverage.

Her condition is incurable.

"But there are medicines and procedures that would prolong my life if I could afford them," she told the Tribune's Kirsten Stewart. "I have a feeling I'm going to be one of those who falls through the cracks."

Her story certainly has ended up between the cracks. She didn't get to speak to the governor and her story never made it out of Utah.

Welcome to America, where one middle-class woman in Florida having to pick a new plan is a bigger deal than 5 million poor people being denied Medicaid expansion.

You may have heard of Dianne Barrette.

She's the 54-year-old Florida woman who was the subject of a "bombshell" report about the unintended consequences of the Affordable Care Act (ACA).

"What I have right now is what I am happy with and I just want to know why I can't keep what I have," Barrette told CBS's This Morning. "Why do I have to be forced into something else?"

There actually turned out to be an excellent answer to that question.

Barrette was paying $54 a month, more than she would pay as a tax for not being insured during the first year of the individual mandate, to essentially be uninsured. Her plan doesn't cover hospitalization -- or much of anything except $50 toward her doctor visits. One serious illness could have easily bankrupted her.

The New Republic's Obamacare Whisperer Jonathan Cohn spoke to Barrette and let her know that for about $100 a month she could get a plan that primarily covers wellness visits but would cap her costs at $6,250 a year, possibly preventing her financial ruin.

"I would jump at it," she told Cohn. "With my age, things can happen. I don't want to have bills that could make me bankrupt. I don't want to lose my house."

Not every story where someone in the individual market is forced to find a new plan, despite the president's best efforts, turns out so well.

Lee Hammack and his wife JoEllen Brothers are Obamacare supporters who find themselves in the group of approximately 2 million Americans who will be paying more for a policy that covers the same as or less than what they had before.

The reasons why this couple from San Francisco lost their plan are complex. They've only had it since 2011. The plan selects participants based on their health status and doesn't cover all the benefits required under the new health law. Kaiser Permanente could have kept the plan in place, Pro Publica's Charles Ornstein discovered. But it didn't for -- you guessed it --business reasons.

Hammack and Brothers are healthy and earn just over the 400-percent-of-the-poverty-rate threshold for subsidies. And they will have to pay more for what they currently have because of Obamacare.

To a liberal, they're the perfect argument for a public option, which would reduce the deficit by multiples more than raising the Medicare eligibility age by lowering insurance rates.

But that's cold comfort to those who have to pay more.

A small group of middle-class Americans is being asked to subsidize the poor and people with pre-existing conditions in a more direct way than they're currently subsidizing tax breaks for corporate jets, big oil, vacation homes and hedge fund managers who pay lower tax rates than nurses. In exchange, their insurance can have no lifetime caps, will have to spend 80-85 percent of premiums on care or offer rebates, and will be far more like group insurance plans, which typically offer more customer satisfaction than the often crappy private insurance plans that most people keep for only two years. But that's a subtle, hard-to-quantify tradeoff.

It's easy to have compassion for people who have had their plans canceled or have to pay more for health insurance -- even Republicans are suddenly doing it.

Millions of Americans are facing cancelations that insurance companies seem to be using to upsell their current customers to more expensive plans. Most of these people haven't been able to easily get online and shop for new plans due to the disastrous rollout of Healthcare.gov.

So finding stories that justify the narrative that this is Obama'sKatrinaIraqWhitewaterWatergateTeapotDome scandal is fun for the press, especially for Fox News. Mediaite's Tommy Christopher is trying to give himself another heart attack by fact-checking the parade of "Obamascare" victims; middle-class people forced to pay more -- more! -- for health insurance.

But it seems like something is missing from the story, doesn't it?

Could it be Sherilyn Horrocks? Or anyone who is among the more than 5 million Americans in 25 states -- including Texas, which has the highest uninsured population in the country -- who are being denied fully subsidized health insurance through the Medicaid expansion?

Medicaid, which is the one success story in the rollout of the ACA, is nearly completely absent from mainstream press coverage. The expansion of the program has proven effective at reducing Oregon's uninsured population by 10 percent in just weeks. Nearly 400,000 people have taken advantage of the program, many of them eligible before expansion and just never got around to signing up.

The media focus on middle-class losers over the poor winners should surprise exactly no one. The press goes for whatever gets viewers/clicks/corporate sponsorships.

The real story is the inexcusable callousness coming from the Republicans who are celebrating denying the poor health insurance.

Great news from Alaska -- Parnell won't expand Medicaid. This is how it's done, John Kasich. http://www.adn.com/2013/11/15/3177881/parnell-alaska-wont-expand-medicaid.html 

LOL.


Forget the cruelty of celebrating refusing health insurance to 40,000 people who earn too much for Medicaid. Denying Medicaid expansion is denying your state money to balance its budget, create jobs and support its most vulnerable hospitals. It also raises the cost of health insurance for the rest of the state by as much 9.4 percent.

But Republicans don't like giving poor people/takers free stuff -- "gifts," as Mitt Romney called them.

So put it this way: Republican governors are canceling millions of people's insurance and making them pay more for a new plan.

But apparently that's only a big story if President Obama is involved -- or it isn't happening to poor people.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/jason-sattler/why-isnt-it-big-news-when_b_4298549.html?utm_hp_ref=tw

by on Nov. 23, 2013 at 4:01 PM
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Replies (1-10):
29again
by Gold Member on Nov. 23, 2013 at 9:34 PM
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Clearly, the author of this has never been on medicaid. 

And Kasich will not have it easy, having done what the people of the state do NOT want done.  He will have to fight hard for re-election.  And his opponent on the Libertarian side is a much better person.  I will be doing everything I can to help his campaign.

Billiejeens
by Ruby Member on Nov. 24, 2013 at 9:06 AM
1 mom liked this
Quoting 29again:

Clearly, the author of this has never been on medicaid. 

And Kasich will not have it easy, having done what the people of the state do NOT want done.  He will have to fight hard for re-election.  And his opponent on the Libertarian side is a much better person.  I will be doing everything I can to help his campaign.




What has Kasich done that the people do not want?

JustCJ
by on Nov. 24, 2013 at 1:26 PM
6 moms liked this

LMAO nice try to spin this on the 'republican governors' who are cancelling millions of peoples insurance and making them pay more for a new plan. LMFAO

Only an idiot would believe that. 

wait...

skylight555
by Member on Nov. 24, 2013 at 4:53 PM
5 moms liked this

Because Republicans are realists not ideologists. The world will be so perfect if we can provide for everybody but in reality, we can't afford to do that. So, wake up and smell the coffee.

DSamuels
by Gold Member on Nov. 24, 2013 at 5:28 PM

He set up the Medicaid exchange and did it in a sneaky wy.

COLUMBUS, Ohio — As a Republican chairman of the House Budget Committee in the 1990s, John R. Kasich wielded a ferocious budget ax. On Monday, as Ohio’s governor, Mr. Kasich defied his party’s majorities in the state legislature to push through a multibillion dollar expansion of Medicaid under President Obama’s health care law.

By a 5-2 vote, an obscure committee, the Controlling Board, which normally oversees relatively small adjustments to the state budget, accepted $2.5 billion in extra Medicaid funds from the federal government. The money, recently approved by Medicaid administrators in Washington, will provide coverage for 275,000 Ohioans who have not been eligible for the program, the Kasich administration said.

The vote was an extraordinary — and possibly illegal, critics in Mr. Kasich’s own party said — end run by the governor around the General Assembly. Mr. Kasich, who initially declared himself an opponent of the Affordable Care Act and who has declined to set up a state online health insurance marketplace, has argued all year that his sense of Christian compassion, not to mention cool economic practicality, favored extending Medicaid to poor adults and those with disabilities who do not currently qualify.

But Republican majorities in both houses of the General Assembly blocked expansion. Opponents expressed disbelief that Washington would keep its promises under the health care law to pay almost all of the costs of expanding Medicaid, the joint federal-state health insurance program for the poor, and worried that Ohio taxpayers would have to pay.

A budget sent to the governor by the General Assembly forbade Medicaid expansion without lawmakers’ approval. Mr. Kasich vetoed that item. At least three bills to expand Medicaid have failed.

Mr. Kasich, who has championed job creation as he prepares for a re-election campaign next year in his swing state, has argued that expanding Medicaid eligibility will be an economic booster shot, because companies will be lured to Ohio by a healthier work force. Expansion is supported by state hospitals, the County Commissioners Association of Ohio and the Ohio Chamber of Commerce.

Under the Affordable Care Act, low-income workers are to receive federal subsidies to buy insurance starting in 2014. But there is a “coverage gap” for some who earn less than the poverty level but do not currently qualify for Medicaid. The federal law allows states to expand Medicaid eligibility to people with incomes of up to 138 percent of the federal poverty level, about $15,860 for an individual. The 2012 Supreme Court decision that upheld the law also allowed states to opt out of Medicaid expansion.

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/10/22/us/medicaid-expansion-is-set-for-ohioans.html?_r=0

Quoting Billiejeens:

Quoting 29again:

Clearly, the author of this has never been on medicaid. 

And Kasich will not have it easy, having done what the people of the state do NOT want done.  He will have to fight hard for re-election.  And his opponent on the Libertarian side is a much better person.  I will be doing everything I can to help his campaign.




What has Kasich done that the people do not want?


29again
by Gold Member on Nov. 25, 2013 at 1:57 AM


Quoting Billiejeens:

Quoting 29again:

Clearly, the author of this has never been on medicaid. 

And Kasich will not have it easy, having done what the people of the state do NOT want done.  He will have to fight hard for re-election.  And his opponent on the Libertarian side is a much better person.  I will be doing everything I can to help his campaign.




What has Kasich done that the people do not want?

He wanted to expand medicaid, but the people and the legislature said no.  He tried to sneak it into the budget this summer, they caught on and said no again.  So then, since it was just so all fired important to do this, he decided that the controlling board would be the best way to do this.  And that involved only getting a few members thrown off the board and replaced with a few handpicked people who WOULD support this righteous endeavor. 

And this comes with his campaign supposedly supporting the grass roots effort to get a measure on the ballot (which passed overwhelmingly) to give Buckeyes their own choice on Obamacare.  Our AG immediately joined into the lawsuit to oppose Obamacare, with Cuccinelli and the rest.  There was no outrage from the people about that.  The people of OH do not want Obamacare, we have made that quite plain. 

He is alienating the people who helped elect him.  The state cannot afford expanded medicaid.  Right now, sure, with the feds paying so much of it.  But each year, the state pays more, and the feds less.  It ends up with the state paying most of the cost, and we just can't do that, the way Strickland bled jobs.  Yeah, things are better, but not that good.  Not good enough to handle that kind of program.  But, like someone else, the only thing that matters is what he wants.

grandmab125
by Platinum Member on Nov. 25, 2013 at 3:47 AM
3 moms liked this

 Hohum, just another bs article full of lies posted by C who never checks any of the so-called facts in her 'source' before she posts it.  There is so much wrong with this post that it's too long to go into, nor do I want to spend the rest of the night debunking it all.  But here are two examples:

Despite the hundreds of millions of we, the taxpayers', money that Oregon has spent on slick, stupid ads, the state exchange site is completely inoperable....ha, even worse than healthcare.gov.  No one has been able to sign up on it.  The state has resorted to paper forms which are anywhere from 9 to 19 pages long.  Who on earth is going to fill out 19 pages of info to apply for insurance or medicaid, when they can just pay the cheap fine?  They had to hire 400 extra temp employees to process these, and yet not one person has been enrolled.  The only people who are enrolled are about 70,000....not 400,000 people the state contacted whom they had pre-determined could be eligible for medicaid.

And, this has been debunked numerous times.  Texas does not have the most uninsured people in the country.  That dubious distinction is owned by CA.  The only way that statement can be construed to be true is that, per capita, Texas has more uninsured people than CA not total number of uninsured.  You do know what 'per capita' means don't you?  Damn those millions of illegals who pour across the border every year.

Another thing that has been posted time and again here is that at least, it has been estimated by the CBO, 300M people will still not have insurance.  You know, that funny tid bit about illegals aren't eligible to get insurance.  Oh but wait, Obama will find a way around that part of the law too, since he arbitrarily changes it here and there on a whim...a law written by Congress (not really, but that's another story), signed by the Senate and Obama.  A move that legally presidents aren't supposed to be able to do.

Is this the same crackpot reporter who tried to debunk other Obamacare casualties in another post last month?  This so-called debunking amounts to nothing more that the jerk checking the exchanges for the cheapest policies, price wise, yet ignores the bloated deductibles and co-pays that in the end cost people two to three times more than their old policies.

Billiejeens
by Ruby Member on Nov. 25, 2013 at 7:21 AM

 


Quoting 29again:


Quoting Billiejeens:

Quoting 29again:

Clearly, the author of this has never been on medicaid. 

And Kasich will not have it easy, having done what the people of the state do NOT want done.  He will have to fight hard for re-election.  And his opponent on the Libertarian side is a much better person.  I will be doing everything I can to help his campaign.




What has Kasich done that the people do not want?

He wanted to expand medicaid, but the people and the legislature said no.  He tried to sneak it into the budget this summer, they caught on and said no again.  So then, since it was just so all fired important to do this, he decided that the controlling board would be the best way to do this.  And that involved only getting a few members thrown off the board and replaced with a few handpicked people who WOULD support this righteous endeavor. 

And this comes with his campaign supposedly supporting the grass roots effort to get a measure on the ballot (which passed overwhelmingly) to give Buckeyes their own choice on Obamacare.  Our AG immediately joined into the lawsuit to oppose Obamacare, with Cuccinelli and the rest.  There was no outrage from the people about that.  The people of OH do not want Obamacare, we have made that quite plain. 

He is alienating the people who helped elect him.  The state cannot afford expanded medicaid.  Right now, sure, with the feds paying so much of it.  But each year, the state pays more, and the feds less.  It ends up with the state paying most of the cost, and we just can't do that, the way Strickland bled jobs.  Yeah, things are better, but not that good.  Not good enough to handle that kind of program.  But, like someone else, the only thing that matters is what he wants.


 Thank you.

I was not up to speed on that.

sarahjz
by Bronze Member on Nov. 25, 2013 at 11:35 AM

Hmmm.  Interesting.  Will do some research on this...

29again
by Gold Member on Nov. 25, 2013 at 11:13 PM


Quoting Billiejeens:



Quoting 29again:


Quoting Billiejeens:

Quoting 29again:

Clearly, the author of this has never been on medicaid. 

And Kasich will not have it easy, having done what the people of the state do NOT want done.  He will have to fight hard for re-election.  And his opponent on the Libertarian side is a much better person.  I will be doing everything I can to help his campaign.




What has Kasich done that the people do not want?

He wanted to expand medicaid, but the people and the legislature said no.  He tried to sneak it into the budget this summer, they caught on and said no again.  So then, since it was just so all fired important to do this, he decided that the controlling board would be the best way to do this.  And that involved only getting a few members thrown off the board and replaced with a few handpicked people who WOULD support this righteous endeavor. 

And this comes with his campaign supposedly supporting the grass roots effort to get a measure on the ballot (which passed overwhelmingly) to give Buckeyes their own choice on Obamacare.  Our AG immediately joined into the lawsuit to oppose Obamacare, with Cuccinelli and the rest.  There was no outrage from the people about that.  The people of OH do not want Obamacare, we have made that quite plain. 

He is alienating the people who helped elect him.  The state cannot afford expanded medicaid.  Right now, sure, with the feds paying so much of it.  But each year, the state pays more, and the feds less.  It ends up with the state paying most of the cost, and we just can't do that, the way Strickland bled jobs.  Yeah, things are better, but not that good.  Not good enough to handle that kind of program.  But, like someone else, the only thing that matters is what he wants.


 Thank you.

I was not up to speed on that.

Do you live in OH?

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