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News & Politics News & Politics

Orthodox Jews Prep for Knock Out Attacks with Defense Classes

Posted by   + Show Post

 16 Dec 2013, 5:50 AM PDT

Last week a group of Orthodox Jews prepared for "knock out" attacks in a class held in a synagogue basement.  Thirty people gathered to be trained in the art of krav maga, an Israeli martial art at the Young Israel of Queens Valley Synagogue.


Instructor Avraham Avramcheyiv explained "The knockout game is a terrible thing, but not a lot of people know about it.  "People these days are naive and unaware of what’s going on around them. The most important thing to focus on is being aware of your surroundings."

Residents in the neighborhood are concerned about the attacks. 

Female student Sigalit Nissanov, 33, noted, "You never think this type of thing is going to happen to you. No one expects to be punched randomly in the street.

When I heard about the woman who got punched a few blocks from here, I was mortified. It made me want to take some action."

"It’s frightening to me,’" said computer analyst Henry Moscovic, 62. "People should be aware if it. I know some men and women got hurt pretty badly.

"There’s no purpose or rhetoric to these assaults,’" he said. "It’s a very random thing. I don’t know what to make of it. Why would anyone take pleasure in hurting people? I think these kids are bored, and they are looking for kicks."

by on Dec. 16, 2013 at 2:18 PM
Replies (21-30):
collectivecow
by Member on Dec. 17, 2013 at 7:45 PM

Hasidic Jews are Orthodox Jews. o.O

Quoting blueforewolf:

wrong wrong wrong - liberals want to protect themselves like anyone else  - I don't know where you are getting your ideas from  also I don't know where you are getting your categories of different kinds of Jews from either  there are orthodox Jews, conservative Jews (this has nothing to do with politics even though the word conservative is used), Hasidic Jews, Reform Jews,  to name a few... but not "liberal" Jews

Quoting SallyMJ:

Conservatives generally agree with self defense, particulary guns.

Liberals generally disagree with it and blame people who protect themselves of being murderers.

Quoting blueforewolf:

how is this an example of anything of the kind? There was no mention of political affiliations in this article it was about self defence - 

Quoting SallyMJ:

Another example of how Orthodox Jews tend to be conservative.

And liberal Jews tend to be lib/progs.






collectivecow
by Member on Dec. 17, 2013 at 7:46 PM

Orthodox Judaism IS normative Judaism: The hardest right of the branches. Conservative and Reform Judaism branched FROM Orthodox Judaism and are less restrictive in terms of practice.

90% of the people I've met can't tell the difference in branches, or anything about Judaism in general (that includes this website as well).

Quoting SallyMJ:

Liberals think it was a crime - the crime of murder - that George Zimmerman protected himself, which ended up in TM's death.

I don't know where you are getting your ideas from - the MSM, I imagine. And I don't know where you are getting your categories of different kinds of Jews - since Orthodox Jews are not really Jews, yes? And they don't tend to be conservative. And they didn't vote for Romney at about a 75% rate. 

Liberal Jews refers to politics, silly. Everyone knows the main Jewish denominations.

Quoting blueforewolf:

wrong wrong wrong - liberals want to protect themselves like anyone else  - I don't know where you are getting your ideas from  also I don't know where you are getting your categories of different kinds of Jews from either  there are orthodox Jews, conservative Jews (this has nothing to do with politics even though the word conservative is used), Hasidic Jews, Reform Jews,  to name a few... but not "liberal" Jews

Quoting SallyMJ:

Conservatives generally agree with self defense, particulary guns.

Liberals generally disagree with it and blame people who protect themselves of being murderers.

Quoting blueforewolf:

how is this an example of anything of the kind? There was no mention of political affiliations in this article it was about self defence - 

Quoting SallyMJ:

Another example of how Orthodox Jews tend to be conservative.

And Conservative, Reform, and secular Jews tend to be lib/progs.






blueforewolf
by on Dec. 17, 2013 at 7:49 PM

nope they aren't

Quoting collectivecow:

Hasidic Jews are Orthodox Jews. o.O

Quoting blueforewolf:

wrong wrong wrong - liberals want to protect themselves like anyone else  - I don't know where you are getting your ideas from  also I don't know where you are getting your categories of different kinds of Jews from either  there are orthodox Jews, conservative Jews (this has nothing to do with politics even though the word conservative is used), Hasidic Jews, Reform Jews,  to name a few... but not "liberal" Jews

Quoting SallyMJ:

Conservatives generally agree with self defense, particulary guns.

Liberals generally disagree with it and blame people who protect themselves of being murderers.

Quoting blueforewolf:

how is this an example of anything of the kind? There was no mention of political affiliations in this article it was about self defence - 

Quoting SallyMJ:

Another example of how Orthodox Jews tend to be conservative.

And liberal Jews tend to be lib/progs.






collectivecow
by Member on Dec. 17, 2013 at 7:50 PM

I was raised Orthodox: YES they are.

Quoting blueforewolf:

nope they aren't

Quoting collectivecow:

Hasidic Jews are Orthodox Jews. o.O

Quoting blueforewolf:

wrong wrong wrong - liberals want to protect themselves like anyone else  - I don't know where you are getting your ideas from  also I don't know where you are getting your categories of different kinds of Jews from either  there are orthodox Jews, conservative Jews (this has nothing to do with politics even though the word conservative is used), Hasidic Jews, Reform Jews,  to name a few... but not "liberal" Jews

Quoting SallyMJ:

Conservatives generally agree with self defense, particulary guns.

Liberals generally disagree with it and blame people who protect themselves of being murderers.

Quoting blueforewolf:

how is this an example of anything of the kind? There was no mention of political affiliations in this article it was about self defence - 

Quoting SallyMJ:

Another example of how Orthodox Jews tend to be conservative.

And liberal Jews tend to be lib/progs.








collectivecow
by Member on Dec. 17, 2013 at 7:52 PM
1 mom liked this

Here, this is from my group and it helps clarify confusion for many people.


Judaism is divided into branches, the same way that Christianity is divided into denominations.

The main branches are:

Orthodox, Conservative, Reform, Reconstructionist, Humanistic


Orthodox:

Basic Principles:

- God gave Moses the whole Torah (both Written and Oral) at Mount Sinai
- The Torah contains 613 commandments that are binding on Jews (and only Jews)

Who is a Jew?
- Someone who is born from a Jewish mother
- Someone who converts to Judaism through an Orthodox conversion

Rambam's 13 Principles of Faith (summary of core beliefs):


1.   God is the Creator and Ruler of all things: He alone made, makes, and will make all things.
2.   God is One: He alone is our God. He was, He is and He will be.
3.   God does not have a body. Physical concepts do not apply.
4.   God is first and last.
5.   It is proper to pray to God. A Jew may not pray to anyone or anything else.
6.   All the words of the prophets are true.
7.   The prophecy of Moses is true. He was the chief of all prophets, both before and after him.
8.   The Torah that we now have was given to Moses.
9.   The Torah will not be changed and that there will never be another given.
10. God knows all of man's deeds and thoughts.
11. God rewards those who keep commandments and punishes those who transgress (Jews only).
12. Belief in the coming of Messiah (not Jesus: We do not believe he is the Messiah).
13. The dead will be brought back to life when God wills it to happen.

Practice
In terms of practice, Orthodox Jews strictly follow the Written Torah and the Oral Law as interpreted by the Medieval commentators and codified in the Codices. From the time they get up in the morning until they go to bed at night, Orthodox Jews observe God's commandments concerning prayer, dress, food, sex, family relations, social behavior, the Sabbath day, holidays and more.

Movement
The term "Orthodox" Judaism only emerged as a result of the growth of new branches of Judaism. Orthodox Judaism views itself as the continuation of the beliefs and practices of normative Judaism, as accepted by the Jewish nation at Mt. Sinai and codified in successive generations in an ongoing process that continues today.

Modern Orthodox Jews strictly observe Jewish Law, but integrate into modern society. Orthodox Jews, which includes Chasidic Jews, strictly observe Jewish laws and do not integrate into modern society.

In here you will see the following branches:
- Haredi
- Hasidic
- Modern Orthodox


Hareidi:

This is the community referred to as ultra-orthodox by the media. They also incorrectly categorize Hasidim in this group. These are the hardest right Jews you will find.


Hasidic:

Hasidic literally means (love and piety): These are Orthodox Jews who believe that we must infuse positive spirituality and joy in everything we do.  They base these teachings from the Baal Shem Tov, and further on their Rabbinical leaders. Hasidim are subdivided by what are called dynasties, which are divided by the Rabbinical teachings/leaders that people follow.

The non dynasty related subgroups:
Breslov, Malachim, Vien
List of dynasties (cut to put most well-known):
Chabad-Lubavitch, Yivo, Vizhnitz, Skloyle, Skver, Satmar, Ger, Dombrov, Sanz, Shneerson, etc...
...As you can see the list goes on and is quite extensive. It just means that these subgroups follow a particular Rabbi in teaching.

Modern Orthodox:
Orthodox Jews who believe in communicating with the current world and maintaining orthodoxy, while being a part of the technological advances society has.

Conservative

Basic Principles:

- The Torah comes from God, but was transmitted by humans
- Because the Torah was transmitted by humans, it contains a human component
- Generally accepts the binding nature of
Jewish Law
- Believes Law should adapt, absorbing aspects of culture while staying true to Jewish values.

Who is a Jew?
- Someone born from a Jewish mother
- Someone who has converted to Conservative or Orthodox Judaism
- Some Conservative Rabbis accept Reform conversions; as long as it is a halachic conversion
(eg it included the beit din, hatafot dam brit, brit milah and mikvah immersion). 


The roots for Conservative Judaism stretch back into the 1880s, but the movement was formally organized by Dr. Solomon Schechter in 1913. 

Dr. Schechter wanted the movement to implement certain key ideas:


a) The whole of the Jewish community
b) Jewry based on the North American experience
c) Jewry related to modern living
d) Jewry devoted to Torah, with education a major priority
e) Jewry normatively halachic

Ismar Schorsch, Chancellor of the Jewish Theological Seminary, identifies and explores seven core values of Conservative Judaism in his monograph, "The Sacred Cluster: The Core Values of Conservative Judaism." According to Schorsch, the core values of Conservative Judaism are:

  1. The Centrality of Modern Israel
  2. Hebrew: The Irreplaceable Language of Jewish Expression
  3. Devotion to the Ideal of the Jewish community
  4. The Defining Role of Torah in the Reshaping of Judaism
  5. The Study of Torah
  6. The Governance of Jewish Life by Halakha
  7. Belief in God

Reform

Basic Principles:

- The Torah was written by different human sources, rather than by God.
- Does not accept the binding nature of Jewish Law
- Retains much of the values and ethics of Judaism as well as some of the practices and culture.

Who is a Jew?
- Someone born to a Jewish mother
- Someone born to a Jewish father* if the child recognizes themselves as Jewish and was raised Jewish
- Someone who converts to Judaism by either the Reform, Conservative or Orthodox branches

Commitments:
- Committed to a Judaism that changes and adapts to the needs of the day
- Committed to the absolute equality of women in all areas of Jewish life
- Committed to social justice
- Committed to the principle of inclusion, not exclusion

The largest Jewish movement in North America, was founded by Rabbi Isaac Mayer Wise 125 years ago. Though its early classical period was in Germany and Central Europe, Reform Judaism has undergone its greatest period of growth and development in the US.

Progressive Judaism is rooted in the Bible, especially in the teachings of the Hebrew Prophets. It is founded on authentic manifestations of Jewish creativity, ancient and modern, particularly those that stress inwardness and desire to learn what God expects from us; justice and equality, democracy and peace, personal fulfillment and collective obligations.

The practices of Progressive Judaism are anchored in Jewish thought and tradition. They seek to extend the range of observance by granting full equality to all Jews, irrespective of gender and sexual orientation - while challenging laws that are contrary to Judaism's fundamental principles.

One of the guiding principles of Reform Judaism is the autonomy of the individual. A Reform Jew has the right to decide whether to subscribe to a particular belief or practice.

The Movement accepts that all Jews -- whether Reform, Conservative, Reconstructionist, or Orthodox -- are essential parts of the worldwide community of Jewry. Reform Judaism maintains that all Jews have an obligation to study the traditions and to observe those mitzvot (sacred acts) that have meaning today and that can ennoble Jewish families and communities.

Reform Judaism differs from more ritually observant forms of Judaism in that it recognizes that the sacred heritage has evolved and adapted over the centuries and that it must continue to do so.

Like Reform Jews worldwide, the members value the principal of "Tikkun Olam" - the repair of the world through the pursuit of social justice - as they value ritual and tradition.



Quoting blueforewolf:

nope they aren't

Quoting collectivecow:

Hasidic Jews are Orthodox Jews. o.O

Quoting blueforewolf:

wrong wrong wrong - liberals want to protect themselves like anyone else  - I don't know where you are getting your ideas from  also I don't know where you are getting your categories of different kinds of Jews from either  there are orthodox Jews, conservative Jews (this has nothing to do with politics even though the word conservative is used), Hasidic Jews, Reform Jews,  to name a few... but not "liberal" Jews

Quoting SallyMJ:

Conservatives generally agree with self defense, particulary guns.

Liberals generally disagree with it and blame people who protect themselves of being murderers.

Quoting blueforewolf:

how is this an example of anything of the kind? There was no mention of political affiliations in this article it was about self defence - 

Quoting SallyMJ:

Another example of how Orthodox Jews tend to be conservative.

And liberal Jews tend to be lib/progs.







SallyMJ
by Ruby Member on Dec. 17, 2013 at 7:55 PM

What's the difference between being Orthodox and being observant. They sound the same to me. - But obviously it means something different to you.

I'm sorry for your trauma.   :(

Exactly - Every time I encounter a Jewish person, I remember that God keeps his promise when he said he would always have a remnant. I don't know if there is another group that could have gone through all that and not been extinguished.

Quoting collectivecow:

I am still observant. That does not negate the years I spent in Yeshiva and observing laws to the strictest degree, nor does it imply I know any less.

Had I not gone through a terrible trauma (which I will not mention publically), I would still be Orthodox today.

It's not a large population. We're actually 0.018% of the World population. Then again, the Bible literally says we will always be a small people.

Quoting SallyMJ:

EXACTLY. Polls speak for themselves.

You might become familiar with the them.

You said you were raised Orthodox. Which implies you are not Orthodox today. (I was raised Catholic.  But am not Catholic today, though I am nondenominational Christian.) Which explains why you are not conservative. 

And Jews are 2% of the population. How is that a large portion?

http://newcentrist.wordpress.com/2008/09/26/more-on-jewish-voting-patterns-in-election-2008/

Quoting collectivecow:

Not necessarily: Polls speak for themselves regarding this matter.

What you should consider is that for many Jewish Americans, it's not necessarily party affiliation but topic handling and discussion. So the party that leans more toward Jewish values of importance, will most likely obtain the vote.

Quoting SallyMJ:

Anecdotal evidence, of course.

Doesn't change the fact that more Orthodox Jews tend to be conservative.

And more non-Orthodox Jews tend to be liberal.

Quoting collectivecow:

I was raised Orthodox. I'm Independant and I know plenty of Orthodox Jews who are NOT conservative. I also know plenty of non-Orthodox Jews who are.

Quoting SallyMJ:

Except Orthodox Jews tend to be conservative. That is political.

But politics isn't mentioned in the OP.

Quoting collectivecow:

This doesn't have anything to do with political leanings. People are getting hurt in Jewish community, so the community finds a way to combat the problem and promote self-defense in turn. One's political stance is irrelevant to their need for physical safety.

This is something I think all people can agree on.

What it does show, is that we look out for and take care of those within our communities in need.



blueforewolf
by on Dec. 17, 2013 at 7:59 PM

Modern Orthodox Jews strictly observe Jewish Law, but integrate into modern society. Orthodox Jews, which includes Chasidic Jews, strictly observe Jewish laws and do not integrate into modern society.

oh so I forgot to say "modern" excuse me   my mom was brought up orthodox and use to call the Chasidic Jews crazy lol  


Quoting collectivecow:

Here, this is from my group and it helps clarify confusion for many people.


Judaism is divided into branches, the same way that Christianity is divided into denominations.

The main branches are:

Orthodox, Conservative, Reform, Reconstructionist, Humanistic


Orthodox:

Basic Principles:

- God gave Moses the whole Torah (both Written and Oral) at Mount Sinai
- The Torah contains 613 commandments that are binding on Jews (and only Jews)

Who is a Jew?
- Someone who is born from a Jewish mother
- Someone who converts to Judaism through an Orthodox conversion

Rambam's 13 Principles of Faith (summary of core beliefs):


1.   God is the Creator and Ruler of all things: He alone made, makes, and will make all things.
2.   God is One: He alone is our God. He was, He is and He will be.
3.   God does not have a body. Physical concepts do not apply.
4.   God is first and last.
5.   It is proper to pray to God. A Jew may not pray to anyone or anything else.
6.   All the words of the prophets are true.
7.   The prophecy of Moses is true. He was the chief of all prophets, both before and after him.
8.   The Torah that we now have was given to Moses.
9.   The Torah will not be changed and that there will never be another given.
10. God knows all of man's deeds and thoughts.
11. God rewards those who keep commandments and punishes those who transgress (Jews only).
12. Belief in the coming of Messiah (not Jesus: We do not believe he is the Messiah).
13. The dead will be brought back to life when God wills it to happen.

Practice
In terms of practice, Orthodox Jews strictly follow the Written Torah and the Oral Law as interpreted by the Medieval commentators and codified in the Codices. From the time they get up in the morning until they go to bed at night, Orthodox Jews observe God's commandments concerning prayer, dress, food, sex, family relations, social behavior, the Sabbath day, holidays and more.

Movement
The term "Orthodox" Judaism only emerged as a result of the growth of new branches of Judaism. Orthodox Judaism views itself as the continuation of the beliefs and practices of normative Judaism, as accepted by the Jewish nation at Mt. Sinai and codified in successive generations in an ongoing process that continues today.

Modern Orthodox Jews strictly observe Jewish Law, but integrate into modern society. Orthodox Jews, which includes Chasidic Jews, strictly observe Jewish laws and do not integrate into modern society.

In here you will see the following branches:
- Haredi
- Hasidic
- Modern Orthodox


Hareidi:

This is the community referred to as ultra-orthodox by the media. They also incorrectly categorize Hasidim in this group. These are the hardest right Jews you will find.


Hasidic:

Hasidic literally means (love and piety): These are Orthodox Jews who believe that we must infuse positive spirituality and joy in everything we do.  They base these teachings from the Baal Shem Tov, and further on their Rabbinical leaders. Hasidim are subdivided by what are called dynasties, which are divided by the Rabbinical teachings/leaders that people follow.

The non dynasty related subgroups:
Breslov, Malachim, Vien
List of dynasties (cut to put most well-known):
Chabad-Lubavitch, Yivo, Vizhnitz, Skloyle, Skver, Satmar, Ger, Dombrov, Sanz, Shneerson, etc...
...As you can see the list goes on and is quite extensive. It just means that these subgroups follow a particular Rabbi in teaching.

Modern Orthodox:
Orthodox Jews who believe in communicating with the current world and maintaining orthodoxy, while being a part of the technological advances society has.

Conservative

Basic Principles:

- The Torah comes from God, but was transmitted by humans
- Because the Torah was transmitted by humans, it contains a human component
- Generally accepts the binding nature of
Jewish Law
- Believes Law should adapt, absorbing aspects of culture while staying true to Jewish values.

Who is a Jew?
- Someone born from a Jewish mother
- Someone who has converted to Conservative or Orthodox Judaism
- Some Conservative Rabbis accept Reform conversions; as long as it is a halachic conversion
(eg it included the beit din, hatafot dam brit, brit milah and mikvah immersion). 


The roots for Conservative Judaism stretch back into the 1880s, but the movement was formally organized by Dr. Solomon Schechter in 1913. 

Dr. Schechter wanted the movement to implement certain key ideas:


a) The whole of the Jewish community
b) Jewry based on the North American experience
c) Jewry related to modern living
d) Jewry devoted to Torah, with education a major priority
e) Jewry normatively halachic

Ismar Schorsch, Chancellor of the Jewish Theological Seminary, identifies and explores seven core values of Conservative Judaism in his monograph, "The Sacred Cluster: The Core Values of Conservative Judaism." According to Schorsch, the core values of Conservative Judaism are:

  1. The Centrality of Modern Israel
  2. Hebrew: The Irreplaceable Language of Jewish Expression
  3. Devotion to the Ideal of the Jewish community
  4. The Defining Role of Torah in the Reshaping of Judaism
  5. The Study of Torah
  6. The Governance of Jewish Life by Halakha
  7. Belief in God

Reform

Basic Principles:

- The Torah was written by different human sources, rather than by God.
- Does not accept the binding nature of Jewish Law
- Retains much of the values and ethics of Judaism as well as some of the practices and culture.

Who is a Jew?
- Someone born to a Jewish mother
- Someone born to a Jewish father* if the child recognizes themselves as Jewish and was raised Jewish
- Someone who converts to Judaism by either the Reform, Conservative or Orthodox branches

Commitments:
- Committed to a Judaism that changes and adapts to the needs of the day
- Committed to the absolute equality of women in all areas of Jewish life
- Committed to social justice
- Committed to the principle of inclusion, not exclusion

The largest Jewish movement in North America, was founded by Rabbi Isaac Mayer Wise 125 years ago. Though its early classical period was in Germany and Central Europe, Reform Judaism has undergone its greatest period of growth and development in the US.

Progressive Judaism is rooted in the Bible, especially in the teachings of the Hebrew Prophets. It is founded on authentic manifestations of Jewish creativity, ancient and modern, particularly those that stress inwardness and desire to learn what God expects from us; justice and equality, democracy and peace, personal fulfillment and collective obligations.

The practices of Progressive Judaism are anchored in Jewish thought and tradition. They seek to extend the range of observance by granting full equality to all Jews, irrespective of gender and sexual orientation - while challenging laws that are contrary to Judaism's fundamental principles.

One of the guiding principles of Reform Judaism is the autonomy of the individual. A Reform Jew has the right to decide whether to subscribe to a particular belief or practice.

The Movement accepts that all Jews -- whether Reform, Conservative, Reconstructionist, or Orthodox -- are essential parts of the worldwide community of Jewry. Reform Judaism maintains that all Jews have an obligation to study the traditions and to observe those mitzvot (sacred acts) that have meaning today and that can ennoble Jewish families and communities.

Reform Judaism differs from more ritually observant forms of Judaism in that it recognizes that the sacred heritage has evolved and adapted over the centuries and that it must continue to do so.

Like Reform Jews worldwide, the members value the principal of "Tikkun Olam" - the repair of the world through the pursuit of social justice - as they value ritual and tradition.



Quoting blueforewolf:

nope they aren't

Quoting collectivecow:

Hasidic Jews are Orthodox Jews. o.O

Quoting blueforewolf:

wrong wrong wrong - liberals want to protect themselves like anyone else  - I don't know where you are getting your ideas from  also I don't know where you are getting your categories of different kinds of Jews from either  there are orthodox Jews, conservative Jews (this has nothing to do with politics even though the word conservative is used), Hasidic Jews, Reform Jews,  to name a few... but not "liberal" Jews

Quoting SallyMJ:

Conservatives generally agree with self defense, particulary guns.

Liberals generally disagree with it and blame people who protect themselves of being murderers.

Quoting blueforewolf:

how is this an example of anything of the kind? There was no mention of political affiliations in this article it was about self defence - 

Quoting SallyMJ:

Another example of how Orthodox Jews tend to be conservative.

And liberal Jews tend to be lib/progs.








collectivecow
by Member on Dec. 17, 2013 at 8:01 PM

You know, I wear pants and probably mix my wool/linen ocassionally. That sort of thing. Basically, I try to observe to the best of my current capabilities. :P

In Hebrew, we refer to the concept you stated as hashgachah protis (divine providence). It is a miracle that Jewish people have survived into today's times, given our history.

Heck, my own family was expelled from Spain (during the Inquisition), then fled to Syria and lived there for hundreds of years. Most of the Syrian Jews were evacuated from Syria in the early century because of concerns of the rise of anti-semitism after Israel's creation. On my mother's side, my great-grandfather and her family come from Poland. He was hung in Aushwitz simply for disagreeing politically with Hitler.

Quoting SallyMJ:

What's the difference between being Orthodox and being observant. They sound the same to me. - But obviously it means something different to you.

I'm sorry for your trauma.   :(

Exactly - Every time I encounter a Jewish person, I remember that God keeps his promise when he said he would always have a remnant. I don't know if there is another group that could have gone through all that and not been extinguished.

Quoting collectivecow:

I am still observant. That does not negate the years I spent in Yeshiva and observing laws to the strictest degree, nor does it imply I know any less.

Had I not gone through a terrible trauma (which I will not mention publically), I would still be Orthodox today.

It's not a large population. We're actually 0.018% of the World population. Then again, the Bible literally says we will always be a small people.

Quoting SallyMJ:

EXACTLY. Polls speak for themselves.

You might become familiar with the them.

You said you were raised Orthodox. Which implies you are not Orthodox today. (I was raised Catholic.  But am not Catholic today, though I am nondenominational Christian.) Which explains why you are not conservative. 

And Jews are 2% of the population. How is that a large portion?

http://newcentrist.wordpress.com/2008/09/26/more-on-jewish-voting-patterns-in-election-2008/

Quoting collectivecow:

Not necessarily: Polls speak for themselves regarding this matter.

What you should consider is that for many Jewish Americans, it's not necessarily party affiliation but topic handling and discussion. So the party that leans more toward Jewish values of importance, will most likely obtain the vote.

Quoting SallyMJ:

Anecdotal evidence, of course.

Doesn't change the fact that more Orthodox Jews tend to be conservative.

And more non-Orthodox Jews tend to be liberal.

Quoting collectivecow:

I was raised Orthodox. I'm Independant and I know plenty of Orthodox Jews who are NOT conservative. I also know plenty of non-Orthodox Jews who are.

Quoting SallyMJ:

Except Orthodox Jews tend to be conservative. That is political.

But politics isn't mentioned in the OP.

Quoting collectivecow:

This doesn't have anything to do with political leanings. People are getting hurt in Jewish community, so the community finds a way to combat the problem and promote self-defense in turn. One's political stance is irrelevant to their need for physical safety.

This is something I think all people can agree on.

What it does show, is that we look out for and take care of those within our communities in need.




collectivecow
by Member on Dec. 17, 2013 at 8:02 PM

It depends on the dynasty honestly.

Modern Orthodox can be very lenient in terms of observance compared to Hasidic Jews, but there are strict MO Jews as well.

Hasidic and MO tend to butt heads on a few topics.

Quoting blueforewolf:

Modern Orthodox Jews strictly observe Jewish Law, but integrate into modern society. Orthodox Jews, which includes Chasidic Jews, strictly observe Jewish laws and do not integrate into modern society.

oh so I forgot to say "modern" excuse me   my mom was brought up orthodox and use to call the Chasidic Jews crazy lol  

Quoting collectivecow:

Here, this is from my group and it helps clarify confusion for many people.


Judaism is divided into branches, the same way that Christianity is divided into denominations.

The main branches are:

Orthodox, Conservative, Reform, Reconstructionist, Humanistic


Orthodox:

Basic Principles:

- God gave Moses the whole Torah (both Written and Oral) at Mount Sinai
- The Torah contains 613 commandments that are binding on Jews (and only Jews)

Who is a Jew?
- Someone who is born from a Jewish mother
- Someone who converts to Judaism through an Orthodox conversion

Rambam's 13 Principles of Faith (summary of core beliefs):


1.   God is the Creator and Ruler of all things: He alone made, makes, and will make all things.
2.   God is One: He alone is our God. He was, He is and He will be.
3.   God does not have a body. Physical concepts do not apply.
4.   God is first and last.
5.   It is proper to pray to God. A Jew may not pray to anyone or anything else.
6.   All the words of the prophets are true.
7.   The prophecy of Moses is true. He was the chief of all prophets, both before and after him.
8.   The Torah that we now have was given to Moses.
9.   The Torah will not be changed and that there will never be another given.
10. God knows all of man's deeds and thoughts.
11. God rewards those who keep commandments and punishes those who transgress (Jews only).
12. Belief in the coming of Messiah (not Jesus: We do not believe he is the Messiah).
13. The dead will be brought back to life when God wills it to happen.

Practice
In terms of practice, Orthodox Jews strictly follow the Written Torah and the Oral Law as interpreted by the Medieval commentators and codified in the Codices. From the time they get up in the morning until they go to bed at night, Orthodox Jews observe God's commandments concerning prayer, dress, food, sex, family relations, social behavior, the Sabbath day, holidays and more.

Movement
The term "Orthodox" Judaism only emerged as a result of the growth of new branches of Judaism. Orthodox Judaism views itself as the continuation of the beliefs and practices of normative Judaism, as accepted by the Jewish nation at Mt. Sinai and codified in successive generations in an ongoing process that continues today.

Modern Orthodox Jews strictly observe Jewish Law, but integrate into modern society. Orthodox Jews, which includes Chasidic Jews, strictly observe Jewish laws and do not integrate into modern society.

In here you will see the following branches:
- Haredi
- Hasidic
- Modern Orthodox


Hareidi:

This is the community referred to as ultra-orthodox by the media. They also incorrectly categorize Hasidim in this group. These are the hardest right Jews you will find.


Hasidic:

Hasidic literally means (love and piety): These are Orthodox Jews who believe that we must infuse positive spirituality and joy in everything we do.  They base these teachings from the Baal Shem Tov, and further on their Rabbinical leaders. Hasidim are subdivided by what are called dynasties, which are divided by the Rabbinical teachings/leaders that people follow.

The non dynasty related subgroups:
Breslov, Malachim, Vien
List of dynasties (cut to put most well-known):
Chabad-Lubavitch, Yivo, Vizhnitz, Skloyle, Skver, Satmar, Ger, Dombrov, Sanz, Shneerson, etc...
...As you can see the list goes on and is quite extensive. It just means that these subgroups follow a particular Rabbi in teaching.

Modern Orthodox:
Orthodox Jews who believe in communicating with the current world and maintaining orthodoxy, while being a part of the technological advances society has.

Conservative

Basic Principles:

- The Torah comes from God, but was transmitted by humans
- Because the Torah was transmitted by humans, it contains a human component
- Generally accepts the binding nature of
Jewish Law
- Believes Law should adapt, absorbing aspects of culture while staying true to Jewish values.

Who is a Jew?
- Someone born from a Jewish mother
- Someone who has converted to Conservative or Orthodox Judaism
- Some Conservative Rabbis accept Reform conversions; as long as it is a halachic conversion
(eg it included the beit din, hatafot dam brit, brit milah and mikvah immersion). 


The roots for Conservative Judaism stretch back into the 1880s, but the movement was formally organized by Dr. Solomon Schechter in 1913. 

Dr. Schechter wanted the movement to implement certain key ideas:


a) The whole of the Jewish community
b) Jewry based on the North American experience
c) Jewry related to modern living
d) Jewry devoted to Torah, with education a major priority
e) Jewry normatively halachic

Ismar Schorsch, Chancellor of the Jewish Theological Seminary, identifies and explores seven core values of Conservative Judaism in his monograph, "The Sacred Cluster: The Core Values of Conservative Judaism." According to Schorsch, the core values of Conservative Judaism are:

  1. The Centrality of Modern Israel
  2. Hebrew: The Irreplaceable Language of Jewish Expression
  3. Devotion to the Ideal of the Jewish community
  4. The Defining Role of Torah in the Reshaping of Judaism
  5. The Study of Torah
  6. The Governance of Jewish Life by Halakha
  7. Belief in God

Reform

Basic Principles:

- The Torah was written by different human sources, rather than by God.
- Does not accept the binding nature of Jewish Law
- Retains much of the values and ethics of Judaism as well as some of the practices and culture.

Who is a Jew?
- Someone born to a Jewish mother
- Someone born to a Jewish father* if the child recognizes themselves as Jewish and was raised Jewish
- Someone who converts to Judaism by either the Reform, Conservative or Orthodox branches

Commitments:
- Committed to a Judaism that changes and adapts to the needs of the day
- Committed to the absolute equality of women in all areas of Jewish life
- Committed to social justice
- Committed to the principle of inclusion, not exclusion

The largest Jewish movement in North America, was founded by Rabbi Isaac Mayer Wise 125 years ago. Though its early classical period was in Germany and Central Europe, Reform Judaism has undergone its greatest period of growth and development in the US.

Progressive Judaism is rooted in the Bible, especially in the teachings of the Hebrew Prophets. It is founded on authentic manifestations of Jewish creativity, ancient and modern, particularly those that stress inwardness and desire to learn what God expects from us; justice and equality, democracy and peace, personal fulfillment and collective obligations.

The practices of Progressive Judaism are anchored in Jewish thought and tradition. They seek to extend the range of observance by granting full equality to all Jews, irrespective of gender and sexual orientation - while challenging laws that are contrary to Judaism's fundamental principles.

One of the guiding principles of Reform Judaism is the autonomy of the individual. A Reform Jew has the right to decide whether to subscribe to a particular belief or practice.

The Movement accepts that all Jews -- whether Reform, Conservative, Reconstructionist, or Orthodox -- are essential parts of the worldwide community of Jewry. Reform Judaism maintains that all Jews have an obligation to study the traditions and to observe those mitzvot (sacred acts) that have meaning today and that can ennoble Jewish families and communities.

Reform Judaism differs from more ritually observant forms of Judaism in that it recognizes that the sacred heritage has evolved and adapted over the centuries and that it must continue to do so.

Like Reform Jews worldwide, the members value the principal of "Tikkun Olam" - the repair of the world through the pursuit of social justice - as they value ritual and tradition.



Quoting blueforewolf:

nope they aren't

Quoting collectivecow:

Hasidic Jews are Orthodox Jews. o.O

Quoting blueforewolf:

wrong wrong wrong - liberals want to protect themselves like anyone else  - I don't know where you are getting your ideas from  also I don't know where you are getting your categories of different kinds of Jews from either  there are orthodox Jews, conservative Jews (this has nothing to do with politics even though the word conservative is used), Hasidic Jews, Reform Jews,  to name a few... but not "liberal" Jews

Quoting SallyMJ:

Conservatives generally agree with self defense, particulary guns.

Liberals generally disagree with it and blame people who protect themselves of being murderers.

Quoting blueforewolf:

how is this an example of anything of the kind? There was no mention of political affiliations in this article it was about self defence - 

Quoting SallyMJ:

Another example of how Orthodox Jews tend to be conservative.

And liberal Jews tend to be lib/progs.









SallyMJ
by Ruby Member on Dec. 17, 2013 at 8:07 PM

True. I never knew there were Israeli martial arts.

Quoting collectivecow:

They're learning a form of martial arts though.

Quoting SallyMJ:

Conservatives generally agree with self defense, particulary guns.

Liberals generally disagree with it and blame people who protect themselves of being murderers.

Quoting blueforewolf:

how is this an example of anything of the kind? There was no mention of political affiliations in this article it was about self defence - 

Quoting SallyMJ:

Another example of how Orthodox Jews tend to be conservative.

And liberal Jews tend to be lib/progs.





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