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News & Politics News & Politics

Obamacare horror story debunked by Seattle Times columnist

Posted by on Nov. 24, 2013 at 10:29 PM
  • 8 Replies
http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2013/11/24/obamacare-horror-story-debunked-by-seattle-times-columnist/


A Seattle Times columnist took a closer look at a conservative headline-making health care reform case Friday and discovered that the Rush Limbaugh narrative doesn’t hold up under scrutiny.

In Danny Westneat’s piece “Debunking Obamacare sob story,” the writer checked on the reversal of fortune claimed by Jessica Sanford, a Washington parent of an ADHD-diagnosed child, who had been touted by President Obama last month as an example of the success of the Affordable Care Act because she could obtain insurance for the first time in 15 years.

When Sanford said on a Facebook post that the state had miscalculated her eligibility for a subsidy based on her income and that she was “screwed,” the media pounced, particularly conservative outlets like Fox News and Rush Limbaugh.

However, Westneat’s examination revealed that Sanford’s son qualified for Medicaid coverage at $30 a month, which would have not been available before the ACA. “He has ADHD and, according to Sanford, it costs them $250 a month for prescription drugs alone. Which will now all be covered,” Westneat wrote. While Sanford had originally been quoted for coverage at $169 a month, a bronze-level policy for a 48-year-old woman making $49,000 costs $237 a month, while a silver-level policy costs $313, Westneat added.

“So here’s a family that was totally uninsured for 15 years because it had always cost at least $500 to $600 a month for skimpy policies to cover them both. And what they can get now is full coverage for $30 a month for the son and scantier coverage in the $250 to $300 a month range for the mom. How is that a horror story?”

The decline in cost for Sanford appears to mirror the experiences of the uninsured in rural Kentucky, which like Washington state have set up state-level insurance exchanges and avoided the problems associated with the federal exchange. In a Washington Post profileof Breathitt County in rural Kentucky, writer Stephanie McCrummen noted that enrollment in areas like the poor, coal mining “Coronary Valley” are driving the state’s relatively high enrollment figures.

“In a state where 15 percent of the population, about 640,000 people, are uninsured, 56,422 have signed up for new health-care coverage, with 45,622 of them enrolled in Medicaid and the rest in private health plans, according to figures released by the governor’s office Friday,” McCrummen wrote.


by on Nov. 24, 2013 at 10:29 PM
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Replies (1-8):
Analeigh2012
by Silver Member on Nov. 24, 2013 at 11:40 PM
5 moms liked this
How is this "debunking"??
She requested to be on Fox News and I saw her tell the story live.
She said she was quoted the $169. That she could afford.
$280+ she says she CANNOT afford.

And why tout Kentucky as being a success story?
Only 8% of the original uninsured have selected plans.
Of that 8%, only 10,800 have enrolled in private health insurance plans.
While 45,622 enrolled in Medicaid?????
The 10,800 better be planning for STEEP premium increases.
AND, last I read, 130,000 people in Kentucky have seen their plans cancelled.
How is Kentucky ahead?

And again, you probably didn't read this before you posted, or read it and the math stymied you?
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
DSamuels
by Gold Member on Nov. 25, 2013 at 12:27 AM
5 moms liked this

Last I saw about 280,000 in KY had their plans cancelled. And 80% of the new enrollees are going on Medicaid. I don't know how the state is going to afford this. I know I looked at what it would cost for us if we didn't have insurand on the KY exchange, it would cost us $634 a month and that was for "the second least expensive silver plan" which has high out of pocket expenses. Not a bargain at all!

FRANKFORT, KY. — About 280,000 Kentuckians will have to give up their current insurance policies in the months ahead and enroll in alternatives that comply with the Affordable Care Act, the federalhealth care reform law.

Kentucky Department of Insurance spokeswoman Ronda Sloan said individual policies for about 130,000 people will be discontinued, as will small-group policies for about 150,000 more.

Those affected, Sloan said, will receive discontinuation letters when their policies come up for renewal.

“This is because their current plans do not meet the requirements of the Affordable Care Act,” Sloan said in an emailed statement. “Instead, they are being transitioned to new ACA-compliant policies. This is not a ‘cancellation’ or a ‘termination.’ No one is losing coverage.” (unless they can't afford the new policy)

Tea party activist David Adams, one of the state’s most ardent critics of the Affordable Care Act, said the number of people being forced to give up policies of their choosing is unacceptable.

“They’re likely either coming from a plan that was structured the way they liked it for catastrophic coverage or one of the Cadillac plans they liked,” Adams said. “In any event, they’re now being put into a cookie-cutter machine that is not consumer-friendly.”

Kentucky has been receiving good reviews for its handling of the health care reforms so far. A month into the rollout, more than 31,000 Kentuckians have signed up for medical coverage, the vast majority of whom will become Medicaid recipients. Coverage is set to begin Jan. 1.

Kentucky’s online insurance marketplace has avoided the widespread technical glitches that have plagued the federal health benefit exchange.

As of Oct. 31, more than 345,000 people have visited the Kentucky Health Benefit Exchange, most of whom have conducted pre-screenings to determine eligibility for Medicaid or government subsidies to help with the cost of private insurance.

Adams said the issue of forcing nearly 300,000 currently insured Kentuckians into different policies “blows Ken­tucky’s claims of success out of the water.”

Gov. Steve Beshear issued an executive order last year calling for Kentucky to create its online marketplace where residents can shop for insurance coverage. The state received more than $250 million from the federal government to set it up.

Beshear has said four out of five Kentuckians will be eligible for federal subsidies to help cover the cost of coverage. Those subsidies, based on income, range from less than $100 to more than $500 a month to help pay premiums.

Quoting Analeigh2012:

How is this "debunking"??
She requested to be on Fox News and I saw her tell the story live.
She said she was quoted the $169. That she could afford.
$280+ she says she CANNOT afford.

And why tout Kentucky as being a success story?
Only 8% of the original uninsured have selected plans.
Of that 8%, only 10,800 have enrolled in private health insurance plans.
While 45,622 enrolled in Medicaid?????
The 10,800 better be planning for STEEP premium increases.
AND, last I read, 130,000 people in Kentucky have seen their plans cancelled.
How is Kentucky ahead?

And again, you probably didn't read this before you posted, or read it and the math stymied you?


Analeigh2012
by Silver Member on Nov. 25, 2013 at 12:37 AM
2 moms liked this
Yes, by my calculation of the numbers she posted.... 80% are on Medicaid.
I hadn't heard the additional cancellations, but it doesn't surprise me!

So at this point there is poised to be more people uninsured January 1st than was on October 1st.
Great success story!


Quoting DSamuels:

Last I saw about 280,000 in KY had their plans cancelled. And 80% of the new enrollees are going on Medicaid. I don't know how the state is going to afford this. I know I looked at what it would cost for us if we didn't have insurand on the KY exchange, it would cost us $634 a month and that was for "the second least expensive silver plan" which has high out of pocket expenses. Not a bargain at all!

FRANKFORT, KY. — About 280,000 Kentuckians will have to give up their current insurance policies in the months ahead and enroll in alternatives that comply with the Affordable Care Act, the federalhealth care reform law.

Kentucky Department of Insurance spokeswoman Ronda Sloan said individual policies for about 130,000 people will be discontinued, as will small-group policies for about 150,000 more.

Those affected, Sloan said, will receive discontinuation letters when their policies come up for renewal.

“This is because their current plans do not meet the requirements of the Affordable Care Act,” Sloan said in an emailed statement. “Instead, they are being transitioned to new ACA-compliant policies. This is not a ‘cancellation’ or a ‘termination.’ No one is losing coverage.” (unless they can't afford the new policy)

Tea party activist David Adams, one of the state’s most ardent critics of the Affordable Care Act, said the number of people being forced to give up policies of their choosing is unacceptable.

“They’re likely either coming from a plan that was structured the way they liked it for catastrophic coverage or one of the Cadillac plans they liked,” Adams said. “In any event, they’re now being put into a cookie-cutter machine that is not consumer-friendly.”

Kentucky has been receiving good reviews for its handling of the health care reforms so far. A month into the rollout, more than 31,000 Kentuckians have signed up for medical coverage, the vast majority of whom will become Medicaid recipients. Coverage is set to begin Jan. 1.

Kentucky’s online insurance marketplace has avoided the widespread technical glitches that have plagued the federal health benefit exchange.

As of Oct. 31, more than 345,000 people have visited the Kentucky Health Benefit Exchange, most of whom have conducted pre-screenings to determine eligibility for Medicaid or government subsidies to help with the cost of private insurance.

Adams said the issue of forcing nearly 300,000 currently insured Kentuckians into different policies “blows Ken­tucky’s claims of success out of the water.”

Gov. Steve Beshear issued an executive order last year calling for Kentucky to create its online marketplace where residents can shop for insurance coverage. The state received more than $250 million from the federal government to set it up.

Beshear has said four out of five Kentuckians will be eligible for federal subsidies to help cover the cost of coverage. Those subsidies, based on income, range from less than $100 to more than $500 a month to help pay premiums.

Quoting Analeigh2012:

How is this "debunking"??

She requested to be on Fox News and I saw her tell the story live.

She said she was quoted the $169. That she could afford.

$280+ she says she CANNOT afford.



And why tout Kentucky as being a success story?

Only 8% of the original uninsured have selected plans.

Of that 8%, only 10,800 have enrolled in private health insurance plans.

While 45,622 enrolled in Medicaid?????

The 10,800 better be planning for STEEP premium increases.

AND, last I read, 130,000 people in Kentucky have seen their plans cancelled.

How is Kentucky ahead?



And again, you probably didn't read this before you posted, or read it and the math stymied you?


Posted on CafeMom Mobile
DSamuels
by Gold Member on Nov. 25, 2013 at 12:59 AM
5 moms liked this

Yep! 

But haven't you heard? Everyone can relax, their policies weren't cancelled, they were renewed for 2-3 times the old cost. No one's policies were cancelled. That's the new explanation. SMH

Quoting Analeigh2012:

Yes, by my calculation of the numbers she posted.... 80% are on Medicaid.
I hadn't heard the additional cancellations, but it doesn't surprise me!

So at this point there is poised to be more people uninsured January 1st than was on October 1st.
Great success story!


Quoting DSamuels:

Last I saw about 280,000 in KY had their plans cancelled. And 80% of the new enrollees are going on Medicaid. I don't know how the state is going to afford this. I know I looked at what it would cost for us if we didn't have insurand on the KY exchange, it would cost us $634 a month and that was for "the second least expensive silver plan" which has high out of pocket expenses. Not a bargain at all!

FRANKFORT, KY. — About 280,000 Kentuckians will have to give up their current insurance policies in the months ahead and enroll in alternatives that comply with the Affordable Care Act, the federalhealth care reform law.

Kentucky Department of Insurance spokeswoman Ronda Sloan said individual policies for about 130,000 people will be discontinued, as will small-group policies for about 150,000 more.

Those affected, Sloan said, will receive discontinuation letters when their policies come up for renewal.

“This is because their current plans do not meet the requirements of the Affordable Care Act,” Sloan said in an emailed statement. “Instead, they are being transitioned to new ACA-compliant policies. This is not a ‘cancellation’ or a ‘termination.’ No one is losing coverage.” (unless they can't afford the new policy)

Tea party activist David Adams, one of the state’s most ardent critics of the Affordable Care Act, said the number of people being forced to give up policies of their choosing is unacceptable.

“They’re likely either coming from a plan that was structured the way they liked it for catastrophic coverage or one of the Cadillac plans they liked,” Adams said. “In any event, they’re now being put into a cookie-cutter machine that is not consumer-friendly.”

Kentucky has been receiving good reviews for its handling of the health care reforms so far. A month into the rollout, more than 31,000 Kentuckians have signed up for medical coverage, the vast majority of whom will become Medicaid recipients. Coverage is set to begin Jan. 1.

Kentucky’s online insurance marketplace has avoided the widespread technical glitches that have plagued the federal health benefit exchange.

As of Oct. 31, more than 345,000 people have visited the Kentucky Health Benefit Exchange, most of whom have conducted pre-screenings to determine eligibility for Medicaid or government subsidies to help with the cost of private insurance.

Adams said the issue of forcing nearly 300,000 currently insured Kentuckians into different policies “blows Ken­tucky’s claims of success out of the water.”

Gov. Steve Beshear issued an executive order last year calling for Kentucky to create its online marketplace where residents can shop for insurance coverage. The state received more than $250 million from the federal government to set it up.

Beshear has said four out of five Kentuckians will be eligible for federal subsidies to help cover the cost of coverage. Those subsidies, based on income, range from less than $100 to more than $500 a month to help pay premiums.

Quoting Analeigh2012:

How is this "debunking"??

She requested to be on Fox News and I saw her tell the story live.

She said she was quoted the $169. That she could afford.

$280+ she says she CANNOT afford.



And why tout Kentucky as being a success story?

Only 8% of the original uninsured have selected plans.

Of that 8%, only 10,800 have enrolled in private health insurance plans.

While 45,622 enrolled in Medicaid?????

The 10,800 better be planning for STEEP premium increases.

AND, last I read, 130,000 people in Kentucky have seen their plans cancelled.

How is Kentucky ahead?



And again, you probably didn't read this before you posted, or read it and the math stymied you?



vic270
by Vic on Nov. 25, 2013 at 6:43 AM
3 moms liked this

 

so glad you stay informed, i can't beleive people are still trying to blame reps. and still defending ocare.you always have great knowledge on these subjects. you help me stay up o date.thanks

Quoting DSamuels:

Last I saw about 280,000 in KY had their plans cancelled. And 80% of the new enrollees are going on Medicaid. I don't know how the state is going to afford this. I know I looked at what it would cost for us if we didn't have insurand on the KY exchange, it would cost us $634 a month and that was for "the second least expensive silver plan" which has high out of pocket expenses. Not a bargain at all!

FRANKFORT, KY. — About 280,000 Kentuckians will have to give up their current insurance policies in the months ahead and enroll in alternatives that comply with the Affordable Care Act, the federalhealth care reform law.

Kentucky Department of Insurance spokeswoman Ronda Sloan said individual policies for about 130,000 people will be discontinued, as will small-group policies for about 150,000 more.

Those affected, Sloan said, will receive discontinuation letters when their policies come up for renewal.

“This is because their current plans do not meet the requirements of the Affordable Care Act,” Sloan said in an emailed statement. “Instead, they are being transitioned to new ACA-compliant policies. This is not a ‘cancellation’ or a ‘termination.’ No one is losing coverage.” (unless they can't afford the new policy)

Tea party activist David Adams, one of the state’s most ardent critics of the Affordable Care Act, said the number of people being forced to give up policies of their choosing is unacceptable.

“They’re likely either coming from a plan that was structured the way they liked it for catastrophic coverage or one of the Cadillac plans they liked,” Adams said. “In any event, they’re now being put into a cookie-cutter machine that is not consumer-friendly.”

Kentucky has been receiving good reviews for its handling of the health care reforms so far. A month into the rollout, more than 31,000 Kentuckians have signed up for medical coverage, the vast majority of whom will become Medicaid recipients. Coverage is set to begin Jan. 1.

Kentucky’s online insurance marketplace has avoided the widespread technical glitches that have plagued the federal health benefit exchange.

As of Oct. 31, more than 345,000 people have visited the Kentucky Health Benefit Exchange, most of whom have conducted pre-screenings to determine eligibility for Medicaid or government subsidies to help with the cost of private insurance.

Adams said the issue of forcing nearly 300,000 currently insured Kentuckians into different policies “blows Ken­tucky’s claims of success out of the water.”

Gov. Steve Beshear issued an executive order last year calling for Kentucky to create its online marketplace where residents can shop for insurance coverage. The state received more than $250 million from the federal government to set it up.

Beshear has said four out of five Kentuckians will be eligible for federal subsidies to help cover the cost of coverage. Those subsidies, based on income, range from less than $100 to more than $500 a month to help pay premiums.

Quoting Analeigh2012:

How is this "debunking"??
She requested to be on Fox News and I saw her tell the story live.
She said she was quoted the $169. That she could afford.
$280+ she says she CANNOT afford.

And why tout Kentucky as being a success story?
Only 8% of the original uninsured have selected plans.
Of that 8%, only 10,800 have enrolled in private health insurance plans.
While 45,622 enrolled in Medicaid?????
The 10,800 better be planning for STEEP premium increases.
AND, last I read, 130,000 people in Kentucky have seen their plans cancelled.
How is Kentucky ahead?

And again, you probably didn't read this before you posted, or read it and the math stymied you?



 

numbr1wmn
by Nikki on Nov. 25, 2013 at 9:47 AM
2 moms liked this

Celestrial why do you post and run. Back this up.  I can't see how this is debunking anything

sarahjz
by Bronze Member on Nov. 25, 2013 at 11:34 AM
I'm glad someone is investigating something.
DSamuels
by Gold Member on Nov. 25, 2013 at 4:26 PM

Why thank you. That's one of the nicest things anyone on CM has ever said to me.

blowing kisses

Quoting vic270:


so glad you stay informed, i can't beleive people are still trying to blame reps. and still defending ocare.you always have great knowledge on these subjects. you help me stay up o date.thanks

Quoting DSamuels:

Last I saw about 280,000 in KY had their plans cancelled. And 80% of the new enrollees are going on Medicaid. I don't know how the state is going to afford this. I know I looked at what it would cost for us if we didn't have insurand on the KY exchange, it would cost us $634 a month and that was for "the second least expensive silver plan" which has high out of pocket expenses. Not a bargain at all!

FRANKFORT, KY. — About 280,000 Kentuckians will have to give up their current insurance policies in the months ahead and enroll in alternatives that comply with the Affordable Care Act, the federalhealth care reform law.

Kentucky Department of Insurance spokeswoman Ronda Sloan said individual policies for about 130,000 people will be discontinued, as will small-group policies for about 150,000 more.

Those affected, Sloan said, will receive discontinuation letters when their policies come up for renewal.

“This is because their current plans do not meet the requirements of the Affordable Care Act,” Sloan said in an emailed statement. “Instead, they are being transitioned to new ACA-compliant policies. This is not a ‘cancellation’ or a ‘termination.’ No one is losing coverage.” (unless they can't afford the new policy)

Tea party activist David Adams, one of the state’s most ardent critics of the Affordable Care Act, said the number of people being forced to give up policies of their choosing is unacceptable.

“They’re likely either coming from a plan that was structured the way they liked it for catastrophic coverage or one of the Cadillac plans they liked,” Adams said. “In any event, they’re now being put into a cookie-cutter machine that is not consumer-friendly.”

Kentucky has been receiving good reviews for its handling of the health care reforms so far. A month into the rollout, more than 31,000 Kentuckians have signed up for medical coverage, the vast majority of whom will become Medicaid recipients. Coverage is set to begin Jan. 1.

Kentucky’s online insurance marketplace has avoided the widespread technical glitches that have plagued the federal health benefit exchange.

As of Oct. 31, more than 345,000 people have visited the Kentucky Health Benefit Exchange, most of whom have conducted pre-screenings to determine eligibility for Medicaid or government subsidies to help with the cost of private insurance.

Adams said the issue of forcing nearly 300,000 currently insured Kentuckians into different policies “blows Ken­tucky’s claims of success out of the water.”

Gov. Steve Beshear issued an executive order last year calling for Kentucky to create its online marketplace where residents can shop for insurance coverage. The state received more than $250 million from the federal government to set it up.

Beshear has said four out of five Kentuckians will be eligible for federal subsidies to help cover the cost of coverage. Those subsidies, based on income, range from less than $100 to more than $500 a month to help pay premiums.

Quoting Analeigh2012:

How is this "debunking"??
She requested to be on Fox News and I saw her tell the story live.
She said she was quoted the $169. That she could afford.
$280+ she says she CANNOT afford.

And why tout Kentucky as being a success story?
Only 8% of the original uninsured have selected plans.
Of that 8%, only 10,800 have enrolled in private health insurance plans.
While 45,622 enrolled in Medicaid?????
The 10,800 better be planning for STEEP premium increases.
AND, last I read, 130,000 people in Kentucky have seen their plans cancelled.
How is Kentucky ahead?

And again, you probably didn't read this before you posted, or read it and the math stymied you?





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You must be a member to reply to this post.
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