Tomorrow, the Obama administration will unleash a public relations campaign declaring healthcare.gov fixed:

Obama administration officials said Saturday they were “on track” to have the problematic ObamaCare website running smoothly by their self-imposed Nov. 30 deadline.

“With the scheduled upgrades last night and tonight, we’re on track to meet our stated goal for the site to work for the vast majority of users,” Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services spokesman Aaron Albright told Fox News, in a statement.

Administration officials have since announcing the deadline qualified expectations and outcomes by repeatedly saying the site would work for the “vast majority of people.”

The Washington Post earlier Saturday reported the administration was prepared to announce Sunday that they have met deadlines for improving HealthCare.gov.

Fixed has been so far defined downward for healthcare.gov, that almost anything other than a 404 Error message is “fixed”.

Via NPR, How Will We Know If HealthCare.gov Is Fixed?

Saturday is the day the Obama administration set as its deadline for making HealthCare.gov a “smooth experience” for most users.

A tech-savvy team of engineers, database architects and contractors have beenworking through the holiday to ensure the White House makes good on that promise, but judging the success of their efforts may take some time.

How will we know whether the website is fixed? NPR’s health policy correspondent Julie Rovner says that partly depends on how you define “fixed.”  …

That’s the really frustrating part. I’m not sure we will, at least not at first. We do already know it’s working better than it was in October — which, frankly, was a pretty low bar to get over. The administration has all kinds of fancy metrics to show how well the website is working, but we don’t have our own independent access to them.

We do know a big test is likely to come on Monday, when people who have been talking to relatives over the long holiday weekend — or who wake up and suddenly realize it’s December and they want coverage in January — all try to sign on at once.

Or don’t all sign on at once, don’t fill out applications, don’t pay for it, or don’t actually get private insurance.

The website is a high profile example of Obamacare failure, but it’s merely the most visible.  The extraordinary percentage of people being put on Medicaid or insurance plans that do not include their doctors is a more meaningful measure.

Brit Hume’s wife — who doesn’t need insurance because it is provided by Fox News — tested the system. The website worked but the coverage options were horrible: